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Technical Procedures 
Macintosh Family 
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Apple Service 
Technical Procedures 
Macintosh Family 

Volume Two 

PN: 072-0228 



Copyright 1982-1889 by Apple Computer Inc. March, 1991 



4 Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Family 

Volume Two 

Table of Contents 



Macintosh LC 



--Title page (contains build date) 

-Table of Contents 

--Basics 

—Take-Apart 

—Diagnostics 

— Troubl eshooting 

(except pages 4.1-4.19) 
—Additional Procedures 
—Illustrated Parts List 



01/91 
11/90 
11/90 
01/91 
11/90 
01/91 
11/90 
11/90 



Macintosh ilsi 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



-Table of Contents 
-Basics 

(except page 1.6) 
-Take-Apart 
-Diagnostics 
-Troubleshooting 

(except pages 4.1-4.19) 
-Additional Procedures 
-Illustrated Parts List 

(except page IPL.3) 

-Table of Contents 
-Basics 

(except 1.2) 
-Take-Apart 

(except page 2.21) 

(except pages 2.1, 2.9-2.11) 
-Diagnostics 

(except page 3.1) 
-Troubleshooting 

(except pages 4.1, 4.6-4.12, 

4.17, 4.19, 4.24, 4.26, 4.28 

4.30, 4.34) 



01/91 
10/90 
02/91 
10/90 
01/91 
10/90 
01/91 
10/90 
10/90 
03/91 

04/91 
03/90 
08/90 
03/90 
05/90 
10/90 
05/90 
04/91 
05/90 



01/91 






.Continued on next page 



Macintosh Family-Volume Two 



Apr 1991 



Main TOC / 1 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 
(Continued) 



Macintosh Ilex 



Macintosh llci 



-Additional Procedures 03/90 
(except pages 5.1, 5.12, 5.14, 5.16, 5.17) 05/90 

(except page 5.13) 07/90 

(except pages 5.11, 5.17, IPL.3) 03/91 

-Illustrated Parts List 03/90 

(except pages IPL.8, IPL.9) 04/90 

(except pages IPL.2, IPL.3, IPL.5) 10/90 

-Table of Contents 11/90 

-Basics 03/89 

(except page 1.6) 10/89 

(except page 1.15) 06/89 

-Take-Apart 03/89 

(except pages 2.12, 2.13, 2.15) 02/90 

(except pages 2.22, 2.23) 04/89 

(except page 2.14) 04/90 

-Diagnostics 03/89 

(except page 3.1) 02/90 

(except pages 3.2-3.26) 01/90 

-Troubleshooting 03/89 

(except pages 4.5-4.8, 4.26) 08/89 

-Additional Procedures 03/89 

(except pages 5.1, 5.10) 11/89 

(except pages 5.6-5.8, 5.11) 01/90 

-Illustrated Parts List 03/89 

(except page IPL.l) 11/90 

(except page IPL.4) 10/89 

(except page IPL.2) 06/90 

(except page IPL.3) 10/90 

-Table of Contents 04/91 

-Basics 09/89 

(except page 1.4) 07/90 

-Take-Apart 09/89 

(except pages 2.12-2.15) 04/90 

-Diagnostics 01/90 

(except page 3.1) 02/90 

(except pages 3.2, 3.15) 07/90 

-Troubleshooting 09/89 

(except page 4.7) 04/91 

(except page 4.1) 11/90 

(except pages 4.7, 4.11-4.14) 11/90 

-Additional Procedures 09/89 

(except pages 5.6-5.8) 01/90 

-Illustrated Parts List 09/89 
(except pages IPL.l, IPL.3, IPL.6, IPL.7) 04/91 

(except page IPL.l, IPL.4) 11/90 

(except page IPL.2, IPL.3) 03/91 



i 



■ 



2/MainTOC 



Apr 1991 



Macintosh Family-Volume Two 






Macintosh Multiple -Table of Contents 01/91 

Product Diagnostics -MacTest MP 01/91 

(except pages 1.5, 1.10, 1.11) 04/91 






Macintosh Family-Volume Two Apr 1 991 Main TOC / 3 



1 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh LC 

Technical Procedures 



□ TABLE OF CONTENTS 




Section 1 - 


1.2 


Product Description 


Basics 


1.2 


Features 




1.2 


Macintosh LC Configurations 




1.3 


Module Identification 




1.5 


Connector Identification 




1.5 


Back Panel 




1.5 


Internal Connectors 




1.6 


Macintosh LC System Features 




1.6 


Macintosh LC Logic Board 




1.9 


Apple FDHD/SuperDrive 




1.10 


Specifications 




1.13 


Theory of Operation 




1.13 


Introduction 




1.13 


System Startup 




1.14 


Logic Board 




1.17 


Input/Output Interfaces 




1.22 


Power Supply 


Section 2 - 


2.2 


Electrostatic Discharge Prevention 


Take-Apart 


2.3 


Top Case 




2.5 


Hard Disk Drive 




2.7 


Fan/Speaker Assembly 




2.8 


Floppy Disk Drive 




2.9 


Power Supply 




2.11 


Main Logic Board 


Section 3 - 


Refer 


to the MacTest MP section of the Macintosh 


Diagnostics 


Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in Volume II of the 



Macintosh Family Technical Procedures. 






Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Contents / i 



Section 4 - 


4.2 


Introduction 


Troubleshooting 


4.2 


General Information 




4.2 


Before You Start 




4.2 


Error Chords 




4.2 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




4.3 


How to Use the Troubleshooting Flowcharts 




4.3 


Things to Remember 




4.5 


Module Exchange Information 




4.5 


Logic Board Configuration 




4.5 


Internal SCSI Hard Disk 




4.6 


Startup and Error Chords 




4.6 


Introduction 




4.6 


Startup Chord 




4.6 


Error Chords 




4.7 


Symptom Chart 




4.7 


Built-in Video Problems 




4.8 


Floppy Drive Problems 




4.8 


SCSI Problems 




4.9 


Peripheral Problems 




4.10 


Miscellaneous Problems 




4.12 


Macintosh LC Flowcharts 




4.12 


Flowchart 1 Notes 




4.14 


Flowchart 2 Notes 




4.16 


Flowchart 3 Notes 




4.17 


Flowchart 4 Notes 




4.18 


Flowchart 5 Notes 




4.20 


RAM SIMM Verification 




4.20 


Introduction 




4.20 


Verification Procedure 




4.21 


Battery Verification 




4.21 


Introduction 




4.21 


Verification Procedure 


Section 5 - 


5.2 


Battery Replacement 


Additional Procedures 


5.2 


Introduction 




5.5 


Materials Required 




5.5 


Remove 




5.5 


Replace 




5.7 


Logic Board RAM Identification and Upgrades 




5.7 


Introduction 




5.7 


Identification 




5.7 


Upgrades 



ii / Contents 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh LC 



Illustrated IPL.3 Macintosh LC - System Exploded View 

Parts List (Figure 1) 



©Apple Computer, Inc., 1990 and 1991. No portion of this document may be reproduced in any 

form without the written permission of Apple Computer, Inc. 
FDHD, Apple Desktop Bus, SuperDrive, AppleColor, QuickDraw, MacTest, and Finder are 

trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 
Macintosh, A/UX, AppleTalk, MultiFinder, Apple, and the Apple logo are registered trademarks 

of Apple Computer, Inc. 
UNIX® is a registered trademark of AT&T Information Systems. 
NuBus™ is a trademark of Texas Instruments. 
MS-DOS® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. 



Macintosh LC rev. Jan 91 Contents / iii 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh LC 

Section 1 - Basics 



□ CONTENTS 








1.2 


Product Description 




1.2 


Features 




1.2 


Macintosh LC Configurations 




1.3 


Module Identification 




1.5 


Connector Identification 




1.5 


Back Panel 




1.5 


Internal Connectors 




1.6 


Macintosh LC System Features 




1.6 


Macintosh LC Logic Board 




1.9 


Apple FDHD/SuperDrive 




1.10 


Specifications 




1.13 


Theory of Operation 




1.13 


Introduction 




1.13 


System Startup 




1.14 


Logic Board 




1.17 


Input/Output Interfaces 




1.22 


Power Supply 



Macintosh LC Nov 90 Basics / 1 .1 



□ PRODUCT DESCRIPTION 



Features 



The Macintosh® LC is a low-cost Macintosh computer 
that shares many of the high-performance, open- 
architecture features of earlier Macintosh computers. 
This color system for business, education, and home 
users provides more than twice the performance of the 
Macintosh Plus. The Macintosh LC includes the 
following features: 



68020 microprocessor 

16 MHz clock frequency 

512K of ROM 

2 MB RAM, upgradeable to 10 MB 

Eight-bit built-in video support 

256K video RAM, upgradeable to 512K 

Sound input and output capabilities 

A 96-pin processor-direct slot (PDS) for system 

expansion 



Macintosh LC 
Configurations 



The Macintosh LC comes in two configurations: 

• 2 MB of RAM, one Apple® FDHD™/SuperDrive™, 
and one 40 MB SCSI hard disk drive 

• 2 MB of RAM and two Apple FDHD/SuperDrives 



Enhancements 



The following enhancements can be added: 



• Up to seven external SCSI devices (up to six 
external devices for systems with an internal SCSI 
drive) 

• 2, 4, or 8 MB of expansion RAM on SIMM boards 

• 512K video RAM SIMM (replaces 256K video RAM 
SIMM) 



1 .2 / Basics 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 






□ MODULE IDENTIFICATION 



The Macintosh LC is comprised of the modules and 
replacement parts shown in Figure 1-1 below. 



Top Case 



Battery 



Logic Board 



Power Supply 



Fan/Speaker 
Assembly 



Bottom 
Case 



SCSI 
Drive 



1.4 MB Drive 




Figure 1-1 Macintosh LC Modules and Replacement Parts 






Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Basics / 1 .3 




Power Power 

Switch Connector 



Video 
Connector 



Serial Ports 
1 and 2 



SCSI 
Connector 



ADB Sound- Sound Expansion 
Port Out Input Slot 
Port Port Access 
Panel 



Figure 1-2 Macintosh LC Back Panel 



96-Pin 
Expansion 
Connector 



VRAM SIMM 
Connector 



RAM SIMM 
Connectors 



Second 
Disk Drive 
Connector 



SCSI 
Connector 



Power 

Supply 

Connector 



SCSI 

Power 

Connector 



Disk Drive 
Connector 




Fan/Speaker 
Connector 



Battery 
Connector 



Figure 1-3 Macintosh LC Internal Connectors 



1 .4 / Basics 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 



□ CONNECTOR IDENTIFICATION 



Back 
Panel 



Figure 1-2. The back panel of the Macintosh LC has the 
following built-in ports and connectors. 



Power switch 

AC power connector 

Video connector 

Serial port 1 

Serial port 2 

SCSI connector 

Apple Desktop Bus™ port 

Sound-out port 

Sound input port 

Expansion slot access panel 



Internal 
Connectors 



Figure 1-3. The Macintosh LC logic board has the 
following internal connectors. 



Video RAM SIMM connector 

Power supply connector 

Two RAM SIMM connectors 

Internal FDHD/SuperDrive disk drive connector 

Fan/speaker connector 

Battery 

Internal SCSI connector 

Power connector for internal SCSI hard drive 

Second internal disk drive connector 

96-pin processor-direct slot (PDS) expansion 

connector 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Basics / 1 .5 



□ MACINTOSH LC SYSTEM FEATURES 



The Macintosh LC logic board includes the following 
components: 



Motorola 68020 microprocessor running at 16 MHz 

512K of ROM 

Built-in video chip (with optional VRAM) 

Serial communications controller (SCC) chip 

ADB microcontroller chip 

SWIM disk controller chip 



Macintosh LC 
Logic Board 



Figure 1-4. At the heart of the Macintosh LC is the 
same Motorola 68020 microprocessor found in the 
Macintosh II. This high-performance microprocessor 
runs at 16 MHz, and supports both 24- and 32-bit 
processing modes. The performance of the 68020 can be 
enhanced by taking advantage of separate video RAM, 
which eliminates system delay for video updates. 

The Macintosh LC logic board includes four 32-pin ROM 
chips. The ROM includes code that supports the built-in 
video and 32-bit QuickDraw™. The code also supports 
future upgrades to the Macintosh operating system. 

The built-in video chip controls all system timing, video 
generation, memory mapping, sound, and clock 
generation. The system can be configured with 0, 256K, 
or 512K of VRAM (video RAM). The VRAM is installed 
in a 68-pin SIMM socket with the same pinouts as the 
VRAM expansion chips used on the Macintosh Display 
Card 8*24. When VRAM is installed, video data is 
refreshed from the VRAM, leaving all cycles available 
to the CPU. When VRAM is not installed, the chip 
refreshes video from main memory. Video data is sent 
out through the CLUT (color lookup table) to the DB-15 
video port. 

The serial communications controller (SCC), an 8-MHz 
AMD 85C80 chip, is also known as the combo chip 
because it combines the functions of the SCC and the 
SCSI controller into a single device. The SCC portion 
of the chip controls the two RS-422 serial ports used to 
connect the Macintosh LC to networks, printers, and 
modems. The SCSI (small computer system interface) 
controller portion of the combo chip controls the high- 
speed parallel port that connects as many as seven 



1 .6 / Basics 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 






external SCSI devices. The SCSI circuit includes the 
50-pin internal connector on the logic board and the 
DB-25 external connector. 



68020 ADB SCC 

Microprocessor Microcontroller Chip 
Chip 

nr 




System 
ROM 



Built-in 

Video 

Chip 



SWIM 
Chip 



Figure 1-4 Macintosh LC Logic Board 

The ADB 68HC05 microcontroller chip performs 
keyboard scanning and ADB (Apple desktop bus) 
interface functions, and stores 256 bytes of parameter 
RAM (PRAM). The ADB chip also supplies control 
signals to the DFAC (Digital Filter Audio Chip) analog 
sound chip. When system power is off, the 68HC05 
receives power from the backup battery and operates as 
the real-time clock. 

The SWIM disk controller chip enables the 1.4 MB 
Apple FDHD/SuperDrive to read and write GCR (group- 
coded recording) and MFM (modified frequency 
modulation) data formats. Refer to the following 
section, "Apple FDHD/SuperDrive," for more 
information. 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Basics / 1 .7 




^\r 



Microswitches 



S 




yv 



Figure 1-5 Identifying the Apple FDHD/SuperDrive 



DRIVE 


MEDIA 


MEDIA FORMAT 


400K 
(GCR) 


800K 
(GCR) 


720K 
(MFM) 


1.4 MB 
(MFM) 


800K 
800K 
800K 


Single-Sided 

Double-Sided 

High-Density 


R/W/F 

R/W/F 

NR 


NR 

R/W/F 

NR 


X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 


FDHD 
FDHD 
FDHD 


Single-Sided 

Double-Sided 

High-Density 


R/W/F 

R/W/F 

X 


NR 

R/W/F 

X 


X 

R/W/F 
X 


X 
X 

R/W/F 



NR = Not Recommended 

R = Read 

W = Write 

F = Format 

X = Not Allowed 



Figure 1-6 Drive/Media Compatibility Matrix 



1 .8 / Basics 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 



Apple FDHD/ 
SuperDrive 



The Apple FDHD/SuperDrive is a high-density (1.4 MB), 
3.5-inch disk drive. In addition to high-capacity data 
storage, the Apple FDHD/SuperDrive provides data 
exchangeability between Apple (GCR data format) and 
MS-DOS (MFM data format) systems. The Apple 
FDHD/SuperDrive is also backward-compatible with the 
800K disk format. 



Identification 



Figure 1-5A. The Macintosh LC supports both 800K 
drives and the Apple FDHD/SuperDrive, but is shipped 
with SuperDrives only. To differentiate between 800K 
and 1.4 MB drives, remove the top case and locate the 
microswitches at the front of the drive. The Apple 
FDHD/SuperDrive has three microswitches; the 800K 
drive has only two microswitches. 



Figure 1-5B. You can also identify an Apple 
FDHD/SuperDrive by removing it from the Macintosh 
LC and checking the manufacturer's label on the bottom 
of the drive: all high-density drives have the note 2MB 
on the label. 



Drive/Media 
Compatibility 



Figure 1-6. Special 1.4 MB data disks are available that 
take full advantage of the increased data storage capacity 
of the Apple FDHD/SuperDrive. Apple does not 
recommend using 1.4 MB media in 800K disk drives, 
however, because data saved to high-density media using 
800K drives is unreliable and could be lost. 



CAUTION: High-density media (1.4 MB) are more 
susceptible to problems than are low-density media 
(400K/800K). To avoid media problems, use only known- 
good media or high-density media bearing the Apple label. 

800K drives can read, write, and format single- and 
double-sided media. The Apple FDHD/SuperDrive can 
read, write, and format single-sided (400K), double- 
sided (800K), and high-density media. In addition, the 
FDHD/SuperDrive can read, write, and format 720K and 
1.4 MB double-sided MFM-format media. 






Note: To help understand drive and media format 
compatibility, think in terms of the drive/media of 
lowest capacity. If your system has an internal 800K 
drive and an Apple FDHD/SuperDrive, to ensure media 
format compatibility between the two drives you must 
use 800K media (the drive and media of lowest capacity). 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Basics / 1 .9 



□ SPECIFICATIONS 



Processor 



MC68020 processor: 32-bit architecture with 256K data 
and instruction caches supporting burst reads 



Clock Frequency 



16 MHz 



Addressing 



32-bit internal registers 
1 6-bit address bus 



Coprocessor 
Memory 



None 



512K on a ROM SIMM 

2 MB RAM, expandable to 10 MB 

256 bytes of parameter memory 

256K of video RAM, expandable to 512K 



Slot Expansion 
Sound System 



96-pin processor-direct slot (PDS) 



Built-in speaker 

External stereo headphone jack that plays in mono 
Subset of Apple sound chip that enables sound 
recording, playback, and playthrough (mixing) 



Disk Drives 



Optional internal SCSI hard disk drive 

Up to seven external SCSI drives (if no internal 

SCSI drive is installed) 
Internal 1.4 MB, Apple FDHD/SuperDrive 

Optional second Apple FDHD/SuperDrive 



SCSI Port 



One external SCSI port (DB-25) 
One internal 50-pin SCSI connector 



Serial Ports 



Two RS-422/RS-232/AppleTalk® serial ports 
(mini DIN-8) 



1.10 /Basics 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 






Video Display 



Built-in video with external video port supports: 

Macintosh 12-Inch RGB Display at 8 bits/pixel with 
256K VRAM; Apple High-Resolution Monochrome 
Monitor, AppleColor™ High-Resolution RGB 
Monitor, and Macintosh 12-Inch Monochrome 
Display at 4 bits/pixel with 256K VRAM 



Keyboard 



Apple Keyboard, Apple Keyboard II, or Apple Extended 
Keyboard II connected through Apple Desktop Bus 
ports (Mini DIN-4) 



Mouse 



Apple Desktop Bus mouse (Mini DIN-4) 



Input Power 



100 to 240 volts AC RMS automatically configured 
50-60 Hz single-phase 
130 watts maximum 



System 
Output Power 



DC power: 30 watts maximum 



Clock/Calendar 
Operating Temperature 



CMOS custom chip with long-life lithium battery 



10° C to 40° C 
50° F to 104° F 



Storage Temperature 



-40° C to 47° C 
-40° F to 116.6° F 



Relative Humidity 



5% to 95% (noncondensing) 



Altitude 



to 3048 m (0 to 10,000 ft) 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Basics/ 1.11 



68020 
16 MHz 



I 



Main ROM 



(A21 :A2) 



(D31:D0) 



128Kx8 

ROM 

(Four 1 Mbit 

parts) 



(D31:D16) 



2X74LS245 



(A31, 
A23:A0) 



(A2:A1) 



(D31:D24) 



5-Wire 
Bus 



(A6.A4) 



Addr 



Data Built-in 
Video 
Chip 



Serial 
Interface 
to 85C80 



SCC 



85C80 

Combo 

Chip 



SCSI 



Battery 



ADB 
68HC05 

Micro- 
controller 

Chip 



(A 12:9) 



Reset 
NMI^ 



3 



(D31:D24) 



96-Pin Expansion Connector 



2 SIMMs for 
RAM Expansion 



2 MB RAM 
Soldered on PCB 



RAM Data Bus (16) 



VRAM 



Filter 



Video 

Connector 

(DB-15) 

(q ( o o o oVo o o o o o ) o) 



Color 

Look- Up 

Table 



"A 



Fixed Gain 
Speaker Amp 



DFAC 
Chip 



l - 



Headphone 
Jack 



A/D 



Amp AGS 
Filter 



26LS30 



26LS30 



26LS32 



50-pir 
Internal W' 
SCSI " 
Connector 



DFAC 
Control 




Internal 
8W8I Speaker 



Serial Port A 
(Mini-DIN 8) I 



Serial Port B 
(Mini-DIN 8) f 



External SCSI 
Connector (DB-25) 



— (^JVoooooooooy O/ 



ADB Port 
(Mini-DIN 4) 



Two Internal 
Floppy Ports (20-pin) 



SWIM 
Chip 



is ^u-pin; I 



ZEX 



fflBBBB 



35 



B 



ii iti;i;i;i; 



i: 



I 



External ADB Keyboard 



Mouse 



Figure 1-7 Macintosh LC Block Diagram 



1.12 /Basics 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 






□ THEORY OF OPERATION 



Introduction 



The Macintosh LC computer has three basic modules: the 
logic board, the power supply, and the disk drives. The 
computer can have one or two internal floppy disk 
drives, one internal SCSI hard disk drive, and up to six 
external SCSI devices (drives, scanners, etc.). 

The information here will give you an understanding of 
how the Macintosh LC works. This understanding, in turn, 
will assist you in performing logical troubleshooting. 
Figure 1-7 shows a block diagram of the Macintosh LC. 



System 
Startup 



When the computer is turned on, the system begins a 
carefully synchronized sequence of events. First the 
system software performs a memory test to determine 
how much RAM is present, and whether the RAM is 
good. 

The system then compiles separate 24-bit and 32-bit 
memory maps describing the current memory 
configuration. The 24-bit memory map allows existing 
Macintosh software to use a 24-bit address mode; the 
32-bit memory map enables new software to use the full 
32-bit address space. 

The memory management unit (MMU) is then 
programmed, based on the 24- and 32-bit memory maps, 
to provide contiguous logical memory from the 
potentially noncontiguous physical segments in bank A 
(bank B is empty) and the RAM SIMM expansion slots. 

At this point the disk startup process begins. The 
system looks for a readable disk in the available disk 
drives in the following order: 

1. Internal floppy disk drives 

2. Setup device set in the control panel 

3. SCSI devices in declining order of device ID (from 
6 to 0) 

Note: If the battery is removed or the contents of the 
parameter RAM are destroyed, the setup device defaults 
to the device with ID=0. 






The system then finds a readable disk, reads the disk, 
and completes the system startup process. 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Basics/ 1.13 



Logic Board 



The logic board is the heart of the system, the module 
that processes all information. Below is a list of the 
major components of the Macintosh LC logic board and 
the functions they perform. 



By using the block diagram in Figure 1-7 as you read 
through the various sections, you will get a clearer 
understanding of how the logic board works. 



Microprocessor 



The Macintosh LC contains a 68020 microprocessor, 
which is a true 32-bit processor but also supports 24- 
and 16-bit processing modes. The microprocessor runs 
at 16 MHz. When running in the 24-bit addressing 
mode, the Macintosh LC is compatible with the majority 
of existing Macintosh applications. 



RAM 



The random-access memory (RAM) interface on the logic 
board supports from 1 MB to 10 MB of RAM. The first 
10 megabytes of space available in main memory are 
reserved for RAM. 



The first two megabytes of RAM are in four 256x8 fast- 
page-mode DRAMs soldered onto the logic board. This 
RAM is called bank A. (Bank B on the logic board is 
shipped empty.) Bank A RAM cannot be changed by 
technicians. 

Two single in-line memory module (SIMM) sockets are 
provided for memory expansion. This expansion RAM 
sockets can be empty or can contain two SIMMs of the 
same density (two 1 MB SIMMs, for instance). 

RAM bank A and the two SIMM sockets do not occupy 
contiguous address space, as they do on most previous 
Macintosh products. The 68020 on-chip MMU joins the 
noncontiguous blocks of physical memory to contiguous 
logical memory for application software. 



1.14 /Basics 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 






If the VRAM (video RAM) SIMM does not contain any 
VRAM (the SIMM contains two transparent latches 
only), then on-board video operates out of main memory. 
Video data resides in a video frame buffer that is in the 
top-most megabyte of soldered RAM, thereby allowing 
the video address to be independent of memory size. 

If VRAM (256K or 512K) is installed on the VRAM 
SIMM, the video frame buffer is in the VRAM, and 
video accesses do not affect memory access. Video data 
can be fetched from VRAM without interrupting CPU 
access to main memory or to I/O devices. 



ROM The Macintosh LC contains 512K of nonvolatile read- 

only memory. The system ROMs contain the Macintosh 
Toolbox, operating system support, and self-tests. The 
ROMs are implemented on the Macintosh LC with four 
32-pin, 128Kx8 ROM chips. 



Built-in Video The built-in video chip provides support for VRAM 

Chip and for the Ariel color lookup table (CLUT). The video 

chip also includes a full-function VIA1 (versatile 
interface adapter) chip and VIA2 registers similar to 
those implemented in the Apple Sound Chip. 

If VRAM is not installed on the VRAM SIMM, the video 
chip uses data stored in a buffer frame in bank A of 
RAM memory to refresh screen video. The video chip 
requests this video data as needed and refreshes video 
in 32-bit bursts. If a video burst is in progress, CPU 
access to RAM bank A is delayed, which slows down 
the CPU. The RAM SIMM expansion slots are not 
affected by video refresh because the CPU has full 
access to these slots at all times (the expansion slots 
are connected directly to the CPU data bus). 

When a monitor is connected to the built-in video port, 
the monitor will ground certain pins on the connector. 
The grounding pattern allows the video chip to identify 
the type of monitor connected. The video chip 
automatically selects the appropriate pixel clock and 
sync timing parameters. If an unknown monitor is 
plugged in or no monitor is plugged in, built-in video 
output is halted. 



Macintosh LC Nov 90 Basics / 1 .15 



The video monitor connects to the Macintosh LC through 
a DB-15 female connector on the back of the CPU. The 
pinouts for this connector are shown in Table 1. 



Pin 


Signal 


Description 


Pin 


Signal 


Description 


1 


R.GND 


Red video ground 


9 


B.V. 


Blue video 


2 


R.V. 


Red video 


10 


ID3 


Monitor ID bit 3 


3 


CSYNC 


Composite H and V sync 


11 


GND 


CSYNC ground 


4 


ID1 


Monitor ID bit 1 


12 


VSYNC 


Vertical sync 


5 


G.V. 


Green video 


13 


B.GND 


Blue video ground 


6 


G.GND 


Green video ground 


14 


GND 


HSYNC return 


7 


ID2 


Monitor ID bit 2 


15 


HSYNC 


Horiz sync (VGA only, 
CSYNC otherwise) 


8 


- 


Not used 


Shell 


S.GND 


Shield ground 



Table 1 External Video Connector Pinouts 

Macintosh LC built-in video supports the following 
monitors: the Macintosh 12-Inch RGB Display (512 x 
384 screen); the Macintosh 12-Inch Monochrome 
Display, AppleColor Hi-Res RGB Monitor, and Apple Hi- 
Res Monochrome Monitor (640 x 480 screens); and VGA 
monitors (512 x 384 screen). Adding a 17-MHz 
oscillator will enable the Macintosh LC to support the 
Apple II monitors. 

When configured without VRAM on the VRAM SIMM, 
the built-in video chip supports 640 x 480 screens only, 
at 1 bit/pixel. With 256K of VRAM, the Macintosh LC 
can drive 640 x 480 and 560 x 384 screens at 4 
bits/pixel, and 512 x 384 screens at 8 bits/pixel. With 
512K of VRAM, the Macintosh LC can drive 640 x 480 
and 560 x 384 screens at 8 bits/pixel, and 512 x 384 
screens at 16 bits/pixel. 

The video signals generated by the built-in video chip 
pass through a CLUT (color lookup table) chip. The 
lookup table has 256 three-byte entries (one byte each 
for red, green, and blue). In monochrome mode, the 
same signal drives red, green, and blue. 



1.16/ Basics 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 



Input/Output 
Interfaces 



The input/output interfaces of the system include the 
serial ports, the SCSI port, the internal floppy disk, the 
ADB port, the sound system, and the expansion port. 
The following chips control these ports and their 
devices. 



SCC Chip 



The SCC (serial communications controller) chip, an 
8-MHz AMD 85C80, controls communications with the 
serial ports. This chip is also known as the combo chip 
because it combines the functions of the SCC and the 
SCSI controller into a single device. The 85C80 is 
transparent to operating software. 

The SCC portion of the 85C80 has two independent 
ports for serial communication. Each port can be 
independently programmed for asynchronous, 
synchronous, and AppleTalk protocols. The serial ports 
conform to EIA standard RS-422. These ports are used 
mainly for (though not limited to) connecting the 
Macintosh LC to networks, printers, and modems. 

To use the serial ports with RS-232 single-ended 
devices, use the RS-422 TxD- for the RS-232 TxD, RS- 
422 RxD- for the RS-232 RxD, and ground RxD+ to the 
SG pin (see Figure 1-8). 




Figure 1-8 Mini DIN-8 Connector 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Basics/ 1.17 



The second portion of the 85C80 combo chip is the 
small computer system interface (SCSI) controller. The 
SCSI portion of the 85C80 supports the SCSI as defined 
by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 
X3T9.2 Committee. This part of the device is compatible 
with the 53C80 controller used in the Macintosh II 
family. The rest of the SCSI interface consists of an 
internal 50-pin connector for connecting an internal 
SCSI drive, and an external DB-25 connector. 

The combo chip connects directly to the internal 50-pin 
connector and the external DB-25 connector, and the 
chip controls the high-speed parallel port for 
communicating with up to seven SCSI peripherals. (If 
you have an internal SCSI drive, you can have only six 
external SCSI devices.) The combo chip supports 
arbitration of the SCSI bus, including reselection. 

The 85C80 does not provide the internal SCSI disk 
drive with termination power; the drive provides the 
termination power. 



SWIM Chip The SWIM chip (Sanders- Woz integrated machine) 

controls the internal 3.5-inch floppy drive — the Apple 
FDHD/SuperDrive. The SWIM chip incorporates the 
functionality of the IWM chip (integrated Woz machine), 
and enables the high-capacity (1.4 MB) FDHD/ 
SuperDrive to read, write, and format in GCR and MFM 
data formats. 

The SWIM chip interprets, converts, and outputs dual- 
disk (clock/time) and file (data) signals as appropriate for 
either GCR (Apple 400K/800K) or MFM (MS-DOS 720K 
and 1.4 MB, and Apple 1.4 MB) data formats. This 
arrangement enables the FDHD to exchange data between 
Apple and MS-DOS® systems. For specific 
compatibilities between drives and media, see Figure 1-6. 

An application-specific translator within the Apple File 
Exchange utility program, or provided by third parties, 
must be used to translate the formatted data for use 
within an application program. 



1.18 /Basics Nov 90 Macintosh LC 



ADB 

Microcontroller 

Chip 



A custom Motorola 68HC05 microcontroller chip drives 
the external ADB bus and reads the status of the 
selected device. The Macintosh LC interfaces with the 
microcontroller chip via an improved, extended- 
handshake protocol with the VIA1 register in the built- 
in video chip. 

The ADB is a serial communication bus used to connect 
keyboards, mouse devices, graphic tablets, and other 
input devices to the system. It is a single-master, 
multiple-slave serial bus using an asynchronous 
protocol. The system microprocessor normally samples 
the state of each of the devices by using the control 
lines and shift register in VIA1 to read or write bytes 
over an internal serial link to the microcontroller. The 
microcontroller drives the external bus and reads the 
status of the selected device. 

Mini-DIN 4-pin ADB connectors connect ADB devices to 
the Macintosh LC. 

All devices made for the Apple Desktop Bus have a 
microprocessor that makes the devices intelligent. All 
ADB devices, except the mouse, have ports for 
connecting to other ADB devices. Because it has no 
port, the mouse must be the last device attached to the 
Apple Desktop Bus. 

There are three Macintosh Apple ADB keyboards — the 
Apple Keyboard, Apple Keyboard II, and Apple Extended 
Keyboard II. The keyboards connect to the Apple 
Desktop Bus port on the rear of the Macintosh LC. The 
keyboards have their own microprocessors, called 
keyboard microcontrollers. The keyboards operate 
asynchronously, issue commands on the ADB, and 
transmit and receive data to and from the ADB devices. 

The ADB microcontroller chip includes other functions 
that used to be provided by extra devices on the logic 
board. The microcontroller includes a real-time clock 
and parameter RAM, along with control bits for the soft 
power control circuit, power-on reset, and keyboard- 
controlled NMI functions. Each of these functions is 
described below. 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Basics/ 1.19 



Sound The Macintosh LC sound system includes an input jack, 

System a built-in speaker, and a stereo headphone jack that 

plays in mono. The system can record sounds digitally 
and includes a playthrough feature that permits the user 
to mix an external audio source with computer- 
generated sound and play the result through the 
speaker or headphone jack. 

The Macintosh LC uses main memory for the sound 
buffer. Sound data is written to memory and played 
back from memory using a first-in, first-out (FIFO) 
storage method incorporated into the built-in video 
chip. The FIFO address is a byte wide, and the sound 
buffer in main memory is 1022 bytes long. A DFAC chip 
(digital filter audio chip) controls all analog processing 
functions. Control bits for the DFAC are in a shift 
register loaded from the ADB microcontroller chip. 

The sound input circuit consists of an input jack; a 
preamplifier; a switched capacitor filter to provide 
input filtering; an analog-to-digital converter; a first-in, 
first-out memory to store the digitized data; and control 
logic that allows software to control the circuitry. 
Software uses sound control registers to control the 
storage of data and the generation of interrupts. The 
sound input control register controls the sample rate, 
the record/play bit, and write/diagnostic address to the 
FIFO memory. Sound samples can be made at 11 or 22 
KHz with 8-bit resolution. 

Sound input sources can be a microphone or an audio 
line, either of which plugs into the sound input jack on 
the rear of the computer. The input source should 
provide a 20-mV amplitude and a 600-Q input 
impedance. A line input source — such as a CD player, 
VCR, or tape player — provides a higher input level. 
Apple provides an attenuating adapter plug to decrease 
the level of these devices so that they are compatible 
with the Macintosh LC input. Apple also provides an 
elefctret microphone for users to digitize voice inputs. 



1 .20 / Basics Nov 90 Macintosh LC 



Electret microphones require a bias voltage. The 
Macintosh LC powers the electret via a bias voltage 
provided at the second tip of the input connector. This 
connection provides eight volts DC at up to 1 mA. This 
bias voltage has no effect on input devices with 
monophonic or stereo input plugs. However, plugging 
some types of amplifiers into the sound input jack 
instead of the sound output jack could damage the 
amplifier. 

CAUTION: The user must take care to ensure that the 
connections to the rear of the computer are correct. 
Incorrect connections could damage the Macintosh LC or 
the external equipment connected. __ 

The sound output circuit consists of the DFAC chip, 
which filters the pulse-width-modulated (PWM) signal 
and drives the internal speaker and headphone jack, and 
a separate amplifier that mixes the right and left 
channels before output. 



Expansion The Macintosh LC has one expansion slot that can accept 

Slot compatible expansion cards. 

The expansion bus connector is a 96-pin DIN-style 
three-row connector. The connector provides the 32-bit 
CPU data and address buses, DMA control signals, other 
CPU control signals, interrupt inputs, and status signals 
for future expansion. Additionally, the slot outputs +5 
V, +12 V, and -12 V DC, and 4 watts of DC power. The 
expansion card is installed horizontally, parallel to the 
main logic board. There is sufficient clearance for 
cooling air to flow between the boards. 



Macintosh LC Nov 90 Basics / 1 .21 



Power 
Supply 



The power supply operates on standard line voltage and 
outputs +5 V, +12 V, and -12 V DC voltages, which are 
used by the logic board, the internal devices, and the 
slots. 



CAUTION: It is extremely important that the ratings of the 
power supply not be exceeded. Exceeding the ratings 
will result in damage to the power supply and the logic 
board. See the specifications in this section for maximum 
ratings for the system. 



Power 
Control 



The Macintosh LC cannot be switched on or off from the 
keyboard. The user must use the on/off power switch 
located on the rear panel to turn system power on and 
off. 

The rear-panel power switch can be locked in an ON 
position, which allows the Macintosh LC to restart as 
soon as it detects AC power. In effect, when this 
switch is locked in the ON position and a power 
failure causes the unit to shut off, the Macintosh LC 
will start up as soon as power is reinstated. 

The Shut Down command in the Finder™ puts the 
power-off function under software control. This soft-off 
allows the computer to complete any pending activity. 
When the soft-off routine is completed, the monitor 
screen displays the dialog box "You may now shut 
down your Macintosh safely." The rear panel power 
switch must be used to switch off system power. 



Real-Time 
Clock 



The Macintosh LC real-time clock is incorporated in the 
ADB 68HC05 microcontroller chip. The microcontroller 
chip contains 256 bytes of RAM that are powered by a 
battery when external power is off. These RAM bytes 
are called parameter RAM (PRAM). Parameter RAM 
stores the configuration of ports, the clock setting, and 
other data that must be preserved even when system 
power is not available. 

The user accesses PRAM information through a new 
pseudo device command protocol for the 68HC05. This 
protocol is different from the protocols of previous 
Macintosh computers. Software can use the driver 
routines to access the clock and PRAM; however, 
software that attempts to access these hardware devices 
directly must be modified. 



1.22 /Basics 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 






Interrupt/ The Macintosh LC also provides a keyboard-initiated 

Reset Circuit nonmasked interrupt (NMI) and reset. To produce a 

NMI, press <Command> and the power button at the 
same time; to reset, press <Command>, <Control>, and 
the power button at the same time. 

Debugging software uses the NMI to stop an application 
and change to a debugger for low-level software and 
hardware testing. The NMI signal has an enable flag in 
the PRAM of the 68HC05. When the 68HC05 initially 
powers up, the flag is reset and the keyboard cannot 
generate the NMI. To use the debugging function, 
debugging software must set the enable flag in the 
PRAM so that the keyboard can generate the NMI. 

The NMI reset is a hard reset, identical to the power- 
on reset. All RAM contents are lost and the computer 
behaves as if it were just switched on. 






Macintosh LC Nov 90 Basics / 1 .23 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh LC 

Section 2 - Take-Apart 



□ CONTENTS 








2.2 


Electrostatic Discharge Prevention 




2.3 


Top Case 




2.5 


Hard Disk Drive 




2.7 


Fan/Speaker Assembly 




2.8 


Floppy Disk Drive 




2.9 


Power Supply 




2.11 


Main Logic Board 



Note: If a step is underlined, detailed instructions for 
that step can be found elsewhere in the section. 



Macintosh LC Nov 90 Take-Apart / 2.1 



□ ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE PREVENTION 



The Macintosh LC contains ROM and RAM memory 
(which is installed on small separate boards called 
SIMMs — single in-line memory modules) and CMOS 
components. The CMOS components and the SIMMs are 
very susceptible to damage from electrostatic discharge 
(ESD). 

Preventive measures must be taken to avoid ESD 
damage. When you unwrap, install, or replace modules, 
observe the appropriate ESD precautions. 

For complete ESD prevention information, refer to the 
You Oughta Know tab in the Apple Service Technical 
Procedures. 

If the proper ESD procedures are not available, then do 
the following: 

Turn off the power and disconnect the power cord. 
After removing the cover and before going near the 
logic board, touch the metal of the power supply case. 






2.2 / Take-Apart Nov 90 Macintosh LC 



□ TOP CASE 



Materials Required 



Medium Phillips screwdriver 



Remove 



1. Turn off the power. Disconnect the power cord and 
all cables from the rear of the computer. 

2. If necessary, remove the case screw (Figure 2-1). 

3. Lift up on the tabs at the back of the lid 
(Figure 2-1). Lift the top case straight up and off 
the bottom case. 




Figure 2-1 Removing the Top Case 



Replace 



1. Replace the front end of the top case on the front 
end of the bottom case, and swing the lid down 
toward the back of the unit. Press down on the 
back of the top case until you hear it click into 
place on the bottom case. 



2. Replace the case screw (Figure 2-1). 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Take-Apart/2.3 



J99 
Connector 



50-Pin 
Connector 



Release 
Tabs 



SCSI 
Cable 



Figure 2-2 Removing the Hard Disk Drive 



Release 
Tabs 




Mounting Screws 
Lockwashers 




HDA 
Carrier 



lechanism 



Figure 2-3 Installing the Drive Carrier 



2.4 / Take-Apart 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 



□ HARD DISK DRIVE 



Note: If you are replacing the hard disk drive, you will 
need a torque driver. Torque drivers are available at 
most hardware and automotive supply stores. 



Materials Required 



Medium Phillips screwdriver 
Torque driver 



Remove 



1. Remove the top case . 



2. Figure 2-2. Disconnect the HDA (hard disk 
assembly) power cable from connector J99 on the 
logic board. To remove this cable, you must release 
the locking tab on the side of the connector. 

3. Figure 2-2. Disconnect the SCSI cable from the 50- 
pin connector (JH) on the logic board. 

4. Figure 2-2. Release the two plastic tabs on one side 
of the hard drive, and lift the drive slightly. Repeat 
on the other side of the hard drive and remove the 
drive (with its mounting carrier) from the computer. 

Note: If you are replacing the hard drive, detach the 
HDA power cable and the SCSI cable from the bad drive. 
You will need these cables to connect the new drive. 

CAUTION: DO NOT loosen or remove any of the four torx 
screws that secure the black cover to the drive 
mechanism. Loosening or removing these screws can 
cause irreparable damage to the hard drive. 

5. Figure 2-3. If you are replacing the hard drive, 
remove the four Phillips screws and lockwashers 
securing the defective drive mechanism to its 
mounting carrier. 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Take-Apart / 2.5 



Replace If you are replacing a defective hard disk drive, begin 

with step 1. If you are simply reinstalling the same 
drive (which is already attached to the silver-colored 
mounting carrier), begin with step 5. 

1. Figure 2-3. Using the screw hole marked B, align 
the mounting carrier on the bottom of the new drive 
mechanism. Loosely fasten the carrier to the drive 
with the four lockwashers and Phillips screws. 

2. Figure 2-3. Using the torque driver and following 
the sequence shown in Figure 2-3, torque the four 
Phillips screws to 8.0 in-lbs. 

CAUTION: Be sure to use the Phillips screws that you 
removed in step 5 above and follow the installation 
sequence shown in Figure 2-3. Failure to do so can 
damage the drive. 

3. Connect one end of the SCSI cable to the hard drive. 

4. Connect the rectangular end of the the HDA power 
cable to the hard drive. 

5. Figure 2-2. Position the hard drive so the metal 
tabs on the carrier align with the four plastic 
release tabs on the bottom case. Push the drive into 
the bottom case until the drive snaps into place. 

6. Figure 2-2. Connect the SCSI cable to the 50-pin 
connector (Jll) on the logic board. 

7. Figure 2-2. Connect the square end of the power 
cable to connector J99 on the logic board. Be sure 
that the cable locks into place. 

8. Replace the top case . 



2.6 / Take-Apart Nov 90 Macintosh LC 



□ FAN/SPEAKER ASSEMBLY 



Remove 



1. Remove the top case . 



2. Release the plastic tab (Figure 2-4) on one end of 
the fan/speaker assembly, and lift the assembly 
slightly. Release the other plastic tab and remove 
the fan/speaker assembly from the bottom case. 




Release 
Tab 



Figure 2-4 Removing and Installing the Fan/Speaker Assembly 



Replace 



Insert the two tabs on the fan end of the fan/ 
speaker assembly (Figure 2-4) under the logic board. 
Push the assembly down until you hear it snap into 
place. 



2. Replace the top case . 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Take-Apart / 2.7 



□ FLOPPY DISK DRIVE 



Remove 



1. Remove the top case . 



2. Disconnect the floppy disk drive cable from connector J 13 
(Figure 2-5) on the logic board. 

3. Release the two plastic tabs (Figure 2-5) on one 
side of the disk drive, and lift the drive slightly. 
Repeat on the other side of the disk drive, and 
remove the drive from the computer. 

Note: If you are replacing the floppy disk drive, detach 
the floppy disk drive cable from the bad drive. You 
will need this cable to connect the new drive. 

Floppy Disk 
"rive 



Release 
Tabs 




Release 
Tabs 



Figure 2-5 Removing the Floppy Disk Drive 



Replace 



1. If necessary, connect the floppy disk drive cable 
(Figure 2-5) to the new floppy disk drive. 



2. Position the floppy disk drive so that the metal tabs 
on the drive carrier align with the plastic release 
tabs (Figure 2-5). Push the drive into the bottom 
case until the drive snaps into place. 

3. Connect the floppy disk drive cable to connector J13 
(Figure 2-5) on the logic board. 

4. Replace the top case . 



2.8 / Take- Apart 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 



□ POWER SUPPLY 



Remove 



1. Remove the top case . 



2. Disconnect the power supply cable from connector 
J27 (Figure 2-6) on the logic board. 

3. Release the two plastic tabs (Figure 2-6) that secure 
the front end of the power supply to the bottom 
case, and at the same time lift the power supply up 
and out of the case. 



Mounting 
Tabs 




Power Supply 
Cable 



Figure 2-6 Removing and Installing the Power Supply 



Replace 



1. Slide the back end of the power supply over the 
three plastic mounting tabs (Figure 2-6) at the rear 
of the bottom case. 



2. Push down on the power supply until it snaps into 
place. 

3. Connect the power supply cable to connector J27 
(Figure 2-6) on the logic board. 

4. Replace the the top case . 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Take-Apart / 2.9 



96-Pin 
Processor-Direct Slot 



J99 
HDA 
Power 
Connector 



J27 Power 

Supply 

Connector 




J13 Internal 
Disk Drive 
Connector 



J11 50-Pin 

SCSI 

Connector 



Figure 2-7 Disconnecting Connectors from the Main Logic Board 



Release Tabs 



Power On-Off Switch 



Logic Board 




J 28 Connector 



Figure 2-8 Removing the Main Logic Board 



2.10 /Take-Apart 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 



□ MAIN LOGIC BOARD 



Materials Required 



SIMM removal tool 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover and the fan/speaker assembly . 

2. Figure 2-7. Disconnect the following connectors 
from the logic board: 

• HDA power connector from connector J99 

• 50-pin SCSI connector from connector Jll 

• Internal disk drive connector from connector J13 

• Power supply connector from connector J27 

• Expansion card (if installed) from the 96-pin 
processor-direct slot 



3. Figure 2-8. Use your thumbs to spread the two 
plastic tabs that secure the logic board to the bottom 
case. At the same time, use your forefingers to 
slide the logic board toward the front of the case. 
(Use the 96-pin expansion connector and connector 
J27 to push back the logic board.) 

CAUTION: Be sure the power on/off button clears the rear 
panel before you lift the logic board out of the case. 

CAUTION: Because the oil from your skin can be harmful 
to the connectors, do not touch the "fingers" of the 
speaker/LED connector (J29) or connector J28 — located 
on the bottom side of the logic board. 

4. Gently lift the board completely out of the case. 

5. Use the SIMM removal tool (see the instructions in 
"SIMM Removal Tool" under the You Oughta Know 
tab) to remove any RAM SIMMs from the logic 
board. You will need to install these SIMMs on the 
new logic board. 

Note the size and number of the customer's RAM 
SIMMs. The customer must receive the same RAM 
SIMM configuration as was brought in. 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.11 



Logic Board 



Guide Pin 




Guide Pin 



Figure 2-9 Installing the Main Logic Board 



Replace 



1. Install the customer's RAM SIMMs onto the 
replacement logic board. 



2. Figure 2-9. Insert the logic board into the bottom 
case so that the round slots in the logic board fit 
over the plastic guide pins on the bottom of the 
case. 

3. Slide the logic board toward the rear of the case as 
far as it will go. The board will click into place. 

4. Figure 2-7. Connect the following connectors to the 
logic board: 

• Power supply connector to connector J27 

• Internal disk drive connector to connector J13 

• 50-pin SCSI connector to connector Jll 

• HDA power connector to connector J99 

• Expansion card (if removed) to the 96-pin 
processor-direct slot 

5. Replace the fan/speaker assembly and the top cover . 



2.12 /Take-Apart 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh LC 

Section 3 - Diagnostics 



□ CONTENTS 



Because the Macintosh Ilfx, Macintosh Ilsi, and 
Macintosh LC computers use the same diagnostics 
application (MacTest MP), diagnostics procedures for 
these products have been combined in the Macintosh 
Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in Volume II of the 
Macintosh Family Technical Procedures. 



Macintosh LC rev. Jan 91 Contents / 3.1 



* Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh LC 

Section 4 - Troubleshooting 



□ CONTENTS 








4.2 


Introduction 




4.2 


General Information 




4.2 


Before You Start 




4.2 


Error Chords 




4.2 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




4.3 


How to Use the Troubleshooting Flowcharts 




4.3 


Things to Remember 




4.5 


Module Exchange Information 




4.5 


Logic Board Configuration 




4.5 


Internal SCSI Hard Disk 




4.6 


Startup and Error Chords 




4.6 


Introduction 




4.6 


Startup Chord 




4.6 


Error Chords 




4.7 


Symptom Chart 




4.7 


Built-in Video Problems 




4.8 


Floppy Drive Problems 




4.8 


SCSI Problems 




4.9 


Peripheral Problems 




4.10 


Miscellaneous Problems 




4.12 


Macintosh LC Flowcharts 




4.12 


Flowchart 1 Notes 




4.14 


Flowchart 2 Notes 




4.16 


Flowchart 3 Notes 




4.17 


Flowchart 4 Notes 




4.18 


Flowchart 5 Notes 




4.20 


RAM SIMM Verification 




4.20 


Introduction 




4.20 


Verification Procedure 




4.21 


Battery Verification 




4.21 


Introduction 




4.21 


Verification Procedure 



Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.1 



□ INTRODUCTION 



General 
Information 



The following two disks can be used to test portions 
of the Macintosh LC: 



• MacTest MP (version 1.1 or higher) 

• Macintosh Hard Disk Test 

Use this troubleshooting section if you are unable to 
boot the MacTest MP disk, or if the disk is unable to 
detect a module failure in a suspected faulty system. 
After you repair the system, run MacTest MP again to 
verify system operation. 



Before 
You Start 



Read the subsections titled "Things to Remember," 
"Module Exchange Information," "Startup and Error 
Chords," "RAM SIMM Verification," and "Battery 
Verification" before you begin troubleshooting. You 
need the information provided in these subsections to 
troubleshoot the Macintosh LC effectively. 



Error Chords 



When switched on, the Macintosh LC executes a ROM- 
based self-test. If any part of the self-test fails, a 
sequence of chords follows the initial startup chord. To 
interpret this sequence of chords, refer to "Startup and 
Error Chords." 



How to Use 
the Symptom 
Chart 



To use the symptom chart, first find the symptom that 
most nearly describes the problem; then perform the 
first corrective action on the solution list. If that 
corrective action does not fix the problem, go to the 
next action. If you replace a module and find that the 
problem remains, reinstall the original module before 
you go to the next action. 

If the symptoms displayed by the Macintosh LC are not 
listed in the symptom chart, or if the system is not 
displaying a clearly defined problem, refer to 
"Macintosh LC Flowcharts." 

Afofe; When using the AppleColor High-Res RGB 
Monitor with the Macintosh LC the width of the raster/ 
image area will be reduced 3/1 6 inch from both sides of 
the screen. To correct this problem, adjust the 
horizontal size of the monitor (see the High-Res RGB 
Monitor Technical Procedures). 



4.2 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh LC 



How to Use the 

Troubleshooting 

Flowcharts 



There are five numbered flowcharts for the 
Macintosh LC. On completion of Flowchart 1, you 
will be instructed to continue to the next flowchart. 
Continue until you complete Flowchart 5. 

Each of the flowcharts includes references to notes that 
are above the flowchart or on the opposite page. These 
notes provide additional instructions or referrals to 
other procedures. 

Starting at the top of Flowchart 1, answer the questions 
and proceed down the chart. When you arrive at a 
rectangular box containing a list of actions, perform the 
actions in the sequence listed. On completion, return 
to the preceding diamond box. If the problem remains, 
reinstall the original module before you go on to the 
next action. 



□ THINGS TO REMEMBER 



ESD 



Follow all electrostatic discharge (ESD) 
precautions when working on the Macintosh LC. 
Refer to the You Oughta Know tab in the Apple 
Service Technical Procedures for additional 
information. 



Troubleshooting 
Hints 



2. If available, use a known-good monitor and 

monitor cable. Using them will isolate the problem 
to the CPU, internal drive, keyboard, or mouse. 



3. Mark each known-good SIMM module on the 

exchange logic board with white correction fluid or 
a small sticker to prevent confusion during the 
troubleshooting procedure. 



Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.3 



Before you begin troubleshooting, remove the 
expansion card (if installed) and disconnect any 
external devices (printers, SCSI devices, and/or 
ADB devices other than the keyboard and mouse). 

After the Macintosh LC has passed the diagnostic 
tests, each expansion card or peripheral must be 
installed and tested. Install one device and test the 
system before adding other devices. Repeat the 
install-and-test process until all devices have been 
installed and tested. 



i 



Normal 
Startup Tone 



5. Use a known-good copy of the MacTest MP disk. 

6. Perform the following quick checks: 

• Check the power source and power connection. 

• Check all cables and cable connections. 

• Check the adjustment of all user controls. 

• Check that no more than one system file is on 
the startup device/disk. 

• Check that the computer system and the system 
software are compatible. 

• Open the computer and verify that all circuit 
boards, fuses, and chips are secure, clean, and 
undamaged. 

7. During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
soft chord sounds. If you do not hear the chord, 
refer to "Startup and Error Chords" for additional 
information. 



System 
Configuration 



System Software 



To ensure that customers receive the same system 
configurations they bring in, record: 

• Type and number of floppy drives installed 

• Size of SCSI drive, if one is installed 

• RAM SIMMs installed, and sizes 

• Video RAM SIMM installed, and amount of video 

RAM 

• Type and serial number of expansion card 

Verify that the customer is using System 6.0.7 and 
Finder 6.1 or higher. Using earlier versions may 
destroy data or prevent the CPU from booting. 



4.4 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh LC 



□ MODULE EXCHANGE INFORMATION 



Logic Board 
Configuration 



Apple ships the Macintosh LC logic board service 
exchange module without RAM SIMMs and without the 
video RAM SIMM. To make sure that customers always 
receive the same logic board configurations they 
brought in, be sure to record the amount of memory 
installed and the size of the RAM SIMMs, and record 
the amount of video RAM on the video RAM SIMM if 
installed. 



All Macintosh LC logic boards ship with ROM memory. 
This memory is soldered onto the board at the locations 
marked UB2/LL, UC2/ML, UD2/MH, and UE2/HH 

(between the 96-pin expansion connector and the SIMM 
slots). When you return a defective Macintosh LC logic 
board, return it with the ROM, but without the RAM 
SIMMS and the video RAM SIMM. 



Internal SCSI 
Hard Disk 



Internal SCSI hard disk service modules do not include 
SCSI cables or SCSI power cables. These cables are 
sold as separate replacement parts. 

You must detach the SCSI cable and the SCSI power 
cable from the customer's defective drive and install 
them on the replacement drive. Be sure to keep these 
cables with the customer's Macintosh LC system. 



Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.5 



□ STARTUP AND ERROR CHORDS 



Introduction 



When the Macintosh LC is switched on, the ROM 
executes a self-test. If any part of the self-test fails, a 
special sequence of chords will sound. This sequence 
of error chords is interpreted below. 

If you are unable to interpret the chords using the 
following explanation, see "Macintosh LC Flowcharts" 
and ignore the question about the startup chord on 
Flowchart 1. 



Startup Chord 



During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
chord is the only sound emitted; then a disk icon 
appears on the screen. The disk icon will have a 
flashing question mark (if a startup disk is not found) 
or a smiling face (if a startup disk is found). 



Error Chords 



If a startup chord and additional chords sound, a failure 
occurred during the initial hardware self-tests. Three 
sequences play whenever an error occurs during 
startup: startup chord first; then the short, harsh error 
chord; followed closely by the test monitor chord 
sequence (four chords, from low to high). Following 
these chords, a blank gray screen usually appears. 



Initial Failure 



If you hear the above sequence, you have a hardware 
problem. To correct the problem: 



1. Exchange the RAM SIMMs. (Refer to "RAM SIMM 
Verification" in this section for complete 
instructions.) 

2. If RAM SIMM exchanges do not work, exchange the 
logic board. (Install the customer's RAM SIMMs on 
the exchange board.) 

3. If the system still does not work, you will need to 
perform the RAM SIMM verification with the 
exchange logic board. 



4.6 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh LC 



□ SYMPTOM CHART 



Built-in Video Problems Solutions 



Screen is dark, but 
audio and at least one 
drive operate, fan runs, 
LED is lit, and boot 
tone is normal 



1. Adjust brightness on monitor. 

2. Replace monitor. 

3. Replace video cable. 

4. Replace video RAM SIMMs. 

5. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 

6. Replace power supply. 



• Screen dark, no audio, 1. Remove expansion cards. 



no drive, but fan is 
running and LED 
is lit 


2. 
3. 

4. 
5. 


Partial or whole 
screen is bright and 
audio is present, but 
no video information 
is visible 


1. 
2. 
3. 


Screen is completely 
dark, fan is not 
running, and LED is 
not lit 


1. 

2. 
3. 



Remove all external peripherals. 

Replace SIMMs (refer to "RAM SIMM Verification" 

in this section). 

Replace logic board. 

Replace power supply. 



Replace video cable. 
Replace monitor. 
Replace logic board. 



Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Plug the monitor directly into the wall socket, and 

verify that the monitor has power. 

Remove expansion card. 

Remove all external peripherals. 

Replace power supply. 

Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Vertical or horizontal l. 

lines or snow appear 2. 

on screen, or screen is 3. 

completely dark, and 4. 

boot tone is normal 5. 



Replace video cable. 

Replace monitor. 

Replace video RAM SIMM. 

Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 

Replace power supply. 



Note: If replacing the monitor corrects the problem, 
refer to the appropriate Apple Service Technical 
Procedures to obtain monitor replacement information. 



Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.7 



Floppy Drive Problems 



Solutions 



Audio and video 
present but 
floppy drive 
does not operate 



1. Replace floppy disk drive cable. 

2. Replace floppy disk drive. 

3. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Disk ejects; display 
shows Mac icon 
with blinking "X" 



1. Replace disk with known-good disk. 

2. Replace floppy disk drive cable. 

3. Replace floppy disk drive. 

4. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Disk will not eject 



1. Switch off system and hold mouse button down 
while switching on. 

2. Try ejecting disk manually with paper clip. 

3. Replace floppy disk drive cable. 

4. Replace floppy disk drive. 



Drive attempts to 
eject disk, but 
doesn't 



1. Try pushing disk completely in. 

2. Try ejecting disk manually with paper clip. 

3. Check that front lid of case is completely on. 

4. Replace floppy disk drive. 



SCSI Problems 



Solutions 



• Internal hard drive 
accesses continuously 



1. Make sure the System is version 6.0.7 (or higher). 

2. Replace internal SCSI cable. 

3. Replace internal hard drive. 

4. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Internal hard drive 
will not operate 



1. Replace internal SCSI cable. 

2. Replace internal HDA power cable. 

3. Replace internal hard drive. 

4. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



4.8 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh LC 






Peripheral Problems 



Peripheral works with 
internal or external 
SCSI device but will 
not work with both 



Solutions 



1. Verify that SCSI select-level switch on external 
device is set to a different priority from that of 
internal device. 

2. Verify that both ends of SCSI drive are terminated. 

3. Replace terminator on the external device. 

4. Verify that terminator is installed on the internal 
SCSI drive. 

5. Replace SCSI device select cable. 






• Cursor does not move 



1. 

2. 
3. 



4. 



Reboot system. 

Check mouse connection. 

If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect the 

mouse to the rear ADB port instead and disconnect 

the keyboard. If mouse works, replace keyboard. 

If mouse does not work in the ADB port, replace 

mouse. 

Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Cursor moves, but l. 

clicking the mouse 2. 

button has no effect 



Replace mouse. 
Replace logic board. 



Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Cannot double-click 
to open an application, 
disk, or server 



1. Remove extra system files on the hard disk. 

2. Clear parameter RAM. Hold down the <Shift> 
<Option> <Command> keys and select Control Panel 
from the Apple menu. Reset mouse controls. 

3. If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to 
the rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, replace 
keyboard. 

4. If mouse does not work in the ADB port, replace 
mouse. 

5. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



No response to any 
key on the keyboard 



1. Make sure the System is version 6.0.7 (or higher). 

2. Check keyboard connection to ADB port. 

3. Replace keyboard cable. 

4. Replace keyboard. 

5. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.9 



Known-good 
ImageWriter or 
ImageWriter II 
will not print 


l. 

2. 
3. 

4. 
5. 


Known-good 
LaserWriter 


1. 


will not print 


2. 
3. 



Make sure the Chooser and the Control Panel are 

set correctly. 

Make sure the System is version 6.0.7 (or higher). 

Check printer DIP switches. 

Replace printer interface cable. 

Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Make sure the Chooser and the Control Panel are 
set correctly. 

Make sure the System is version 6.0.7 (or higher). 
Refer to the Networks tab in the Apple Service 
Technical Procedures for more information. 



Miscellaneous Problems Solutions 



System shuts down 
intermittently 



1. 



2. 
3. 

4. 

5. 



Make sure air vents on the top and sides of the 

top cover are clear. Thermal protection circuitry 

may shut down the system. After 30 to 40 minutes, 

the system should be OK. 

Replace power cable. 

Replace power supply. 

Replace SIMMs (refer to "RAM SIMM Verification" 

in this section). 

Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



System intermittently 
crashes or locks up 



1. 

2. 
3. 



5. 



Make sure the System is version 6.0.7 (or higher). 
Make sure application software is known-good. 
Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 
Replace SIMMs (refer to "RAM SIMM Verification" 
in this section). 
Replace power supply. 



System intermittently 
doesn't power on 



1. Check cables. 

2. Plug the monitor directly into the wall socket and 
verify that the monitor has power. 

3. Try a known-good keyboard and ADB cable. 

4. Replace power cord. 

5. Check batteries (refer to "Battery Verification" in 
this section). 

6. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



4.10 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh LC 






Clicking, chirping, 
or thumping sound 



1. Replace power supply. 

2. Disconnect hard disk; replace if noise disappears. 

3. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



No sound from 
speaker 



1. Verify that the volume setting in the Control Panel 
is set to 1 or above. 

2. Replace speaker. 

3. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



• Clock not 
running 



1. Replace battery (see "Battery Verification" in this 
section). 

2. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



System seems to 
boot; then message 
"Finder is old version' 
displays 



1. Clear parameter RAM by holding down the 
<Command> <Option> <p> <r> keys and restarting 
the system. Continue to hold these keys down. You 
will hear the normal startup chords and about two 
seconds later you will hear another chord. This 
second chord means the parameter RAM has been 
cleared. 

2. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.11 



□ MACINTOSH LC FLOWCHARTS 



Flowchart 1 
Notes 



1. During a normal startup sequence, a medium- 
pitched soft chord is emitted. If this does not 
happen, refer to "Startup and Error Chords" for 
additional information. If you cannot interpret the 
chords, continue with the flowchart. 



2. If exchanging the monitor will correct the problem, 
refer to the appropriate monitor technical 
procedures to isolate the monitor problem to the 
module level. 

3. Refer to "RAM SIMM Verification" for complete 
instructions on verifying and troubleshooting the 
SIMMs. 

4. If the known-good SIMMs do not correct the 
problem, install the customer's SIMMs on the 
replacement logic board. 



4.12 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh LC 






( Flowchart 1) 



Switch on the system 
without installing a disk. 



Interpret error 

chords. (See 

Note #1.) 




1. Exchange SIMMs. 
(See Note #3.) 

2. Exchange logic board. 
(See Note #4. 

3. Exchange power supply. 



c 



i 



Go to Flowchart 4. 



j 



c 



Go to Flowchart 3. 



j 



Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.13 



Flowchart 2 1. Refer to the MacTest MP section of the Macintosh 

Notes Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh 

Family Technical Procedures for complete 

information. 

2. Refer to the SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures for complete instructions. 

3. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



4.14 / Troubleshooting rev. Jan 91 Macintosh LC 






Shut down and install 

another MacTest MP 

disk. Switch power on. 




YES 



Switch power off. If a hard disk is 

installed, remove the SCSI power 

and cable connector. 



i 



Insert MacTest MP disk. 
Switch power on. 




Run MacTest MP. (See Note #1 .) 



c 



T 



Go to Flowchart 5, 



j 



( Flowchart 2 ) 



Insert MacTest MP disk. 




Run MacTest MP. (See Note #1.) 



i 



Run Macintosh Hard Disk Test. (See Note #2.) 



"XT 

( END ) 



1 



Run MacTest MP. (See Note #1 .) 



i 



Run Macintosh Hard Disk Test. (See Note #2.) 



TIT 

( end) 



1. 


Exchange drive cable. 


2. 


Exchange drive. 


3. 


Exchange power supply. 


4. 


Exchange logic board. 




(See Note #3.) 



Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.15 



Flowcharts 
Notes 



1. If exchanging the monitor will correct the 

problem, refer to the appropriate monitor technical 
procedures to isolate the monitor problem to the 
module level. 



2. Refer to "RAM SIMM Verification" for complete 
instructions on verifying and troubleshooting the 
SIMMs. 

3. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



( Flowchart 3 ) 




1 . Exchange power supply. 

2. Exchange logic board. 
(See Note #3.) 



c 



Go to Flowchart 4 



j 





V 


1. 


Exchange monitor. 




(See Note #1.) 


2. 


Exchange video cable. 


3. 


Exchange SIMMs. 




(See Note #2.) 


4. 


Exchange logic board. 




(See Note #3.) 


5. 


Exchange power supply. 



4.16 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh LC 






Flowchart 4 
Notes 



1. Refer to the MacTest MP section of the Macintosh 
Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh 
Family Technical Procedures for complete 
information. 



Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



( Flowchart 4 ) 



i 



Insert MacTest MP disk. 
Switch on or reboot. 




1. Exchange drive cable. 

2. Exchange disk drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board. 
(See Note #2.) 



Run MacTest MP. (See Note #1.) 



Q Go to 



i 



Flowchart 5. 



3 



Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.17 



Flowchart 5 
Notes 



1. Refer to the MacTest MP section of the Macintosh 
Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh 
Family Technical Procedures for complete 
information. 



2. Refer to SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures for complete instructions. 

3. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 

4. Customers must always get back the same system 
configurations they bring in. Refer to "Module 
Exchange Information" in this section. 



4.18 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh LC 



( Flowchart 5 ) 



Switch power off. Reconnect 

the SCSI drive (if installed). 

Switch power on. 




1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 


Exchange SCSI power and 
connector cable. 
Exchange SCSI drive. 
Exchange power supply. 
Exchange logic board. 
(See Note #3.) 



Insert MacTest MP disk. Switch power on. 




1. 


Exchange SCSI power and 




connector cable. 


2. 


Exchange SCSI drive. 


3. 


Exchange power supply. 


4. 


Exchange logic board. 




(See Note #3.) 



Run MacTest MP. (See Note #1 .) 



I 



Run Macintosh Hard Disk Test. 
(See Note #2.) 



I 



Check that customer has correct 
configuration. (See Note #4.) 



I 



( end) 






Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.19 



Q RAM SIMM VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



The service exchange logic board ships without RAM 
SIMMs. 



The RAM SIMMs installed on the customer's logic board 
may be defective. To verify a defective RAM SIMM, 
you must remove all the customer's RAM SIMMs and 
install known-good RAM SIMMs. Mark each known- 
good RAM SIMM with a dot of white correction fluid or 
a small sticker. Whatever you use, be sure it will not 
come off while you are testing. 



Materials Required 



Two known-good 1 MB SIMMs 
SIMM removal tool 



Verification 
Procedure 



1. Remove the top case . 



CAUTION: Before removing the SIMMs, be sure to use 
proper ESD procedures to prevent damage to the logic 
board. If an ESD pad is not available, touch bare metal 
on the power supply before proceeding. 

2. Remove the customer's RAM SIMMs by using the 
SIMM removal tool. See the You Oughta Know tab 
for SIMM tool use. 

3. Install two known-good RAM SIMMs. 

Note: Use only RAM SIMMs with 120 ns (or faster) 
fast-page-mode DRAM chips. 

4. Switch on the system. If you hear the normal 
startup sequence, the system works properly; you 
can proceed to test the customer's RAM SIMMs. 

5. Switch the system off, remove one of the known- 
good SIMMs, and install one of the customer's 
SIMMs. 

6. Switch on the system. If you hear the normal 
startup sequence, the customer's RAM SIMM is good. 

7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 to test the other RAM SIMMs. 
Be sure to set defective RAM SIMMs where they 
will not be mixed up with good ones. 



4.20 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh LC 






□ BATTERY VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



The Macintosh LC logic board contains one lithium 
thionyl chloride battery. This battery maintains the 
clock and PRAM while the unit is powered off. 

WARNING: Lithium batteries, the type used in the 
Macintosh LC, have some potential for explosion if 
improperly handled. Follow the verification procedure 
exactly 



Materials Required 



Voltmeter 



Verification 
Procedure 



1. Be sure power is off. Then remove the top case . 

2. Set the voltmeter range to measure 10 volts DC. 

3. Touch and hold the positive probe of the voltmeter 
to the positive side of the battery (Figure 4-1). 







5. 



Figure 4-1 Verifying Battery Voltage 

Touch and hold the ground probe of the voltmeter to 
the negative side of the battery. 

The reading for a good battery should be above 2.8 
volts. If the reading falls below 2.8 volts, replace 
the battery. Refer to Section 5, Additional 
Procedures, for replacement instructions. 



Macintosh LC 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.21 



« Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh LC 

Section 5 - Additional Procedures 



□ CONTENTS 








5.2 


Battery Replacement 




5.2 


Introduction 




5.5 


Materials Required 




5.5 


Remove 




5.5 


Replace 




5.7 


Logic Board RAM Identification and Upgrades 




5.7 


Introduction 




5.7 


Identification 




5.7 


Upgrades 



Note: If a step is underlined, instructions for that step 
can be found in Section 2, Take- Apart. 



Macintosh LC Nov 90 Additional Procedures / 5.1 



□ BATTERY REPLACEMENT 

Introduction Lithium thionyl chloride batteries, the type used in the 

Macintosh LC, have some potential for explosion or 
overheating if improperly handled. The following 
precautions should be taken when storing, handling, or 
disposing of lithium batteries: 

• Store lithium batteries in a designated, well-marked 
area with limited access. 

• Apple's lithium batteries are sealed in individual 
zip-lock wrappers. Upon receipt, inspect the 
batteries for integrity of their wrappers. Store 
batteries in the same packaging in which they were 
received or in a similar closed, heavy plastic bag. 

• Lithium batteries cannot be recharged. Do not 
attempt to recharge the battery. Doing so may cause 
the battery to overheat or explode. 

• Do not allow the leads or terminals to short-circuit. 
A short-circuited battery may overheat or explode. 

• Replace the battery with the correct Apple 
replacement battery only. Using an incorrect 
battery or a non-Apple battery may cause the battery 
to overheat or explode. 

• When installing the battery, ensure the correct 
polarity. The polarity markings on the battery must 
match those on the battery holder or circuit board. 
Failure to observe correct polarity may cause the 
battery to overheat or explode. 

• If the battery holder has a cover, be sure to replace 
the cover. 

• If the dead battery has leads, remove them before 
disposing of the battery. 

• Do not dispose of the battery in a fire or 
incinerator. Doing so may cause the battery to 
explode. Instead, follow the disposal instructions 
on the next page. 



5.2 / Additional Procedures Nov 90 Macintosh LC 






• In addition to its explosive potential, lithium is 
water-reactive and must be disposed of as a 
hazardous waste, as follows: 

Place the dead battery into the zip-lock wrapper 
and packaging from which you took the replacement 
battery. Mark the battery package DEAD and return 
it to Apple for proper disposal Exception : If the 
battery is physically damaged (for example, it is 
leaking), do not return it to Apple; dispose of the 
battery locally according to your local ordinances. 

The long-life lithium battery in the Macintosh LC 
should serve many years. Refer to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, to check the condition of the battery. 
If the battery fails, replace it according to the 
following procedure. 



Macintosh LC Nov 90 Additional Procedures / 5.3 




Figure 5-1 Replacing the Battery 



5.4 / Additional Procedures 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench and wriststrap 
Small, flat-blade screwdriver 

CAUTION: Use ESD precautions before removing or 
replacing the battery. Failure to do so may result in logic 
board failure. 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 

2. Figure 5-1A. Locate the battery holder and battery 
toward the center of the logic board. 

3. Figure 5-1 A. On one side of the battery holder, 
insert a small flat-blade screwdriver into the top of 
the holder and gently push the screwdriver down 
until the side tab pushes out. The battery holder 
cover will come loose; do the same on the other end 
and remove the cover from the holder. 

4. Figure 5-1B. Grasp the battery between your thumb 
and forefinger and lift it out of the holder. 



Replace 



1. Figure 5-1B. Insert the new battery so the positive 
side of the battery is inserted into the positive- 
marked side of the holder. 

CAUTION: Be sure the positive side of the battery is in the 
correct location (see Figure 5-1). An incorrectly placed 
battery can damage the logic board. 

2. Replace the holder cover. 

3. Replace the top cover . 

4. Set the clock using the Control Panel. 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.5 



Bank A 
DRAM 




Expansion 

SIMM 

Slots 



Figure 5-2 Macintosh LC Logic Board 



5.6 / Additional Procedures 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 



□ LOGIC BOARD RAM IDENTIFICATION AND UPGRADES 



Introduction 



The Macintosh LC contains 2 megabytes of DRAM chips 
soldered on the logic board in bank A (Figure 5-2). (No 
DRAM chips are soldered in Bank B on the logic board.) 
Additional RAM can be installed in packages known as 
single in-line memory modules (SIMMs). A SIMM is a 
small circuit board with DRAM chips that may be either 
surface-mounted or mounted through the board. Each 
SIMM board has contacts on one edge that fit into 
sockets on the logic board. The Macintosh LC has two 
SIMM sockets. 



CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to damage from 
ESP and skin acid. Handle only by the edges! 



Identification 



Only 1 MB SIMMs are currently available from Apple 
for the Macintosh LC. The Macintosh LC does not 
support 256K SIMMs. 



You must use 120 ns (or faster) SIMMs on the 
Macintosh LC. You can mix SIMMs of different speeds 
(for example, you can use a 1 MB, 80 ns SIMM with a 1 
MB, 120 ns SIMM), as long as neither of the SIMMs is 
slower than 120 ns. Slower SIMMs will cause serious 
timing problems. The RAM speed is usually indicated 
by the -xx number after the manufacturer's part number. 
For example, -8 indicates 80 ns SIMMs and -12 
indicates 120 ns SIMMs. 

Note: When you remove SIMMs from the logic board, 
use the SIMM removal tool. Instructions for using this 
tool are under the You Oughta Know tab. 



Upgrades 



The following chart summarizes the memory 
configurations that the Macintosh LC supports: 



RAM 


Bank A 


SIMM Sockets 


2 MB 


2 MB soldered RAM 


Empty 


4 MB 


2 MB soldered RAM 


Two 1 MB SIMMs 






CAUTION: Other configurations, such as a single SIMM 
or a pair of different-size SIMMs, will not function correctly. 



Macintosh LC 



Nov 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.7 



« Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh LC 

Illustrated Parts List 



□ CONTENTS 



IPL.3 Macintosh LC - System Exploded View 
(Figure 1) 



The figures and lists in this section include all piece 
parts that can be purchased separately from Apple for the 
Macintosh LC, along with their part numbers. These are 
the only parts available from Apple. Refer to your Apple 
Service Programs manual for prices. 



Macintosh LC Nov 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.1 




(is; [g) © 

Figure 1 Macintosh LC - System Exploded View 



IPL2/ Illustrated Parts List 



Nov 90 



Macintosh LC 






□ MACINTOSH LC- 


- SYSTEM EXPLODED VIEW (Figure 1) 


Item 


Part No. 


Description 


i 


630-0505 


Top Case 


2 


805-1527 


Disk Drive Slot Cover Shield 


3 


815-1164 


Disk Drive Slot Cover 


4 


699-5071 


Microphone Assembly 


5 


590-0524 


Cable, 1.4 MB FDHD, Internal 


6 


805-5111 


FDHD Carrier 


7 


661-0474 


1.4 MB Mechanism, Disk Drive 


8 


844-0018 


Screw, FDHD Carrier to FDHD 


9 


630-0500 


Bottom Case 


10 


630-5058 


Speaker/Fan Assembly 


11 


865-0066 


Platinum Foot 


12 


661-0614 


HDA, 1" Internal, 40 MB, 3.5 SCSI 


13 


444-6104 


Screw, 6 - 32 x 0.250 (HDA carrier to HDA) 


14 


805-0980 


HDA Carrier 


15 


590-0303 


Cable, HDA, Power 


16 


590-0228 


Cable, HDA, Internal 


17 


805-0137 


Rear Case Access Cover Shield 


18 


815-1154 


Rear Case Access Cover 


19 


742-0011 


Lithium Battery (without leads) 


20 


661-0593 


Logic Board 


21 


661-0609 


VRAM, SIMM, 256K, 100 ns 


22 


661-0403 


SIMM, 1 MB, 120 ns 




661-0410 


SIMM, DIP, 1 MB, 120 ns 


23 


661-0594 


Power Supply 


24 


590-0380 


Cable, AC Power, 110 V, Smoke 


25 


430-1031 


Screw, Cover 



Macintosh LC Nov 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.3 






# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llsi 

Technical Procedures 



□ TABLE OF CONTENTS 




Section 1 - 


1.2 


Product Description 


Basics 


1.2 


Features 




1.2 


Macintosh llsi Configurations 




1.3 


Connector Identification 




1.3 


Back Panel 




1.4 


Internal Connectors 




1.5 


Module Identification 




1.6 


Macintosh llsi System Features 




1.6 


Macintosh llsi Logic Board 




1.8 


Apple FDHD/SuperDrive 




1.11 


Specifications 




1.13 


Theory of Operation 




1.13 


Introduction 




1.13 


System Startup 




1.15 


Logic Board 




1.19 


Input/Output Interface 




1.23 


Real-Time Clock 




1.23 


Power Control 




1.24 


Power Supply 




1.25 


Fuses 




1.25 


Internal Floppy Disk Drives 




1.25 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 




1.25 


Expansion Slot 


Section 2 - 


2.2 


Electrostatic Discharge Prevention 


Take-Apart 


2.3 


Top Cover 




2.5 


Adapter Card and 030 Direct Slot Card 




2.7 


Adapter Card, Bracket, and NuBus Card 




2.8 


Fan 




2.9 


Power Supply 




2.10 


Hard Disk Drive 




2.13 


Floppy Disk Drive 




2.14 


Main Logic Board 




2.17 


Speaker 



Macintosh llsi 



rev. Jan 91 



Contents / i 



Section 3 - 


Refer to the MacTest MP section under theMacintosh 


Diagnostics 


Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh 




Family Apple Service Technical Procedures. 


Section 4 - 


4.2 


Introduction 


Troubleshooting 


4.2 


General Information 




4.2 


Before You Start 




4.2 


Error Chords 




4.2 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




4.3 


How to Use the Troubleshooting Flowcharts 




4.4 


Things to Remember 




4.5 


Module Exchange Information 




4.5 


Logic Board Configuration 




4.5 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 




4.6 


Startup and Error Chords 




4.6 


Introduction 




4.6 


Startup Chord 




4.6 


Error Chords 




4.7 


Symptom Chart 




4.7 


Built-in Video Problems 




4.8 


Floppy Drive Problems 




4.8 


SCSI Problems 




4.9 


Peripheral Problems 




4.10 


Miscellaneous Problems 




4.12 


Macintosh Ilsi Flowcharts 




4.12 


Flowchart 1 Notes 




4.14 


Flowchart 2 Notes 




4.16 


Flowchart 3 Notes 




4.17 


Flowchart 4 Notes 




4.18 


Flowchart 5 Notes 




4.20 


RAM SIMM Verification 




4.20 


Introduction 




4.20 


Verification 




4.22 


Battery Verification 


Section 5 - 


5.2 


Battery Replacement 


Additional Procedures 


5.2 


Introduction 




5.3 


Materials Required 




5.6 


Logic Board RAM Identification and Upgrades 




5.6 


Introduction 




5.6 


Identification 




5.6 


Upgrades 



I 






ii / Contents 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Illustrated IPL.3 Macintosh Ilsi - System Exploded View 

Parts List (Figure 1) 

IPL.5 Adapter Cards (Figure 2) 



©Apple Computer, Inc., 1990 and 1991. No portion of this document may be reproduced in any 

form without the written permission of Apple Computer, Inc. 
FDHD, Apple Desktop Bus, SuperDrive, AppleColor, QuickDraw, MacTest MP, and Finder are 

trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 
Macintosh, A/UX, AppleTalk, Apple, and the Apple logo are registered trademarks of Apple 

Computer, Inc. 
UNIX® is a registered trademark of AT&T Information Systems. 
NuBus™ is a trademark of Texas Instruments. 
MS-DOS® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. 



Macintosh Ilsi rev. Jan 91 Contents / 



fk Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llsi 

Section 1 - Basics 



□ CONTENTS 








1.2 


Product Description 




1.2 


Features 




1.2 


Macintosh llsi Configurations 




1.3 


Connector Identification 




1.3 


Back Panel 




1.4 


Internal Connectors 




1.5 


Module Identification 




1.6 


Macintosh llsi System Features 




1.6 


Macintosh llsi Logic Board 




1.8 


Apple FDHD/SuperDrive 




1.11 


Specifications 




1.13 


Theory of Operation 




1.13 


Introduction 




1.13 


System Startup 




1.15 


Logic Board 




1.19 


Input/Output Interface 




1.23 


Real-Time Clock 




1.23 


Power Control 




1.24 


Power Supply 




1.25 


Fuses 




1.25 


Internal Floppy Disk Drives 




1.25 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 




1.25 


Expansion Slot 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Basics/ 1.1 



□ PRODUCT DESCRIPTION 



Features 



i 



The Macintosh® Ilsi is a high-performance, open- 
architecture Macintosh computer with the following 
features: 



68030 microprocessor 

Runs at 20 MHz 

Built-in video support (up to eight-bit) 

512K of ROM 

2 MB RAM, upgradeable to 17 MB 

Sound input and output capabilities 

A unique expansion slot that can be configured as 

either a NuBus™ slot or an 030 Direct Slot 

An optional floating-point math coprocessor 

A locking power switch 



Macintosh Ilsi 
Configurations 



The Macintosh Ilsi comes in two configurations: 

• 2 MB of RAM, one Apple® FDHD™/SuperDrive™, 
and one 40 MB hard drive 

• 5 MB of RAM, one Apple FDHD/SuperDrive, and one 
80 MB hard drive 



Enhancements 



The following enhancements can be added: 



Up to six external SCSI drives and either the 800K, 
3.5-inch disk drive or the 1.4 MB FDHD/SuperDrive 
(The Macintosh Ilsi does not support 400K drives 
and requires the HD20 driver to support the HD20.) 

Apple® low-profile, 3.5-inch internal SCSI hard disk 
drive with 40 or 80 MB 






1 .2 / Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Ilsi 






□ CONNECTOR IDENTIFICATION 



Back 
Panel 



The back panel of the Macintosh Ilsi has the 

following built-in ports and connectors (see Figure 1-1). 



AC power connector 

Switched (courtesy) monitor connector 

Expansion slot for either a NuBus card or an 030 

Direct Slot card 

Apple Desktop Bus™ 

External disk drive port 

Video port 

SCSI port 

Serial port 1 

Serial port 2 

Stereo sound-out port 

Sound input port 

Locking power switch 

Security lock 



AC Power Monitor 
Connector Connector 



Expansion Card Slot 




Security 
Lock 



Sound 

Input 
Port 

Locking Stereo 

Power Sound-Out 
Switch p or t 



Video 

Port Disk Desktop 

Drive Bus 

Port 



External Apple 
ktc 



Figure 1-1 Back Panel 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Oct 90 



Basics / 1 .3 



Internal 
Connectors 



The Macintosh Ilsi logic board has the following 
connectors and jumpers (see Figure 1-2): 



Expansion slot connector 

ROM SIMM connector 

Four RAM SIMM connectors 

Battery 

Fan connector 

Power supply connector for the logic board 

ROM jumper 

Internal disk drive connector 

Internal SCSI connector 

Speaker/LED connector 

Power connector for internal SCSI hard drive 



Expansion ROM RAM 

Slot SIMM SIMM Fan 

Connector Connector Connectors Battery Connector 




Back of Board 

DD 



^ra OO o~ 

ooo 

1111b 



8 



flBflDgm 



O 



SCSI Speaker/LED Internal 


Internal 


ROM 


Power 


Power Connector SCSI 


Disk Drive 


Jumper 


Supply 


Connector (Bottom Connector 


Connector 




Connector 


Side) 









Figure 1-2 Logic Board 






1 .4 / Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Ilsi 






□ MODULE IDENTIFICATION 



Figure 1-3 shows the major modules of the Macintosh 
Ilsi. 



Top Cover 



Expansion 
Card & Bracket 



SCSI 

Hard Disk 

Drive 




Logic 
Board 



Bottom 
Cover 



Floppy 
Drive 



Speaker 






Figure 1-3 Modules 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Oct 90 



Basics / 1 .5 



□ MACINTOSH llsi SYSTEM FEATURES 

The Macintosh llsi includes the following components: 

• Motorola 68030 microprocessor running at 20 MHz 

• 512K of ROM 

• RBV (RAM-based video chip) 

• MDU (memory decode unit) 

• An optional adapter card for installing a NuBus card 
or an 030 Direct Slot card 



Macintosh llsi At the heart of the Macintosh llsi is the Motorola 

Logic Board 68030 microprocessor (Figure 1-4). The 68030 is a true 

32-bit microprocessor that is fully compatible with 
earlier 16- and 24-bit Macintosh microprocessors. This 
high-performance microprocessor runs at 20 MHz and is 
designed to handle paged memory management, thereby 
eliminating the HMMU (or PMMU). With this increased 
speed, and by taking advantage of the 68030 burst 
access capability (which enables the CPU to read groups 
of instructions or data in fewer clock cycles than in 
normal access mode), the Macintosh llsi is a very high 
performance system. 

The ROM on the Macintosh llsi logic board includes 
code that supports the built-in video, parity, virtual 
memory (used on A/UX® systems), and 32-bit 
QuickDraw™. The code supports future upgrades to the 
Macintosh operating system. 

The Macintosh llsi has two possible locations for the 
ROM — two ROM chips that are soldered to the logic 
board or a ROM SIMM in a connector on the logic board 
(Figure 1-4). If a ROM jumper is not installed, the 
computer uses the ROM on the two soldered chips; if a 
ROM jumper is installed, the computer uses the ROM on 
the ROM SIMM. (However, if a ROM jumper is 
installed and no ROM SIMM is present, the computer 
defaults back to the ROM on the two chips.) 

Having the RBV (RAM-based video) chip on the logic 
board enables the Macintosh llsi to drive a 640 x 480 
screen at up to 8 bits/pixel and a 640 x 870 screen at 
up to 4 bits/pixel without the need for a video card. 
The chip uses a section of the RAM as a screen frame 
and retrieves the video data, which is then converted 
for display by a video DAC (digital-to-analog converter) 
and sent out through the DB-15 video port. 



1 .6 / Basics rev. Feb 91 Macintosh llsi 






SWIM 



Video RR w MDU 
Port RBV 




ROM BankB 68030 ' ROM Bank A 

SIMM RAM Microprocessor HOM Jumper RAM 

Socket 






Figure 1-4 Logic Board 

The MDU (memory decode unit) decodes device 
selection for the physical address map, and addresses 
both banks of RAM memory. This chip allows larger 
amounts of memory to be installed in bank B. 

The SWIM chip enables the Apple FDHD drive to read 
and write GCR (group-coded recording) and MFM 
(modified frequency modulation) data formats. 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Basics / 1 .7 



Apple FDHD/ 
SuperDrive 



The Apple FDHD/SuperDrive is a high-density (1.4 MB), 
3.5-inch disk drive. In addition to high-capacity data 
storage, the Apple FDHD/SuperDrive provides data 
exchangeability between Apple (GCR data format) and 
MS-DOS (MFM data format) systems. The Apple 
FDHD/SuperDrive is also fully backward-compatible 
with the current 800K disk format. 



i 



Identification 



The Apple FDHD/SuperDrive is the only internal drive 
supported by the Macintosh Ilsi. If you suspect that an 
800K drive has been installed internally, you can tell 
by removing the top lid and locating the microswitches 
(Figure 1-5) at the front of the drive. The Apple 
FDHD/SuperDrive has three microswitches; the 800K 
drive has only two microswitches. 



1.4 MB 




Microswitches 



Figure 1-5 Floppy Drive Identification 

You can also identify an Apple FDHD/SuperDrive by 
removing it from the Macintosh Ilsi and checking the 
manufacturer's label (Figure 1-6) on the bottom of the 
drive: all high-density drives have the note 2MB on 
the label. 






1 .8 / Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Ilsi 




Figure 1-6 FDHD/SuperDrive Label 



High-Density 



The Apple FDHD/SuperDrive can read, write, and 
format 800K media data disks. However, special high- 
density, 3.5-inch disks that take full advantage of the 
increased capacity of the Apple FDHD/SuperDrive are 
also available. 



CAUTION: High-density media are more likely to have 
problems than low-density media. To avoid media- 
related problems, use only known-good media or high- 
density media bearing the Apple label. 

As shown in the drive-and-media compatibility matrix 
(Figure 1-7), 800K drives can read, write, and format 
single- and double-sided media. However, Apple does 
not recommend using high-density media in 800K disk 
drives. Data saved to high-density media using 800K 
drives is unreliable and could be lost later. The Apple 
FDHD/SuperDrive can read, write, and format single- 
sided, double-sided, and high-density media. In 
addition, Apple FDHD/SuperDrives can read, write, and 
format 720K and 1.4 MB double-sided MFM-format 
media. 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Basics / 1 .9 






DRIVE 


MEDIA 


MEDIA FORMAT 


400K 
(GCR) 


800K 
(GCR) 


720K 
(MFM) 


1.4 MB 
(MFM) 


800K 
800K 
800K 


Single-Sided 

Double-Sided 

High-Density 


R/W/F 

R/W/F 

NR 


NR 

R/W/F 

NR 


X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 


FDHD 
FDHD 
FDHD 


Single-Sided 

Double-Sided 

High-Density 


R/W/F 

R/W/F 

X 


NR 

R/W/F 

X 


X 

R/W/F 
X 


X 
X 

R/W/F 



NR = Not Recommended 

R = Read 

W = Write 

F = Format 

X = Not Allowed 



Figure 1-7 Drive/Media Compatibility Matrix 



Afofe; To help understand drive and media format 
compatibility, think in terms of the drive/media of 
lowest capacity. For example, if your system has both 
an external 800K drive and an Apple FDHD/SuperDrive, 
to ensure media format compatibility between the two 
drives you must use 800K media (the drive and media of 
lowest capacity). 



1.10 /Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh 1 1 si 



□ SPECIFICATIONS 



Processor 



MC68030 processor: 32-bit architecture with 256K data 
and instructional caches supporting burst reads 



Clock Frequency 
Addressing 



20 MHz 



32-bit internal registers 

32-bit address bus 

Supports paged memory management 



Coprocessor 



20 MHz MC68882 floating-point unit (FPU) included on 
the optional adapter card 



Memory 



512K on a ROM SIMM 

2 MB RAM, expandable to 17 MB 

256 bytes of parameter memory 



Slot Expansion 



One slot for either a NuBus or an 030 Direct Slot card 

Power available (15 watts maximum) 

+5 V 2.000 Amp 

+12 V .175 Amp 

-12 V .150 Amp 



Sound 



Apple Sound Chip (ASC), including: 

• Four-voice wave table synthesis 

• Stereo sampling generator capable of driving stereo 
mini phone jack headphones or stereo equipment 

• Sound input capability 



Disk Drives 



Internal SCSI hard disk 

Internal Apple 1.4 MB, FDHD/SuperDrive 

Up to six external SCSI drives 

One external floppy drive (800K drive or 

FDHD/SuperDrive; does not support 400K drive) 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Basics/ 1.11 



SCSI 
Serial Ports 



One external SCSI port (DB-25) 
Two RS-422/RS-232/AppleTalk® serial ports 
(mini DIN-8) 



Video Display 



Built-in video support with external video port to 

support Macintosh 12-Inch RGB Display, Apple High- 
Resolution Monochrome Monitor, AppleColor™ 
High-Resolution RGB Monitor, Macintosh Portrait 
Display, and Macintosh 12-Inch Monochrome Display 



Keyboard 



Apple Keyboard, Apple Keyboard II, or Apple Extended 
Keyboard connected through Apple Desktop Bus 
ports (Mini DIN-4) 



Mouse 



Apple Desktop Bus mouse (Mini DIN-4) 



Input Power 



100 to 240 volts AC RMS automatically configured 
50-60 Hz single phase 

130 watts maximum, not including monitor convenience 
power connector load 



System 
Output Power 



Output receptacle: 100-240 volts AC, RMS (determined 

by actual input voltage) 
DC power: 47 watts maximum 



Clock/Calendar 



CMOS custom chip with long-life lithium battery 



Operating Temperature 



10° C to 40° C 
50° F to 104 Q F 



Storage Temperature 



-40° C to 47° C 
-40° F to 116.6° F 



Relative Humidity 



5% to 95% (noncondensing) 



Altitude 



to 3048 m (0 to 10,000 ft) 



1.12/ Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 






□ THEORY OF OPERATION 



Introduction 



The Macintosh Ilsi computer is made up of three basic 
modules: the logic board, the power supply, and the 
disk drives. The computer can have one internal floppy 
disk drive, one internal SCSI hard disk drive, up to six 
external SCSI devices (drives, scanners, etc.), and one 
external floppy disk drive. 

The information here will give you an understanding of 
how the Macintosh Ilsi works. This understanding, in 
turn, will assist you in performing logical 
troubleshooting on this system. 

Figure 1-8 shows a block diagram of the Macintosh Ilsi. 



System 
Startup 



When the computer is turned on, the system begins a 
carefully synchronized sequence of events. The 
software determines the memory size and compiles a 
table describing the current memory configuration. The 
memory management unit (MMU) is then programmed, 
based on this table, to provide contiguous logical 
memory from the potentially noncontiguous physical 
segments in banks A and B. The 24/32-bit memory map 
allows existing Macintosh software to use a 24-bit 
address mode; new software can use the full 32-bit 
address space. The mapping is implemented simply and 
directly. 

At this point the disk startup process begins. The 
system looks for a readable disk in the available disk 
drives in the following order: 



1. Internal floppy disk drive 

2. External floppy disk drive 

3. Setup device set in the control panel 

4. SCSI devices in declining order of device ID (from 
6 to 0) 

Note: If the battery is removed or the contents of the 
parameter RAM are destroyed, the setup device defaults 
to the device with ID=0. 

The system finds a readable disk, reads the disk, and 
completes the disk startup process. 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Oct 90 



Basics/ 1.13 



(AO-31) 



CPU 

Motorola 
MC68030 

20 MHz 



CPU Int's 



(IPL0-2) 
Address Bus , 



(A0-31) 
Data Bus 



(D0-31) 



o 

ts 

© 
c 
c 
o 
O 

_o 

CO 

ts 



o 

§ 



3 
CL 
O 



(AO-31) 



(DO-31) 



Power and 
Clock 



(RAB0-11) 



MDU 
Custom 
Memory 
Decode 

Unit 



BankB 
(4 SIMMs) 



T 



Physical 
Address Map 



i 



Device Selects 



(RAA0-11) 



F0O0 0000 
6000 0000 



5000 0000 



4000 0000 



3000 0000 
0000 0000 



NuBus Slots 

I/O Devices 
ROM 
RAM& 
Video 



RAM 

Read-Write 

Memory 

0-64 MB 



RAM 

Read-Write 

Memory 

1 MB 



Bank A 
8-256Kx4 

DRAMs 

Soldered 

in 



(DO-31) 



(AO.1.4) 



(AO-22) 



(A2-4) 



(A0-11) 



(A9-12) 



(A4-6) 



(A9-12) 



(D24-31) 



F245 

Bus 

Buffers 



(RDO-31) 



(DO-31) 



ROM 

Read-Only 

Memory 

.5-32 MB 



(D24-31) 



VDAC 
478D/A& 

Color 
Lookup 



(D24-31) 



(D24-31) 



ASC 
Custom 
Sound 

Chip 



(D24-31) 



VIA1 
Versatile 
Interface 
Adapter 



(D24-31) 



COMBO 
85C80 
Small 

Computer 
System 
Interface 

and Serial 

Communi- 
cations 

Controller 



(D24-31) 



SWIM 
Custom 

"BE" 

Controller 



(1SIMM& 
One Set On 
Motherboard) 



NMI 



RBV 

Custom 

RAM-Based 

Video IC 



(Registers & 
Interrupts! 



I/O And ' 

NuBus 

Interrupts 



Sync Signals 



Video 



(0-8) 
Bits) 



Video (0-8 Bits) 



Sync Signals 



R,G, & B 



Left Channel 



Right Channel 



FIFO 

andCtl 

Logic 



Sony 
Custom Amp 



Sony 
Custom Amp 



Internal 
Speaker 



Video 
Port 



w 



Sound-out 
Port 



A/D 
Converter ■ 



Sound 
Input Port 



ADB 

Custom 

68HC05 

Microcontroller 



Apple 
Desktop 
Bus Port 



Port for Internal 
Hard Disk 



External 
SCSI Port 

— fljfc.y.y.y.y.y.yffi 



Channel A 



Channel B 



Drivers 

and 

Receivers 



Port A (Modem) 



Serial 
Ports 



Port B (Printer) 



Port For Internal 
Floppy Disk 

KzakiinlaJ 



External 

Floppy Disk 

Port 



Figure 1-8 Block Diagram 






1.14/ Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 






Logic Board 



The logic board is the heart of the system, the place 
where all processing of information takes place. Below 
is a list of the major components of the Macintosh Ilsi 
logic board and the functions they perform. 

By using the block diagram in Figure 1-8 as you read 
through the various sections, you will get a clearer 
understanding of how the logic board works. 



Microprocessors 



The Macintosh Ilsi contains a 68030 microprocessor, 
which is a true 32-bit processor but also supports 24- 
and 1 6-bit processing modes. The microprocessor runs 
at 20 MHz for high performance. When running in the 
24-bit addressing mode, the Macintosh Ilsi is compatible 
with the majority of existing Macintosh applications. 

When working in A/UX (Apple UNIX®), the 68030 
microprocessor incorporates instruction sets for 
handling paged memory management, thereby 
eliminating the need for an HMMU or PMMU (as found 
in the Macintosh II). When the 68030 seeks data from a 
memory location that isn't in the RAM, the 68030 swaps 
the page containing the data from the disk to the RAM. 



RAM 



The random-access memory (RAM) interface on the logic 
board is designed to support from 1 MB to 65 MB of 
RAM. The interface supports burst mode, which allows 
a five-clock initial access followed by 3 two-clock 
accesses. The first MB of RAM is found in eight 256K 
x 4 fast-page-mode DRAMs that are soldered onto the 
logic board. This RAM is called bank A. Bank A RAM 
cannot be changed by technicians, but the logic board 
can be manufactured with 4-Mbit parts to provide a 4 
MB base memory configuration. 

Four single in-line memory module (SIMM) sockets are 
provided for memory expansion. This expansion RAM 
is called bank B. Bank B can be empty or it can contain 
four same-sized SIMMs. Table 1 shows the various 
possible RAM configurations. 

RAM banks A and B do not occupy contiguous address 
space, as they do on most previous Macintosh products. 
The 68030 on-chip MMU is used to join the 
noncontiguous blocks of physical memory to current 
contiguous logical memory for application software. 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Oct 90 



Basics/ 1.15 



BankB 




RAM 


Empty 




1 MB 


Four 256K 


SIMMs 


2 MB 


Four 512K 


SIMMS 


3 MB 


Four 1 MB 


SIMMs 


5 MB 


Four 2 MB 


SIMMs 


9 MB 


Four 4 MB 


SIMMs 


17 MB 



Bank A 

1 MB on-board DRAM 
1 MB on-board DRAM 
1 MB on-board DRAM 
1 MB on-board DRAM 
1 MB on-board DRAM 
1 MB on-board DRAM 



Table 1 RAM Configurations 

On-board video operates out of bank A, which is used 
as the frame buffer. The RAM-based video (RBV) frame 
buffer varies in size, depending on the currently 
selected bit depth and on the size of the video monitor 
plugged into the on-board video port. The RBV 
requires only enough memory to hold the contents of 
the screen; it does not require any additional memory 
for the frame buffer. Software determines the maximum 
video bit depth available at startup and sets aside the 
needed memory. 

Every time the Macintosh Ilsi is switched on, the 
system software performs a memory test to determine 
how much RAM is present and whether the RAM is 
good. 

Video accesses affect only bank A memory access 
because the data bus between the RAM banks can be 
disconnected by a bus buffer (Figure 1-9). This access 
allows the RBV to fetch data from bank A without 
interrupting CPU access to bank B or I/O devices. Each 
bank of RAM is accessed independently by the memory 
decode unit (MDU), so the MDU can decode addresses 
for the CPU and the RBV at the same time without 
interference. 



ROM The ROMs are the system's nonvolatile read-only 

memory. The earliest Macintosh Ilsi computers contain 
a ROM SIMM; later units contain two 4-Mbit ROM 
chips soldered on the logic board. These chips are 
256K x 16 devices in a 44-pin quad flat pack. 



. 






1.16/ Basics Oct 90 Macintosh Ilsi 



The 64-pin ROM SIMM socket will allow the Macintosh 
Ilsi to use new ROM SIMMs when they are available, 
thus providing a simple method to upgrade the machine. 



CPU 

Motorola 
MC68030 



Address 
Bus 



(AO-31) 



(DO-31) 



(AO-31) 




MDU 



RAM 
Address 



RAM 
BankB 



Data Bus (DO-31) 






?s s \)r 



RAM 
Bank A 



ALS245 

Bus 

Buffer 






(RDO-31) 



RBV 



Figure 1-9 RAM/Video Diagram 



Built-in Video 
RBV Chip 



The RBV (RAM-based video) consists of two functional 
parts, the video interface and the VI A2. The video 
portion of the RBV and bank A of RAM share a 
separated RAM data bus, which can be connected to or 
disconnected from the CPU data bus by bus buffers. The 
RBV uses data stored in bank A of RAM to feed a 
constant stream of video data to the display monitor 
during the live video portion of each horizontal screen 
line. The RBV asks the MDU (memory decode unit) for 
data as needed. The MDU responds by disconnecting 
the bank A RAM data bus from the CPU data bus and 
performing a DMA burst read from bank A RAM while 
clocking the read data into the RBV. 



If a video burst is in progress, CPU access to RAM bank 
A is delayed, effectively slowing the CPU. This effect 
is more pronounced for the larger monitors and for 
video configurations using more bits per pixel. Only 
access to RAM bank A is affected by video. The 
optional bank B of RAM connects directly to the CPU 
data bus, and the CPU has full access to this bank at all 
times, as it does to ROM and the I/O devices. 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Oct 90 



Basics/ 1.17 



The video signals generated by the RBV chip are driven 
through a CLUT/VDAC (color lookup table/video 
digital-to-analog converter) chip. The lookup table has 
256 three-byte entries (one byte each for red, green, 
and blue), and triple 8-bit video D/A converters. 

When a monitor is connected to the built-in video ports, 
the monitor will ground certain pins on the connector. 
The grounding pattern allows the RBV to identify the 
type of monitor connected. The RBV automatically 
selects the appropriate pixel clock and sync timing 
parameters. If an unknown monitor is plugged in or no 
monitor is plugged in, built-in video output is halted. 
The MON. ID bits can specify eight possible 
combinations, as shown in Table 2. 



i 



MON. ID 
3 2 1 



1 

10 

1 1 
10 
10 1 

1 1 

111 



Monitor 
Selected 


Screen 
Size 


Bit Depths 
Supported 


Refresh 
Rate 


Unsupported monitor 








15" Portrait Display (B/W) 


640 x 870 


1, 2, 4 


75 Hz 


Mac 12-Inch RGB Display 


512 x 384 


1, 2, 4, 8 


60.15 Hz 


Unsupported monitor 








Unsupported monitor 








Unsupported monitor 









Mac 12" B/W, 13" RGB, 
and Apple High Res B/W 



640 x 480 



1, 2, 4, 8 



66.67 Hz 



No external monitor 

Table 2 RAM-Based Video Monitors Supported 

The VIA2 portion contains eight 8-bit registers for 
miscellaneous inputs and outputs, video control, RBV 
chip-testing modes, and interrupt handling. The CPU 
communicates with these registers over an 8-bit 
bidirectional data bus that is separate from the 32-bit 
RAM data bus used by the video portion. 






1.18 /Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 



Input /Output 
Interface 



The input/output interfaces of the system are the 
serial ports, the floppy disk, the SCSI port, the ADB 
port, and the sound subsystem. The optional numeric 
coprocessor, the VIA chip, the VTA2 (which is part of the 
RBV chip), and associated circuitry are, to some extent, 
considered input/output devices; however, one should 
recognize that these components provide input/output to 
the processor. They do not have external ports as the 
system-level input/output circuitry does. Each of these 
interfaces is designed to be backwards compatible, when 
possible, with existing Macintosh systems. 



Serial 

Communications 

Controller 



The serial communications controller (SCO is an 8-MHz 
AMD 85C30. This device, also known as the combo 
chip, combines the functions of the SCC and the SCSI 
controller into a single device. The 85C80 is designed 
to be transparent to operating software. The SCC 
portion of the 85C80 has two independent ports for 
serial communication. Each port can be independently 
programmed for asynchronous, synchronous, and 
AppleTalk protocols. The serial ports conform to EI A 
standard RS-422. These ports are used mainly for 
(though not limited to) connecting the Macintosh Ilsi to 
networks, printers, and modems. 

To use the serial ports with RS-232 single-ended 
devices, use the RS-422 TxD- for the RS-232 TxD, RS- 
422 RxD- for the RS-232 RxD, and ground RxD+ to the 
SG pin (Figure 1-10). 




HSKo 



Figure 1-10 Mini DIN-8 Connector 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Oct 90 



Basics/ 1.19 



Small Computer 
System Interface 



The second portion of the 85C80 is the small computer 
system interface (SCSI) controller. The SCSI portion of 
the 85C80 supports the SCSI as defined by the American 
National Standards Institute (ANSI) X3T9.2 Committee. 
This part of the device is compatible with the 53C80 
controller used in the Macintosh II family. The rest of 
the SCSI interface consists of an internal 50-pin 
connector and an external DB-25 connector. 



The chip is connected directly to the internal 50-pin 
connector and the external DB-25 connector, and it 
controls the high-speed parallel port for communicating 
with up to seven SCSI peripherals. (If you have an 
internal SCSI drive, you can have only six external 
SCSI peripherals.) This device supports arbitration of 
the SCSI bus, including reselection. The chip is 
controlled through a set of memory-mapped read-and- 
write registers. 

The 85C80 does not provide the internal SCSI disk 
drive with termination power; the drive provides the 
termination power. 



SWIM Chip 



The Sanders-Woz Integrated Machine (SWIM) interface 
is the single chip that controls the internal 3.5-inch 
floppy disk drive and the optional external 3.5-inch 
drive. The SWIM incorporates the functionality of the 
integrated Woz machine (IWM) and provides the 
capability to read, write, and format in both GCR 
(Apple) and MFM (MS-DOS and Apple high-density) data 
formats. The SWIM chip controls the one internal 
floppy disk drive and the one external floppy drive. 



Sound Subsystem 



Sound Output 



The sound subsystem offers new levels of functionality 
not offered as standard features on previous Macintosh 
computers. The sound input portion consists of discrete 
logic and memory components. 

The sound output circuit consists of the Apple Sound 
Chip (ASC) and two Sony sound chips that filter the 
pulse-width-modulated (PWM) signal and drive the 
internal speaker or external stereo miniphone jack. 
The speaker drive circuit utilizes a separate amplifier 
that mixes the right and left channels to drive the 
internal speaker. 



1.20 /Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 



Sound Input The sound input portion consists of an input jack; a 

preamplifier; a switched capacitor filter to provide 
input filtering; an analog-to-digital converter; a first-in, 
first-out (FIFO) memory to store the digitized data; and 
control logic that allows software to control the 
circuitry. Sound control registers are used by software 
to control the storage of data and the generation of 
interrupts. The sound input control register controls 
the sample rate, the record/play bit, and write/ 
diagnostic address to the FIFO. Sound samples can be 
made at 11 or 22 KHz with 8-bit resolution. 

Sound input sources can be either a microphone or an 
audio line, either of which can be plugged into the 
sound input jack on the rear of the computer. The 
sound subsystem accommodates stereo output and 
monaural input. If a stereo signal is fed into the sound 
input section, the two sides will be summed (or mixed) 
before being digitized. 

Input devices can be connected to the microphone input 
connector on the rear of the computer. The input 
source should provide a 20-mV amplitude and a 600 £2 
input impedance. A line input source — such as a CD 
player, VCR, or tape player — provides a higher input 
level. Apple provides an attenuating adapter plug to 
decrease the level of these devices so that they are 
compatible with the Macintosh Ilsi input. Apple also 
provides an electret microphone for users to digitize 
voice inputs. 

Electret microphones require a bias voltage. Most 
external electret microphones provide a battery within 
the microphone body to power the element. The Apple 
electret is powered by the computer system with a bias 
voltage provided at the second tip of the input 
connector. This connection provides eight volts DC at 
up to 1 mA. This voltage has no effect on input devices 
that have a monophonic or stereo input plug. 

CAUTION: If the user inadvertently plugs some types of 
amplifiers into the sound input jack instead of the sound 
output jack, the DC voltage goes to the amplifier inputs. 
Damage to the amplifier could result Care must be taken 
to ensure that the connections to the rear of the computer 
are made correctly. 



Macintosh Ilsi Oct 90 Basics / 1 .21 



Apple 
Desktop Bus 



The Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) interface in the 
Macintosh Ilsi is implemented differently from the ADB 
on previous Macintosh computers. An 8-bit custom 
microcontroller is the heart of the design. This 
microcontroller is a custom Motorola 68HC05 that 
drives the external ADB bus and reads the status of the 
selected device. The system interfaces with this new 
custom device with an improved, extended handshake 
protocol with the VIA chip. 

The ADB controller also includes other functions that 
used to be provided by extra devices on the logic 
board. The controller includes a real-time clock and 
parameter RAM, along with control bits for the soft 
power control circuit, power-on reset, and keyboard- 
controlled reset and NMI functions. Each of these 
functions is described below. 

The ADB is a serial communication bus used to connect 
keyboards, mouse devices, graphic tablets, and other 
input devices to the system. It is a single-master, 
multiple-slave serial bus using an asynchronous 
protocol. The processor normally samples the state of 
each of the devices by using the control lines and shift 
register in VIA1 to read or write bytes over an internal 
serial link to the ADB controller. This is a 4-bit 
microprocessor that actually drives the external bus and 
reads the status of the selected device. The mini-DIN 
4-pin ADB connectors (Figure 1-11) connect the devices 
to the Macintosh Ilsi. 



i 




Power 



Data 



Male Cable 

(plug) 



Female PCB mount 
(back of machine) 



Figure 1-11 ADB Connector 

All devices that are made for the Apple Desktop Bus 
have some kind of microprocessor that makes them 
intelligent devices. All ADB devices, except the mouse, 
have ports for connecting to other ADB devices. 
Because it has no port, the mouse must be the last 
device attached to the Apple Desktop Bus. 



1.22 /Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Ilsi 



There are three Macintosh Apple ADB keyboards — the 
Apple Keyboard, Apple Keyboard II, and Apple 
Extended Keyboard. The keyboards connect to the 
Apple Desktop Bus port on the rear of the Macintosh 
Ilsi. The keyboards have their own microprocessors, 
which are called keyboard microcontrollers. The 
keyboards operate asynchronously, issue commands on 
the ADB, and transmit and receive data to and from the 
ADB devices. 



Real-Time 
Clock 



The Macintosh Ilsi real-time clock is a custom 
chip. It contains 256 bytes of RAM that are powered by 
a battery when external power is off. These RAM bytes 
are called parameter RAM (PRAM). Parameter RAM 
stores the configuration of ports, the clock setting, and 
other data that must be preserved even when system 
power is not available. 



Access to PRAM information is accomplished using a 
new pseudo device command protocol for use with the 
68HC05. This protocol is different from the protocols 
of previous Macintosh computers. Software can use the 
driver routines to access the clock and PRAM; however, 
software that attempts to access these hardware devices 
directly must be modified. 



Power 
Control 



The Macintosh Ilsi has a soft-off/hard-on circuit to 
control the power supply. The circuit is designed to 
control the power supply through the power fail 
warning (PFW) signal to the power supply and the 
expansion slot interface. 

When either the keyboard on/off switch or the rear- 
panel power switch is pressed, the PFW signal is 
pulled high and the power supply turns the power on 
within 1.5 seconds. 

The rear-panel power switch can be locked in an ON 
position, which allows the unit to restart itself as soon 
as AC power is detected. In effect, when this switch is 
locked in the ON position and a power failure causes 
the unit to shut off, the unit will start up as soon as the 
power is reinstated. Also, when the switch is locked in 
the ON position, using the Shut Down command in the 
Finder™ causes the unit to restart. This feature is most 
valuable when using the unit as a file server. 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Oct 90 



Basics / 1 .23 



The Macintosh Ilsi provides two new power-up 
capabilities: 

• A programmable file server flag in PRAM provides 
the same functionality as the lockable power switch. 

• The PRAM can be programmed to turn the system on 
at a specified time. 

The power-off function is under software control when 
the Shut Down command in the Finder is used. This 
soft-off allows the computer to clean up any pending 
activity before switching off. In contrast, the power 
on/off switch generates a hard off that turns off the 
computer after 2 ms without going through software. 

The Macintosh Ilsi also provides a keyboard-initiated 
nonmasked interrupt (NMI) and reset. To produce a 
NMI, press <Command> and the power button at the 
same time; to reset, press <Command>, <Control>, and 
the power button at the same time. 

The NMI is used by debugging software to stop an 
application and change to a debugger for low-level 
software and hardware testing. The NMI signal has an 
enable flag in the PRAM of the 68HC05. When the 
68HC05 is initially powered up, the flag is reset and 
the NMI cannot be generated by the keyboard. 
Software that wishes to use this function needs to set 
the enable flag in the PRAM so that the keyboard NMI 
can be generated. 

The reset is a hard reset, identical to the power-on 
reset. All RAM contents are lost and the computer 
behaves as if it were just switched on. 



Power The power supply operates on standard line voltage and 

Supply outputs +5 V, +12 V, and -12 V DC voltages, which are 

used by the logic board, the internal devices, and the 

slots. 

CAUTION: It is extremely important that the ratings of the 
power supply not be exceeded Exceeding the ratings 
will result in damage to the power supply and the logic 
board. See the specifications in this section for maximum 
ratings for the system. 



i 



1 .24 / Basics Oct 90 Macintosh Ilsi 






Fuses 



The logic board has three fuses that protect the 
external connectors, SCSI, floppy disk drive, and ADB. 
These fuses are resettable polyfuses and require about 
four seconds to reset once blown by an overload. 



Internal Floppy 
Disk Drives 



The internal disk drive connects to the main logic board 
through an internal connector. The flow of data 
between the logic board and the disk drives is 
channeled through the SWIM disk controller. The 
SWIM controls reading and writing operations. 



FDHD 
Drive 



The SWIM disk controller enables the Apple 
FDHD/SuperDrive to exchange data between Apple and 
MS-DOS® systems. The SWIM chip interprets, 
converts, and outputs dual-disk (clock/time) and file 
(data) signals as appropriate for either GCR (Apple) or 
MFM (MS-DOS and Apple high-density) formats. This 
arrangement provides the capability to read, write, and 
format Apple 800K data disks (GCR), MS-DOS 720K data 
disks (MFM), and Apple or MS-DOS high-density (1.4 
MB) data disks (MFM). For specific compatibilities 
between drives and media, see Figure 1-7. 

An application-specific translator within the Apple File 
Exchange utility program, or provided by third parties, 
must be used to translate the formatted data for use 
within an application program. 



Internal Hard 
Disk SCSI 



The hard disk connects to the logic board through the 
internal SCSI connector. Other SCSI devices may be 
daisy-chained to the external SCSI port. 



Expansion Slot 



The Macintosh Ilsi has one expansion slot that can 
accept a NuBus card or an 030 Direct Slot card. 

The expansion bus connector is a 120-pin DIN-style 
three-row connector. The connector provides the 32-bit 
CPU data and address buses, DMA control signals, other 
CPU control signals, interrupt inputs, and status signals 
for future expansion. Additionally, +5 V, +12 V, and 
-12 V power is provided. An adapter card allows the 
expansion card to be installed horizontally, parallel to 
the main logic board. There is sufficient clearance 
provided by the adapter card for cooling air to flow 
between the boards. 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Oct 90 



Basics / 1 .25 



The installation process for a NuBus card is quite 
different from the installation process for an 030 Direct 
Slot card. When installing either card, be sure to 
follow the directions that come with the adapter card. 



i 



Numeric Coprocessor 



The numeric coprocessor is located on the optional 
adapter cards. The numeric coprocessor is an MC68882 
device that provides a high degree of precision and 
speed for numeric computations. 

Note: Some software applications require that the 
numeric coprocessor be on the logic board. Such 
applications require special adaptations to run on the 
Macintosh Ilsi. 



NuBus Card 



The NuBus interface is based on the Apple NuBus 
specification. This interface adds the NMRQ- to the 
IEEE NuBus definition of NuBus slots. The NMRQ- 
line from the slot is wired to a pin of the RBV to allow 
the immediate determination of interrupt source rather 
than a polling of all possible interrupt sources. 



Note: To guarantee that the Macintosh Ilsi meets all 
specifications regardless of the operation conditions, 
the power dissipation should not exceed 15 watts. 

The NuBus interface supports the following features for 
the Macintosh Ilsi: 

• Geographic Addressing Each of the three slots has a 
unique 4-bit value encoded into the slots, which 
eliminates the need for DIP switches or other means 
to uniquely address each card. 

• Distributed Arbitration There is no central bus 
master or daisy chain to assign bus mastership. The 
bus mastership is performed with the geographic 
addresses, thus allowing a priority within a group 
of bus requesters but not an overriding control of 
the bus. In theory, all requestors receive equal 
access to the bus over time. 

• Synchronous Transaction All bus transactions are 
timed relative to a single asymmetric 10-MHz clock. 

• 32-bit Address/Data The NuBus supports 4 GB of 
address with justified 8-bit, 1 6-bit, and 32-bit data 
transactions. The 68030 supports all these data 
types through the use of dynamic bus sizing. 
Dynamic bus sizing means word and long-word 



1 .26 / Basics 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Ilsi 



operations do not have to be aligned but instead 
cause multiple NuBus transactions to perform the 
proper alignment. The data bus from the 68030 to 
NuBus is byte reversed to allow sequential byte 
addresses to appear on the NuBus data ports in the 
same order as the NuBus address implies. 

• Bus Time-out The absence of a card on the NuBus 
will not hang the bus by waiting for a reply. A 
system resource errors-out any transaction taking 
longer than 25.6 [is. 

• Simple Interrupts Each card has the ability to 
generate simple open-collector interrupts that allow 
inexpensive cards to gain system attention without 
having to become bus master. 

The NuBus has three major states of communication 
with the Macintosh Ilsi system: 

• Processor-to-NuBus, which is activated whenever 
the microprocessor generates a physical slot 
address. If a device responds, the data is 
transferred. 






NuBus-to-Processor Bus, which is for access to RAM 
and ROM and for I/O to and from NuBus. Two 
control functions are performed for this process. 
One tracks the changes on NuBus, and the other lets 
the 68030 tell NuBus what to do next. 



NuBus time-out, which is required to prevent access 
to empty slots. Such access would hang the system. 



Direct Slot Card 



The internal expansion connector can be used as an 030 
Direct Slot. This enables Apple and third-party 
expansion cards to directly access the 32-bit address 
and data bus of the 68030 microprocessor. This slot 
architecture delivers the improved performance of the 
32-bit bus and has other benefits for expansion card 
developers. However, the greater pin demands of the 
32-bit bus require using a 120-pin connector. As a 
result, most accelerator and video expansion cards 
designed to utilize a 1 6-bit data bus cannot be used. 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Oct 90 



Basics / 1 .27 






# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llsi 

Section 2 - Take-Apart 



□ CONTENTS 








2.2 


Electrostatic Discharge Prevention 




2.3 


Top Cover 




2.5 


Adapter Card and 030 Direct Slot Card 




2.7 


Adapter Card, Bracket, and NuBus Card 




2.8 


Fan 




2.9 


Power Supply 




2.10 


Hard Disk Drive 




2.13 


Floppy Disk Drive 




2.14 


Main Logic Board 




2.17 


Speaker 



Note: If a step is underlined, detailed instructions for 
that step can be found elsewhere in the section. 



Macintosh llsi Oct 90 Take- Apart / 2.1 



□ ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE PREVENTION 



The Macintosh Ilsi contains ROM and RAM memory 
(which is installed on small separate boards called 
SIMMs — single in-line memory modules) and CMOS 
components. The CMOS components and the SIMMs are 
very susceptible to damage from electrostatic discharge 
(ESD). 

Preventive measures must be taken to avoid ESD 
damage. When you unwrap, install, or replace modules, 
observe the appropriate ESD precautions. 

For complete ESD prevention information, refer to the 
You Oughta Know tab in the Apple Service Technical 
Procedures. 

If the proper ESD procedures are not available, then do 
the following: 

Turn off the power and disconnect the power cord. 
After removing the cover and before going near the 
logic board, touch the metal of the power supply case. 



2.2 / Take-Apart Oct 90 Macintosh Ilsi 



□ TOP COVER 
Remove 



1. Remove all cables that are attached to the rear of 
the computer. 

2. Push up on the tabs on the back of the cover 
(Figure 2-1) and lift up the lid. The cover may make 
a loud snap. 




Front 




Figure 2-1 Top Cover 



Replace 



1. Insert the front end of the cover onto the front end 
of the unit, making sure that the tabs on the cover 
fit into the receptacles on the unit. 

2. Swing the cover down toward the back of the unit, 
pressing down on the back until you hear the case 
click into place. 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Take- Apart / 2.3 



Hand 



Screws 



2A/T *e-Apan 



Adapter 
Card 



F igun 



030D '>ectS, , ( 




2?° Di^ 

SI °tCard 



' e »-Card 



e2 -2 The 



Ocf90 



Card 



toacinh 






osh iisj 






□ ADAPTER CARD AND 030 DIRECT SLOT CARD 



CAUTION: Adapter and expansion cards are sensitive to 
electrostatic discharge. To avoid damaging these cards, 
follow all ESD safety procedures. For complete ESD 
prevention information, refer to the You Oughta Know tab 
in the Apple Service Technical Procedures. 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 

2. Remove the screws that secure the 030 Direct Slot 
card to the access port. 

3. With a screwdriver, press down on the latch (Figure 
2-2) that secures the plastic bracket to the power 
supply. Remove the plastic bracket from the power 
supply carefully so that you do not flex the 030 
Direct Slot card. 

4. Carefully, and without flexing either card, pull the 
030 card out of the connector on the adapter card. 

5. If you are replacing the adapter card, remove the 
adapter card from the logic board by pulling straight 
up on the adapter card. 

Note: If you are replacing the 030 Direct Slot card, 
detach the plastic bracket and keep it to use with the 
replacement 030 Direct Slot card. 



Replace 



1. Attach the plastic bracket to the 030 Direct Slot 
card. The bracket snaps into place on the side of 
the Direct Slot card that is opposite the connector. 

2. Attach the 030 Direct Slot card to the adapter card. 

3. Attach the plastic bracket to the power supply. 

4. Press the adapter card into the expansion slot on 
the logic board. 

5. Secure the external connector of the 030 Direct Slot 
card to the access port. 

6. Repine thg tQp cover. 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.5 



NuBus Card 




Adapter Card 



Direct NuBus 
Connector 




Adapter Card 



2 -6 /Take-Apart 



Rgure 2-3 Adapter Carw D 

"»**. Bracket, and NuBus Card 



Oct 90 



Macintosh f/si 









□ ADAPTER CARD, BRACKET, AND NUBUS CARD 



CAUTION: Adapter and expansion cards are sensitive to 
electrostatic discharge. To avoid damaging these cards, 
follow all ESD safety procedures. For complete ESD 
prevention information, refer to the You Oughta Know tab 
in the Apple Service Technical Procedures. 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 

2. Loosen the two screws that fasten the NuBus card to 
the access port on the rear of the computer (Figure 
2-3). 

3. Pull straight up on the metal bracket to remove the 
bracket, NuBus card, and adapter card from the 
computer. 

4. If you are replacing the NuBus card, rest the 
adapter card on a flat surface, with the metal 
bracket and NuBus card perpendicular, and carefully 
pull the NuBus card out of the connector on the 
adapter card. 



Replace 



If the NuBus card is already attached to the adapter 
card and bracket, begin with step 2. 

1. Attach the NuBus card to the adapter card assembly. 

• Rest the adapter card on a flat surface, with the 
metal bracket perpendicular, and slide the NuBus 
card into the bracket, making sure that the pin on 
the bracket aligns with the slot on the NuBus 
card. 

• Press the NuBus card into the connector on the 
adapter card. 



2. Line up the connector on the adapter card with the 
expansion slot on the logic board. Press down 
gently but firmly on the adapter card until the 
connector is fully inserted. 

3. Replace the two screws that fasten the NuBus card 
to the access port on the rear of the computer. 

4. Replace the top cover . 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.7 



□ FAN 

Remove 



1. Remove the top cover and remove the 030 Direct 
Slot card , if one is installed. 

2. With the front of the computer facing you, place 
your thumbs under the fan (Figure 2-4) and pull 
straight up. The fan will snap free. (You may need 
to use moderate pressure to snap the fan free.) 



Replace 




Figure 2-4 Removing the Fan 



1. Align the fan so that the plastic notches of the fan 
assembly go into the plastic guides on the rear of 
the case. 

2. Push the fan all the way down until you hear the fan 
snap into place. The fan must rest securely against 
the logic board. 

3. Replace the 030 Direct Slot card (if one was 
installed) and the top cover . 



2.8 / Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 



□ POWER SUPPLY 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover , the 030 Direct Slot card (if 
one is installed), and the fan . 

2. Near the rear end of the power supply, locate the 
two metal tabs shown in Figure 2-5. Press in on the 
tabs and lift the rear end of the power supply about 
1/2 inch. 



On the front end of the power supply (near the 
floppy drive), locate the large plastic tab (Figure 
2-5) that latches the power supply to the bottom 
case. Using a finger, push the tab toward the front 
of the case and at the same time lift the power 
supply up and out of the case. 



Metal 
Tabs 



Power Supply 



Floppy Drive 




Plastic Release Tab 
(Metal-Colored) 



Figure 2-5 Power Supply 



Replace 



1. Position the power supply so that the white 
connector on the power supply fits into the white 
connector on the logic board. 

2. Slide the power supply into the case until the two 
metal tabs near the rear of the computer and the 
large plastic tab near the floppy drive hold the 
power supply in place. 



3. Replace the fan , the 030 Direct Slot card (if one was 
installed), and the top cover . 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart / 2.9 



□ HARD DISK DRIVE 



l 



Afofe: If you are replacing the hard disk drive, you will 
need a torque driver. Torque drivers are readily 
available at most hardware or automotive supply stores. 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 



2. Disconnect the power cable from connector J14 on 
the logic board (Figure 2-6). This connector has a 
locking tab that you must release in order to 
remove the cable. 

3. Disconnect the 50-pin connector from the logic 
board (Figure 2-6). You may have to gently rock the 
cable from side to side to release the cable. 

Note: If you are replacing the hard disk drive, 
detach the power cable and the 50-pin connector 
cable from the drive. You will need them to install 
the new drive. 



Release the two metal-colored tabs (Figure 2-6), 

on each side of the hard disk drive, and lift the 
drive (with its mounting carrier) out of the 
computer. 



one 



Hard 
Disk 
Drive 



Metal-Colored 
Release Tabs 



50-Pin 

Connector 

Cable 




Power 
Cable 



J14 

Power 

Connector 



Logic Board 



Figure 2-6 Hard Disk Drive 






2.10 /Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 



CAUTION: DO NOT loosen or remove any of the four torx 
screws that secure the black cover to the drive. 
Loosening or removing these screws can cause 
irreparable damage to the hard drive. 

5. If you are replacing the hard disk drive, remove the 
defective hard disk drive from its silver-colored 
mounting carrier by removing the four Phillips 
screws and lockwashers from the carrier. 



Replace 



If you are replacing a defective hard disk drive, begin 
with step 1. If you are simply reinstalling the same 
drive (which is already attached to the silver-colored 
mounting carrier), begin with step 3. 



1. Align the mounting carrier screw hole marked A on 
the replacement hard disk drive as shown in Figure 
2-7. Use the four lockwashers and Phillips screws 
to loosely fasten the carrier to the drive. 



SCSI 

Mounting 

Carrier 




Figure 2-7 Hard Disk Drive Carrier 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.11 



2. Using the torque driver and following the sequence 
shown in Figure 2-7, torque the four Phillips 
screws to 8.0 in-lbs. 

CAUTION: Be sure to use the Phillips screws that you 
removed in step 5 above and follow the installation 
sequence shown in Figure 2-7. Failure to do so can 
damage the drive. 

3. The hard drive goes over the speaker, with the 
carrier side down and the connectors facing the rear 
of the computer. Position the hard disk drive so 
that the metal tabs on the carrier align with the 
plastic release tabs on the bottom case (Figure 2-6). 

4. Push the carrier and drive down into the bottom 
case until the hard disk drive snaps into place. 

5. Connect one end of the 50-pin cable to the hard 
drive and the other end to connector J17 on the 
logic board. (Note that the cable has a small tab in 
the center of the connector at each end of the cable. 
Align this tab with the slot in the connectors on the 
logic board and on the hard disk drive.) 

6. Connect the rectangular end of the the power cable 
to the hard drive. 

7. Connect the square end of the power cable to 
connector J14 on the logic board. Be sure that the 
cable locks into place. 

8. Replace the top cover . 






2.12/ Take-Apart Oct 90 Macintosh llsi 



□ FLOPPY DISK DRIVE 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 



Disconnect the 20-pin connector (J18) from the logic 
board (Figure 2-8). You may have to gently rock the 
cable from side to side to free it from the connector. 

Release the two metal-colored tabs (Figure 2-8), and 
lift the drive straight up and out of the computer. 

Note: If you are replacing the floppy drive, detach 
the 20-pin cable from the bad drive. (Gently rock 
the cable from side to side to release the cable.) 
You will need the cable to connect the new drive. 



Floppy Disk Drive 



Metal-Colored Release Tabs 




J1 8 20-Pin Connector 



Figure 2-8 Floppy Disk Drive 



Replace 



1. Connect the 20-pin cable to the new drive. 

2. Position the drive so that the two plastic tabs of the 
case align with the metal tabs of the drive. Push 
the drive down until the tabs of the case snap into 
position over the tabs of the drive. 

3. Connect the 20-pin floppy cable to connector J18 on 
the logic board. 

4. Replace the top cover . 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.13 



□ MAIN LOGIC BOARD 



Remove 



i 



1. Remove the top cover , adapter card (if installed), 
fan , and power supply . 



2. Disconnect connector J18 (the floppy disk drive) and 
connectors J17 and J14 (the hard disk drive). 

3. Use your forefingers to release the two tabs (Figure 
2-9) that secure the logic board in place. 



Release 
Tab 



Logic Board 




On/Off Botton 



J20 
Underside 



Release 
Tab 



Figure 2-9 Main Logic Board 

4. Use your right thumb to push on the black 120-pin 
connector and slide the logic board toward the front 
of the case until the board stops. 

CAUTION: Be sure the power on/off button clears the rear 
panel before you lift the logic board out of the case. 



2.14 /Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 






5. Gently lift the board completely out of the case. 

CAUTION: Because the oil from your skin can be harmful 
to the connectors, do not touch the connector "fingers" of 
the speaker/LED (J20— located on the bottom side of the 
logic board) or connector J19. 



6. Use the SIMM removal tool (see the instructions in 
"SIMM Removal Tool" under the You Oughta Know 
tab) to remove the RAM SIMMs from the logic 
board. You will need to install these SIMMs on the 
new logic board. 

Note the size and number of the customer's RAM 
SIMMs. The customer must receive the same RAM 
SIMM configuration as was brought in. 



Replace 



1. Install the customer's RAM SIMMs onto the 
replacement logic board. 

2. Insert the logic board into the case so that the 
connectors align with the openings in the back 
panel. The slots in the logic board fit over the tabs 
on the bottom of the case. 

3. With a slight downward pressure, slide the logic 
board toward the rear of the case as far as it will 
go. The board will click into place. 

4. Reconnect connector J18 (the floppy disk drive) and 
connectors J17 and J14 (the hard disk drive). 

5. Replace the power supply , fan , adapter card (if you 
removed one), and top cover . 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.15 



I 



Speaker 




Wire 
Holder 



Figure 2-10 Speaker 



■ 



2.1 6 /Take-Apart 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 






□ SPEAKER 



Remove 



Remove the top cover , adapter card (if installed), 
fan , power supply , and hard disk drive . 

Disconnect the floppy disk drive cable from 
connector J18 on the logic board. 



3. Remove the logic board . 

4. Remove the diode power light on the front of the 
case by pushing the bulb back and pulling the diode 
(Figure 2-10) from the holder. Carefully remove the 
diode cables from the two cable holders. 

5. Release the four clips that hold the speaker to the 
bottom case (Figure 2-10). Lift the speaker out of 
the bottom case. 



Replace 



1. Place the speaker face-down in the bottom case. 
Push each of the four corners of the speaker firmly 
down until the four clips snap into position over the 
speaker. You may have to push back on the clips to 
snap them over the speaker edges. 

2. Replace the diode power light in its holder, and 
place the diode cables in the two cable holders 
(Figure 2-10). 

3. Replace the logic board , making sure that the metal 
connector fingers of the speaker contact the metal 
fingers on the underside of the logic board. 

4. Reconnect the floppy disk drive cable to connector 
J18 on the logic board. 

5. Replace the hard disk drive , power supply , fan . 
adapter card (if you removed one), and top cover . 



Macintosh llsi 



Oct 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.17 



4 Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llsi 

Section 3 - Diagnostics 



□ CONTENTS 



Refer to the MacTest MP section under the Macintosh 
Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh 
Family Apple Service Technical Procedures. 



Macintosh llsi rev. Jan 91 Diagnostics / 3.1 






fk Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llsi 

Section 4 - Troubleshooting 



□ CONTENTS 








4.2 


Introduction 




4.2 


General Information 




4.2 


Before You Start 




4.2 


Error Chords 




4.2 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




4.3 


How to Use the Troubleshooting Flowcharts 




4.4 


Things to Remember 




4.5 


Module Exchange Information 




4.5 


Logic Board Configuration 




4.5 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 




4.6 


Startup and Error Chords 




4.6 


Introduction 




4.6 


Startup Chord 




4.6 


Error Chords 




4.7 


Symptom Chart 




4.7 


Built-in Video Problems 




4.8 


Floppy Drive Problems 




4.8 


SCSI Problems 




4.9 


Peripheral Problems 




4.10 


Miscellaneous Problems 




4.12 


Macintosh llsi Flowcharts 




4.12 


Flowchart 1 Notes 




4.14 


Flowchart 2 Notes 




4.16 


Flowchart 3 Notes 




4.17 


Flowchart 4 Notes 




4.18 


Flowchart 5 Notes 




4.20 


RAM SIMM Verification 




4.20 


Introduction 




4.20 


Verification 




4.22 


Battery Verification 



Macintosh llsi 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.1 



□ INTRODUCTION 

General 
Information 



The following two disks may be used to test portions of 
the Macintosh Ilsi system: 

• MacTest MP 

• Macintosh Hard Disk Test (version 1.0 or higher) 

Use this troubleshooting section if you are unable to 
boot MacTest MP or if MacTest MP is unable to detect 
a module failure. After you repair the system, run 
MacTest MP to verify system operation. 

Note: See MacTest MP under the Macintosh Multiple- 
Product Diagnostic tab in the Macintosh Family 
Technical Procedures for instructions on using MacTest 
MP. See Macintosh Hard Disk Drive Diagnostic under 
the SCSI Hard Disk Drives tab of Cross Family 
Peripherals Technical Procedures for instructions on 
using Macintosh Hard Disk Test. 



Before 
You Start 



Read the subsections titled "Things to Remember," 
"Module Exchange Information," "Startup and Error 
Chords," "RAM SIMM Verification," and "Battery 
Verification" before you begin troubleshooting. You 
need the information provided in these subsections to 
troubleshoot the Macintosh Ilsi effectively. 



Error Chords 



How to Use 
the Symptom 
Chart 



When switched on, the Macintosh Ilsi executes a ROM- 
based self-test. If any part of the self-test fails, a 
sequence of chords will sound. To hear a sample of 
each sequence of chords, listen to the Diagnostic Sound 
Sampler on the MacTest MP disk. (Refer to Section 3, 
Diagnostics, for more information.) 

To use the symptom chart, first find the symptom that 
most nearly describes the problem; then perform the 
first corrective action on the solution list. If that 
corrective action does not fix the problem, go to the 
next action. If you replace a module and find that the 
problem remains, reinstall the original module before 
you go on to the next action. 

If the symptoms displayed by the Macintosh Ilsi are not 
listed in the symptom chart, or if the system is not 
displaying a clearly defined problem, use the flowchart 
subsection. 



4.2 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh Ilsi 






How to Use the 

Troubleshooting 

Flowcharts 



There are five numbered flowcharts for the 
Macintosh Ilsi. On completion of Flowchart 1, you 
will be instructed to continue to the next flowchart. 
Continue until you complete Flowchart 5. 

Each of the flowcharts includes references to notes that 
are above the flowchart or on the opposite page. These 
notes provide additional instructions or referrals to 
other procedures. 

Starting at the top of Flowchart 1, answer the questions 
and proceed down the chart. When you arrive at a 
rectangular box containing a list of actions, perform the 
actions in the sequence listed. On completion, return 
to the preceding diamond box. If the problem remains, 
reinstall the original module before you go on to the 
next action. 



Macintosh Ilsi 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.3 



□ THINGS TO REMEMBER 



ESD 



Follow all electrostatic discharge (ESD) 
precautions when working on the Macintosh Ilsi. 
Refer to the You Oughta Know tab in the Apple 
Service Technical Procedures for additional 
information. 



Troubleshooting 
Hints 



If available, use a known-good monitor and 
monitor cable. Using them will isolate the problem 
to the CPU, internal drive, keyboard, or mouse. 

Before you begin troubleshooting, remove the 
expansion and adaptor cards and disconnect any 
external devices (printers, SCSI devices, and/or 
ADB devices other than the keyboard and mouse). 

After the Macintosh Ilsi has passed the diagnostic 
tests, each expansion card or peripheral must be 
installed and tested. Install one device and test the 
system before adding other devices. Repeat the 
install-and-test process until all devices have been 
installed and tested. 



Normal 
Startup Tone 



4. Mark each known-good SIMM module on the 
exchange logic board with white correction fluid or 
a small sticker to prevent confusion during the 
troubleshooting procedure. 

5. Use a known-good copy of MacTest MP. 

6. During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
soft chord sounds. If you do not hear the chord, 
refer to "Startup and Error Chords" for additional 
information. 



System 
Configuration 



7. To ensure that customers get back the same system 
configurations that they bring in, record the 
following information: 

• The size of the SCSI hard disk (40 MB or 
80 MB) if one is installed 

• SIMM sizes 

• Type and serial number of expansion card 

• Whether a ROM SIMM is installed 



4.4 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh Ilsi 






System Software 



Verify that the customer is using System 6.0.7 or 
higher. Using earlier versions may destroy data or 
prevent the computer from booting. 



□ MODULE EXCHANGE INFORMATION 



Logic Board 
Configuration 



The Macintosh Ilsi logic board service exchange module 
is shipped without RAM SIMMs. To make sure that 
customers always get back the same logic board 
configurations that they brought in, be sure to record 
the amount of memory installed and the size of the RAM 
SIMMs. 



All Macintosh Ilsi logic boards are shipped with ROM 
memory. This memory may be on a ROM SIMM or it 
may be soldered onto the board at the locations marked 
ROM 4MBIT (near the floppy disk cable connector, J18). 
When you return a defective Macintosh Ilsi logic board, 
return it with the ROM, but without RAM SIMMs. 



Internal 
Hard Disk 
SCSI 



The internal 40 MB and 80 MB SCSI hard disk service 
modules are shipped without the SCSI cable connected. 
Be sure to keep the SCSI cable with the customer's 
Macintosh Ilsi system. The SCSI cable is sold as a 
separate replacement part and is not part of a module. 

The SCSI power cable is not included with the internal 
SCSI drive modules. You must detach the power cable 
from the old drive and install it on the replacement 
drive. 



Macintosh Ilsi 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.5 



□ STARTUP AND ERROR CHORDS 



Introduction 



When the Macintosh Ilsi is switched on, the ROM 
executes a self-test. If any part of the self-test fails, a 
sequence of chords will sound. 

If you are unable to interpret the chords, use the 
flowcharts and ignore the question about the startup 
chord on Flowchart 1. 



Startup Chord 



During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
chord is emitted; then a disk icon appears on the screen. 
The disk will have a flashing question mark (if a 
startup disk is not found) or a smiling face (if a startup 
disk is found). 



Error Chords 



If a startup chord and additional chords sound, a blank 
gray screen will usually be all one sees. Three 
sequences play whenever an error is encountered 
during startup: startup chord first; then the short, harsh 
error chord; followed closely by the test monitor 
sequence (four chords, from low to high). 



Initial Failure 



If you hear the above sequence, a failure has occurred 
during the initial hardware self-tests. To correct the 
problem: 

1. Exchange the RAM SIMMs. (Refer to "RAM SIMM 
Verification" in this section for complete 
instructions.) 

2. If RAM SIMM exchanges do not work, exchange the 
logic board. (Install the customer's RAM SIMMs on 
the exchange board.) 

3. If the system still does not work, you will need to 
perform the RAM SIMM verification with the 
exchange logic board. (Refer to "RAM SIMM 
Verification" in this section.) 



4.6 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh Ilsi 






□ SYMPTOM CHART 



Built-in Video Problems Solutions 



Screen is dark, audio 
and at least one drive 
operate, fan is running, 
and LED is lit 



1. Adjust brightness on monitor. 

2. Replace monitor. 

3. Replace video cable. 

4. Replace SIMMs (refer to "RAM SIMM Verification" 
in this section). 

5. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 

6. Replace power supply. 



• Screen dark, no audio, 1. Replace video cable. 



no drive, but fan is 
running and LED 
is lit 



2. Replace monitor. 

3. Remove any NuBus cards. 

4. Remove all external peripherals. 

5. Replace SIMMs (refer to "RAM SIMM Verification" 
in this section). 

6. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 

7. Replace power supply. 



Partial or whole 
screen is bright and 
audio is present, but 
no video information 
is visible 



1. Replace video cable. 

2. Replace monitor. 

3. Replace logic board. 



Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Screen is completely 
dark, fan is not 
running, and LED is 
not lit 



3. 
4. 

5. 



Plug the monitor directly into the wall socket, and 

verify that the monitor has power. 

NuBus card is drawing too much power. Remove the 

NuBus card and switch on power again. 

Remove all external peripherals. 

Replace power supply. 

Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Afofa: If replacing the monitor corrects the problem, 
refer to the appropriate Apple Service Technical 
Procedures to obtain replacement information. 



Macintosh llsi 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.7 



Floppy Drive Problems Solutions 



- 



• Audio and video 
present but 
internal floppy drive 
does not operate 



1. Replace internal floppy disk drive cable. 

2. Replace internal floppy disk drive. 

3. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Disk ejects; display 
shows Mac icon 
with blinking "X" 



1. Replace floppy disk with known-good disk. 

2. Replace internal disk drive cable. 

3. Replace internal disk drive. 

4. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Disk will not eject 



1. Switch off system and hold mouse button down 
while switching on. 

2. Try ejecting disk manually with paper clip. 

3. Replace disk drive. 



Drive attempts to 
eject disk, but 
doesn't 



1. Try pushing disk completely in. 

2. Try ejecting disk manually with paper clip. 

3. Replace disk drive. 



SCSI Problems 



Solutions 



• Internal disk drive 
runs continuously 



1. Replace internal SCSI drive cable. 

2. Replace internal hard drive. 

3. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Internal hard disk 
will not operate 



1. Replace SCSI cable. 

2. Replace SCSI power cable. 

3. Replace hard drive. 

4. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



4.8 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh llsi 






Peripheral Problems 



Solutions 



Works with internal or 
external SCSI device 
but will not work 
with both 



1. Verify that SCSI select-level switch on external 
device is set to a different priority from internal. 

2. Replace terminator on the external device. 

3. Verify that terminator is installed on the internal 
SCSI drive. 

4. Replace SCSI device select cable. 



• Cursor does not move 



1. Reboot system. 

2. Check mouse connection. 

3. If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect the 
mouse to the rear ADB port instead and disconnect 
the keyboard. If mouse works, replace keyboard. 

4. If mouse does not work in the ADB port, replace 
mouse. 

5. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 






Cursor moves, but 
clicking the mouse 
button has no effect 



Cannot double-click 
to open an application, 
disk, or server 



1. Replace mouse. 

2. Replace logic board. 



1. 

2. 



3. 



4. 



Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Remove extra system files on the hard disk. 

Clear parameter RAM. Hold down the <Shift> 

<Option> <Command> keys and select Control Panel 

from the Apple menu. Reset mouse controls. 

If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to 

the rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, replace 

keyboard. 

If mouse does not work in the ADB port, replace the 

mouse. 

Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



No response to any 
key on the keyboard 



1. Check keyboard connection to ADB port. 

2. Replace keyboard cable. 

3. Replace keyboard. 

4. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Macintosh llsi 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.9 



Known-good 


1. 


ImageWriter or 
ImageWriter II 
will not print 


2. 

3. 
4. 




5. 


Known-good 
LaserWriter 


1. 

2. 


will not print 





3. 



Make sure the System is version 6.0.7 (or higher). 

Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 

are set correctly. 

Check the printer DIP switches. 

Replace printer interface cable. 

Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Make sure the System is version 6.0.7 (or higher). 
Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 
are set correctly. 

Refer to the Networks tab in the Apple Service 
Technical Procedures for more information. 



Miscellaneous Problems Solutions 



Clicking, chirping, 
or thumping sound 



1. Replace power supply. 

2. Disconnect hard disk; replace if noise disappears. 

3. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



System shuts down 
intermittently 



2. 
3. 
4. 



Make sure air vents on the back and top of the main 

unit are clear. Thermal protection circuitry may 

shut down the system. After 30 to 40 minutes, the 

system should be OK. 

Replace power cable. 

Replace power supply. 

Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



System intermittently 
crashes or locks up 



1. Make sure the System is version 6.0.7 (or higher). 

2. Make sure software is known-good. 

3. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 

4. Replace SIMMs (refer to "RAM SIMM Verification" 
in this section). 

5. Replace power supply. 



No sound from 
speaker 



1. Verify that the volume setting in the Control Panel 
is set to 1 or above. 

2. Replace speaker. 

3. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



Clock not 
running 



1. Replace battery (see "Battery Verification" in this 
section). 

2. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



4.10 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh llsi 






Systems seems to 
boot, then message 
"Finder is old version" 
displays 



1. Clear parameter RAM by holding down the 
<Command> <Option> <P> <R> keys and restarting 
the system. Continue to hold these keys down. You 
will hear the normal startup chords and about two 
seconds later you will hear another chord. This 
second chord means the parameter RAM has been 
cleared. 

2. Replace logic board. Retain customer's SIMMs. 



System restarts 
itself 



- Set the locking power switch on the rear of the unit 
to the unlocked (horizontal) position. 



Macintosh llsi 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.11 



□ MACINTOSH list FLOWCHARTS 



Flowchart 1 
Notes 



1. During a normal startup sequence, a medium 
pitched soft chord is emitted. If this does not 
happen, refer to "Startup and Error Chords" for 
additional information. If you cannot interpret the 
chords, continue with the flowchart. 

2. If exchanging the monitor will correct the problem, 
refer to the appropriate Technical Procedures to 
isolate the monitor problem to the module level. 

3. Refer to "RAM SIMM Verification" for complete 
instructions on verifying and troubleshooting the 
SIMMs. 



4. If the known-good SIMMs did not correct the 
problem, install the customer's SIMMs on the 
replacement logic board. 



4.12 / Troubleshooting 



Jan 91 



Macintosh llsi 



( FlowcharM ) 



Power on the system 
without installing a disk. 



Interpret error 

chords (see 

Note #1). 



Power off. If a hard disk is installed, 

disconnect the SCSI power connector 

and cable connector. 




Macintosh llsi 



Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.13 



Flowchart 2 1. Refer to the MacTest MP section of the Macintosh 

Notes Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh 

Family Technical Procedures for complete 

information. 

2. Refer to the SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures for complete instructions. 

3. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



4.14 / Troubleshooting Jan 91 Macintosh llsi 









Shut down and install 

another MacTest MP 

disk. Power on. 




YES 



Power off. If a hard disk is installed, 

remove the SCSI power and cable 

connector, or any external drive. 



i 



Insert MacTest MP disk. Power on. 




NO 



Run MacTest MP (see Note #1 ). 



C 



Go to Flowchart 5 



j 



( Flowchart 2 ) 

I 




Run MacTest MP (see Note #1 ). 



i 



Run Macintosh Hard Disk Test (see Note #2). 



® 



1 



Run MacTest MP (see Note #1 ). 




t 




Run Macintosh Hard Disk Test (see Note #2). 


f 

( end) 



-► 



1. Exchange drive cable. 

2. Exchange drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board 

(see Note #3). 



Macintosh llsi 



Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.15 



Flowcharts 
Notes 



1. If exchanging the monitor will correct the 
problem, refer to the appropriate Technical 
Procedures to isolate the monitor problem to the 
module level. 



Refer to "RAM SIMM Verification" for complete 
instructions on verifying and troubleshooting the 
SIMMs. 

Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



( Flowcharts^) 




i 



1 . Exchange power supply. 

2. Exchange logic board 

only (see Note #3). 



c 



i 



Go to Flowchart 4. 



j 



1. Exchange monitor 

(see Note #1). 

2. Exchange video cable. 

3. Exchange RAM SIMMs 

(see Note #2). 

4. Exchange logic board 

(see Note #3). 

5. Exchange power supply. 



4.16 / Troubleshooting 



Jan 91 



Macintosh llsi 






Flowchart 4 
Notes 



1. Refer to the MacTest MP section of the Macintosh 
Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh 
Family Technical Procedures for complete 
information. 



Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



( Flowchart 4 ) 



Insert MacTest MP disk. Power on. 




1. Exchange drive cable. 

2. Exchange disk drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #2). 



Run MacTest MP (see Note #1 ). 



Q Goto 



i 



Flowchart 5, 



ZJ 



Macintosh llsi 



Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.17 



Flowchart 5 
Notes 



1. Refer to the MacTest MP section of the Macintosh 
Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh 
Family Technical Procedures for complete 
information. 



2. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 

3. Refer to SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures for complete instructions. 

4. Customers must always get back the same system 
configurations they bring in. Refer to "Module 
Exchange Information" in this section. 



4.18 / Troubleshooting 



Jan 91 



Macintosh llsi 



C Rowchart5 ) 



Power off. Reconnect the 

SCSI drive (if installed). 

Power on. 




Run MacTest MP (see Note #1). 



i 



Run Macintosh Hard Disk Test 
(see Note #3). 



i 



Check that customer has correct 
configuration (see Note #4). 



( end) 



1 . Exchange SCSI power and 

connector cable. 

2. Exchange SCSI drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board 

(see Note #2). 



1. 

2. 
3. 

4. 


Exchange SCSI power and 

connector cable. 
Exchange SCSI drive. 
Exchange power supply. 
Exchange logic board 

(see Note #2). 



Macintosh llsi 



Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.19 



□ RAM SIMM VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



The service exchange logic board comes without RAM 
SIMMs. 



The RAM SIMMs installed on the customer's logic board 
may be defective. To verify a defective RAM SIMM, 
you must remove all the customer's RAM SIMMs and 
install known-good RAM SIMMs. Mark each known- 
good RAM SIMM with a dot of white correction fluid or 
a small sticker. Whatever you use, be sure it will not 
come off while you are testing. 



Materials Required 



If verifying 256K SIMMs, you will need four known- 
good 256K SIMMs. 

If verifying 1 MB SIMMs, you will need four known- 
good 1 MB SIMMs. 



Verification 



1. Remove the top cover . 



CAUTION: Before removing the SIMMs, be sure to use 
proper ESD procedures. If an ESD pad is not available, 
touch bare metal on the power supply before proceeding. 
Failure to use proper ESD procedures can result in 
damage to the logic board. 

2. Remove the customer's RAM SIMMs by using the 
SIMM removal tool. See the You Ougbta Know tab 
for SIMM tool use. 

Note: Record the number and the sizes of the RAM 
SIMMs. The customer should receive the same 
number and sizes back! 

3. Install four known-good RAM SIMMs. 

Note: Use only RAM SIMMs with 100 ns (or faster) 
fast-page-mode DRAMs. Do not use RAM SIMMs 
with 120 or 150 ns DRAMs. 

4. Switch on the system. If you hear the normal 
startup sequence, the system is working properly 
and you can proceed to test the customer's RAM 
SIMMs. 



■ 



4.20 / Troubleshooting 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 






5. Switch the system off, remove one of the known- 
good SIMMs, and install one of the customer's 
SIMMs. 

6. Switch on the system. If you hear the normal 
startup sequence, the customer's RAM SIMM is good. 

7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 to test each of the RAM 
SIMMs. Be sure to set defective RAM SIMMs 
where they will not be mixed up with good ones. 






Macintosh llsi Oct 90 Troubleshooting / 4.21 



□ BATTERY VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



The Macintosh Ilsi logic board contains one lithium 
battery. This battery maintains the clock and PRAM 
while the unit is powered off. 

WARNING: Lithium batteries, the type used in the 
Macintosh Ilsi, have a potential for explosion if improperly 
handled Follow the verification procedure exactly. 



Materials Required 



Voltmeter 



Verification 
Procedure 



1. Be sure power is off. Remove the top lid . 

2. Set the voltmeter range to measure 10 volts DC. 

3. Touch and hold the positive probe of the voltmeter 
to the positive side of the battery (Figure 4-1). 



+ Probe 



Battery 







Figure 4-1 

4. Touch and hold the ground probe of the voltmeter to 
the negative side of the battery. 

5. The reading for a good battery should be above 2.8 
volts. If the reading falls below 2.8 volts, replace 
the battery. Refer to Section 5, Additional 
Procedures, for replacement instructions. 



4.22 / Troubleshooting 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Ilsi 



fk Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llsi 

Section 5 - Additional Procedures 



□ CONTENTS 








5.2 


Battery Replacement 




5.2 


Introduction 




5.3 


Materials Required 




5.6 


Logic Board RAM Identification and Upgrades 




5.6 


Introduction 




5.6 


Identification 




5.6 


Upgrades 



Afote: If a step is underlined, instructions for that step 
can be found in Section 2, Take- Apart. 






Macintosh llsi Oct 90 Additional Procedures / 5.1 



□ BATTERY REPLACEMENT 

Introduction Lithium thionyl chloride batteries, the type used in the 

Macintosh Classic, have some potential for explosion or 
overheating if improperly handled. The following 
precautions should be taken when storing, handling, or 
disposing of lithium batteries: 

• Store lithium batteries in a designated, well-marked 
area with limited access. 

• Apple's lithium batteries are sealed in individual 
zip-lock wrappers. Upon receipt, inspect the 
batteries for integrity of their wrappers, and store 
them in the same packaging in which they were 
received or in a similar closed, heavy plastic bag. 

• Lithium batteries cannot be recharged. Do not 
attempt to recharge the battery. Doing so may cause 
the battery to overheat or explode. 

• Do not allow the leads or terminals to short-circuit. 
A short-circuited battery may overheat or explode. 

• Replace the battery with the correct Apple 
replacement battery only. Using an incorrect battery 
or a non-Apple battery may cause the battery to 
overheat or explode. 

• When installing the battery, ensure the correct 
polarity. The polarity markings on the battery must 
match those on the battery holder or circuit board. 
Failure to observe correct polarity may cause the 
battery to overheat or explode. 

• If the battery holder was provided with a cover, be 
sure to replace it. 

• If the dead battery has leads, remove them before 
disposing of the battery. 



5.2 / Additional Procedures Oct 90 Macintosh llsi 






• Do not dispose of the battery in a fire or incinerator. 
Doing so may cause the battery to explode. 

• In addition to its explosive potential, lithium is 
water-reactive and must be disposed of as a 
hazardous waste, as follows: 

Place the dead battery into the zip-lock wrapper and 
packaging from which you took the replacement 
battery. Mark the battery package DEAD and return 
it to Apple for proper disposal Exception ; If the 
battery is physically damaged (for example, leaking), 
do not return it to Apple; dispose of the battery 
locally according to your local ordinances. 

The long-life lithium battery in the Macintosh Ilsi 
should serve many years. Refer to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, to check the condition of the battery. 
If the battery should fail for some reason, replace it 
according to the following procedure. 



Materials Required 






Grounded workbench and wriststrap 

CAUTION: Use ESD precautions before removing or 
replacing the battery. Failure to do so may result in logic 
board failure. 



Macintosh Ilsi 



Oct 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.3 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover and NuBus card, if one is 
installed. 



i 



2. Locate the battery holder and battery (Figure 5-1) 
toward the center of the logic board. 



Battery Cover 



Logic Board 




Figure 5-1 Battery 






5.4 / Additional Procedures 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 



3. On one side of the battery holder, insert a small 
flat-blade screwdriver into the top and gently push 
the screwdriver down until the side tab pushes out. 
The battery holder cover will come loose; do the 
same on the other end and remove the cover from 
the holder. 

4. Grasp the battery between your thumb and 
forefinger and lift out the battery. 



Replace 1. Insert the new battery so the positive side of the 

battery is inserted into the positive-marked side of 
the holder (Figure 5-1). 






CAUTION: Be sure the positive side of the battery is in the 
correct location (see Figure 5-1). An incorrectly placed 
battery can damage the logic board. 

2. Replace the holder cover. 

3. Replace the NuBus card , if one was installed, and 
the top cover . 

4. Set the clock using the Control Panel. 



Macintosh llsi Oct 90 Additional Procedures / 5.5 



□ LOGIC BOARD RAM IDENTIFICATION AND UPGRADES 



Introduction 



The Macintosh Ilsi contains 1 MB of RAM soldered on 
the logic board (bank A). Additional RAM is provided 
in packages known as single in-line memory modules 
(SIMMs). A SIMM is a small circuit board with memory 
chips. The memory chips may be surface-mounted, or 
they may be mounted through the board. Each SIMM 
board has contacts on one edge that fit into sockets on 
the logic board. 

CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to damage from 
ESP and skin acid Handle only by the edges! 



i 



Identification 



The SIMMs are available with two sizes of RAM (256K 
and 1 MB) and various speeds. 

You must use 100 ns (or faster) SIMMs on the 
Macintosh Ilsi. Slower SIMMs (e.g., 120 ns) will cause 
serious timing problems. The RAM speed is usually 
indicated by the -xx number after the manufacturer's 
part number. For example, -8 indicates 80 ns SIMMs 
and -12 indicates 120 ns SIMMs. 

Note: When you are removing SIMMs from the logic 
board, use the SIMM removal tool. Instructions for 
using this tool are located in You Oughta Know. 



) 



Upgrades 



The following chart summarizes the configurations that 
the Macintosh Ilsi supports: 



RAM 


Bank A 


BankB 


1 MB 


1 MB on-board RAM 


Empty 


2 MB 


1 MB on-board RAM 


Four 256K SIMMs 


5 MB 


1 MB on-board RAM 


Four 1 MB SIMMs 



CAUTION: Other configurations, such as a single SIMM 
or a pair of different-size SIMMs, will not function correctly. 






5.6 / Additional Procedures 



Oct 90 



Macintosh Ilsi 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llsi 

Illustrated Parts List 



□ CONTENTS 



IPL.3 Macintosh llsi - System Exploded View 

(Figure 1) 
IPL.5 Adapter Cards (Figure 2) 



The figures and lists in this section include all piece 
parts that can be purchased separately from Apple for the 
Macintosh llsi, along with their part numbers. These are 
the only parts available from Apple. Refer to your Apple 
Service Programs manual for prices. 



Macintosh llsi Oct 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.1 




FIGURE 1 



IPL2 / Illustrated Parts List 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 



□ MACINTOSH llsi - 


- SYSTEM EXPLODED VIEW (Figure 1) 


Hem 


Part No. 


Description 


l 


630-5804 


Top Case 


2 


815-6247 


Light Pipe, Power Indicator 


3 


810-6030 


Fan Assembly 


4 


661-1616 


Power Supply 


5 


661-1615 


Logic Board 


6 


805-0961 


FDHD Carrier 


7 


661-0474 


1.4 MB FDHD Mechanism 


8 


844-0018- 


Screw, FDHD Carrier to FDHD 


9 


591-0025 


Cable, 1.4 MB FDHD, Internal 


10 


630-5803 


Bottom Case 


11 


865-0024 


Platinum Foot 


12 


810-6031 


Speaker/LED Assembly 


13 


661-0614 


HDA, 1" Internal, 40 MB, 3.5 SCSI 




661-0624 


HDA, 1" Internal, 80 MB, 3.5 SCSI 


14 


805-0980 


HDA Carrier 


15 


444-6104 


Screw, 6 - 32 x 0.250 (HDA carrier to HDA) 


16 


591-0027 


Cable, HDA, Power 


17 


591-0026 


Cable, HDA, Internal 


18 


699-5071 


Microphone Assembly 


19 


661-0519 


SIMM, 256K, SOJ, 80 ns 




661-0520 


SIMM, 1 MB, SOJ, 80 ns 




661-0546 


SIMM, 1 MB, SOJ, 80 ns, Parity 


20 


742-0011 


Lithium Battery (without leads) 


21 


590-0380 


Cable, AC Power, 110 V, Smoke 



Macintosh llsi 



rev. Mar 91 



Illustrated Parts List/ 1 PL3 






J&) 





FIGURE 2 



IPL4/ Illustrated Parts List 



Oct 90 



Macintosh llsi 






□ ADAPTER CARDS (Figure 2) 

Item Part No. Description 

1 450-0032 Thumbscrew, NuBus Adapter Card 

2 661-0645 NuBus Adaptor Card 

3 661-0644 030 Adaptor Card 

4 815-6246 Plastic Bracket, 030 Adapter Card 



' 



Macintosh llsi Oct 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.5 






* Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 

Technical Procedures 



□ TABLE OF CONTENTS 




Section 1 - 


1.3 


Product Description 


Basics 


1.3 


Features 




1.5 


Configurations 




1.6 


Options and Upgrades 




1.7 


Module Identification 




1.9 


Connector and Switch Identification 




1.12 


Theory of Operation 




1.12 


Introduction 




1.12 


Macintosh II and IIx Logic Boards 




1.21 


Macintosh Ilfx Logic Board 




1.29 


Power Supply 




1.29 


Floppy Disk Drives 




1.29 


SCSI Hard Disk Drives 




1.30 


Functional Overview 




1.32 


System Software 




1.32 


System Software 6.0.2 




1.33 


System Software 6.0.5 




1.34 


Other Information 




1.34 


High-Density Media 




1.36 


Programmer's Switch 




1.37 


Materials Required to Service the Macintosh 
II/IIx/IIfx 




1.38 


Specifications 


Section 2 - 


2.3 


Top Cover 


Take-Apart 


2.5 


Power Supply 




2.7 


Floppy Disk Drives 




2.9 


SCSI Hard Disk Drive 




2.11 


Identifying 20SC Revision A and B Drives 




2.13 


Drive Mount 




2.15 


SIMMs 




2.19 


Logic Board 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Apr 91 



Contents / i 



Section 3 - 


3.3 


Introduction to MacTest II/IIx 


Diagnostics 


3.4 


Copying Mactest II/IIx Disk 




3.4 


Using Your Backup Disk 




3.5 


Running MacTest II/IIx 




3.5 


Materials Required 




3.5 


Starting MacTest II/IIx 




3.7 


Installing the Loopbacks 




3.7 


Using the MacTest II/IIx Menus 




3.12 


Running the Tests 




3.14 


Diagnostic Sound Sampler 




3.14 


Introduction 




3.14 


Materials Required 




3.14 


Procedure 




3.15 


Introduction to AppleCAT II/IIx 




3.16 


Running AppleCAT II/IIx 




3.16 


Materials Required 




3.16 


Setting Up Test Station and UUT 




3.19 


Establishing Communication 




3.20 


Using the AppleCAT II/IIx Menus 




3.23 


Running the Tests 




3.25 


Repair Confirmation Code (RCC) 




3.26 


SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure 




3.26 


To Determine If a Jumper Is Needed 




3.27 


To Install the Jumper 



. 



Note: These procedures cover the operation of MacTest 
n/Hx only. Refer to the MacTest MP section of the 
Mac Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in Volume II of 
the Macintosh Family Technical Procedures for 
instructions on using MacTest MP on the Macintosh 

nfx 



Section 4 - 


4.2 


Introduction 


Troubleshooting 


4.2 


Before You Start 




4.2 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




4.2 


How to Use the Troubleshooting Flowcharts 




4.3 


Things to Remember 




4.5 


Module Exchange Information 




4.5 


Logic Board 




4.6 


Internal SCSI Hard Disk Drives 




4.6 


Macintosh Ilfx 1 MB SIMMs 



ii / Contents 



rev. Apr 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Section 5 - 

Additional 

Procedures 



4.7 


Startup and Error Chords 


4.7 


Introduction 


4.7 


Startup Chord 


4.7 


Error Chords 


4.8 


Summary 


4.10 


Symptom Chart 


4.10 


System Problems 


4.11 


Video Problems 


4.13 


Floppy Disk Drive Problems 


4.14 


SCSI Hard Disk Drive Problems 


4.15 


Peripheral Problems 


4.17 


Miscellaneous Problems 


4.19 


Troubleshooting Flowcharts 


4.28 


SIMM Verification 


4.28 


Introduction 


4.28 


Isolating a Defective SIMM 


4.29 


Verification 


4.30 


Verification Flowchart Notes 


4.32 


Battery Verification 


4.32 


Introduction 


4.32 


Materials Required 


4.32 


Verification Procedure 


4.34 


Customer's Configuration Chart 


5.3 


Batteries 


5.3 


Introduction 


5.3 


Overview 


5.5 


Battery Holder Board Installation 


5.9 


Battery Replacement 


5.10 


Logic Board RAM Identification and Upgrades 


5.10 


Introduction 


5.10 


Identification 


5.11 


Upgrades 


5.12 


Logic Board Upgrades 


5.12 


Macintosh IIx Logic Board Upgrade 


5.13 


Macintosh Ilfx Logic Board Upgrade 


5.14 


Macintosh II 


5.14 


Paged Memory Management Unit Upgrade 


5.15 


FDHD SuperDrive Upgrade 


5.18 


Macintosh Ilfx 


5.18 


SCSI Termination 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Apr 91 



Contents / iii 



Illustrated IPL.3 Macintosh II/IIx/IIfx — System Exploded 

Parts List View (Figure 1) 

IPL.5 Macintosh II — Logic Board (Figure 2) 

IPL.7 Macintosh IIx — Logic Board (Figure 3) 

IPL.9 Macintosh Ilfx — Logic Board (Figure 4) 

IPL.ll Macintosh Ilfx — Logic Board with Parity 
(Figure 5) 



©Apple Computer. Inc. 1990 and 1991. No portion of this document may be reproduced in any 
form without the written permission of Apple Computer, Inc. 

Macintosh, AppleTalk, A/UX, HyperCard, AppleCAT, ImageWriter, LaserWriter, Apple, and the 
Apple logo are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 

Apple Desktop Bus, FDHD, SuperDrive, QuickDraw, Finder, MacTest, EtherTalk, and AppleColor 
are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 

Motorola is a registered trademark of Motorola Corporation. Ethernet is a trademark of Xerox 
Corporation. Sony is a trademark of Sony Corporation. NuBus is a trademark of Texas 
Instruments. UNIX is a registered trademark of UNIX System Laboratories. MS-DOS and Microsoft 
are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. 

iv / Contents rev. Apr 91 Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



ft Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 

Section 1 - Basics 



□ CONTENTS 








1.3 


Product Description 




1.3 


Features 




1.5 


Configurations 




1.6 


Options and Upgrades 




1.7 


Module Identification 




1.9 


Connector and Switch Identification 




1.12 


Theory of Operation 




1.12 


Introduction 




1.12 


Macintosh II and IIx Logic Boards 




1.21 


Macintosh Ilfx Logic Board 




1.29 


Power Supply 




1.29 


Floppy Disk Drives 




1.29 


SCSI Hard Disk Drives 




1.30 


Functional Overview 




1.32 


System Software 




1.32 


System Software 6.0.2 




1.33 


System Software 6.0.5 




1.34 


Other Information 




1.34 


High-Density Media 




1.36 


Programmer's Switch 




1.37 


Materials Required to Service the Macintosh 
II/IIx/IIfx 




1.38 


Specifications 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics/ 1.1 



> 



M****** ^Drives ^ &,****» p^W*** 



5 A2KB° W 



A to 



**gS 




Stereo^* ' te / serial 

rg$»P M***** 

Bus 
\ntertaces 



scs\ 

Interface 



Stf"" N***** \ A20to2 40Vol 



Figure 



1-1 



N\aa 



tf**^ 1 * 



rev 



Aug 90 



A2 , Basics 






□ PRODUCT DESCRIPTION 



The Macintosh® II, IIx, and Ilfx are high-performance, 
open-architecture Macintosh computers. As the high- 
end computers of the Macintosh line, they were 
designed to run existing software while providing the 
power, flexibility, and expandability necessary for 
future applications. 



Features 



Figure 1-1. Features are divided into two categories- 
those common to the Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx and 
features specific to each model. Features common to 
each computer include: 



Two RS-422 serial interfaces 

SCSI interface with internal and external connectors 

Floppy interface supporting a maximum of two 

drives 

Stereo audio with internal speaker and a connector 

for attaching external speakers 

Two Apple Desktop Bus™ interfaces 

Battery backed-up real time clock chip 

Random-access memory packaged as single in-line 

memory modules (SIMMs) 

Floating-point math coprocessor 

Supports a maximum of two floppy drives and one 

half-height SCSI hard disk drive 

Six NuBus™ expansion slots 

"Soft" power switch 

120 volt to 240 volt universal power supply 

512K of ROM 



Macintosh II 



The Macintosh II has these additional features: 

• Motorola® MC68020 microprocessor operating at 
16 MHz 

• Motorola MC68881 math coprocessor 

• Address management unit (AMU) 

• Optional paged memory management unit (PMMU) to 
support multitasking operating systems such as 
Apple A/UX® 

• 1 megabyte 120-nsec RAM, expandable to 
8 megabyte 

• One 800K 3.5-inch disk drive (second drive 
optional) 

• 200 percent faster than a Macintosh SE 

• Macintosh system software version 6.0.2 or later 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .3 



Macintosh llx 



The Macintosh llx has these additional features: 



Motorola MC68030 microprocessor operating at 

16 MHz 

MC68030 has an on-chip paged memory management 

unit (PMMU) and a 256-byte data and instruction 

cache 

Motorola MC68882 math coprocessor 

4 megabytes of 100-nsec RAM, expandable to 

8 megabytes 

One 1.4 MB FDHD™ SuperDrive™ floppy disk 

drive (second drive optional) 

15 percent faster than a Macintosh II 

Macintosh system software version 6.0.2 or later 



Macintosh llfx 



The Macintosh llfx has these additional features: 



Motorola MC68030 microprocessor operating at 

40 MHz 

MC68030 has on-chip paged memory management 

unit (PMMU) and a 256-byte data and instruction 

cache 

Motorola MC68882 math coprocessor 

System memory hardware parity option 

4 MB of 80-nsec RAM (non-parity systems) or 

60-nsec RAM (parity systems), expandable to 8 MB 

Two 1.4 MB FDHD SuperDrive floppy disk drives 

120-pin processor direct slot for high-speed 

interfacing to the microprocessor 

SCSI interface supports direct memory access (DMA) 

for faster transfers and compatibility with new, 

higher-speed peripherals 

I/O processors for the two serial ports, two Apple 

Desktop Bus ports, and SCSI port 

32K of 25-nsec static RAM (data cache) 

30 to 80 percent faster than a Macintosh Ilci 

130 to 300 percent faster than a Macintosh llx 

NuBus slots implement 32-bit address and data paths 

Macintosh system software version 6.0.5 or later 



1 .4 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Configurations 



The Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx are available from Apple 
in various configurations. These configurations are 
described below. 



Macintosh II 



Single 800K 3.5-inch floppy disk drive 

Single 800K 3.5-inch floppy disk drive and 40 MB 

hard disk 



Macintosh IIx 



Single FDHD SuperDrive 

Single FDHD SuperDrive and 80 MB hard disk 



Macintosh Ilfx 



• Dual FDHD SuperDrives 

• Dual FDHD SuperDrives and 80 MB hard disk 

• Dual FDHD SuperDrives and 160 MB hard disk 

• Dual FDHD SuperDrives and 80 MB hard disk with 
Apple A/UX 

• Dual FDHD SuperDrives, 80 MB hard disk, and 
parity memory 

These are not the only possible configurations. Apple 
offers a number of options to enhance the operation and 
performance of these systems. These options are 
described later in this section. Also, third-party 
manufacturers offer a wide variety of products which 
can be installed. You may see systems with different 
amounts of RAM, different sizes and capacities of hard 
disk drives, NuBus cards, and external peripherals. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .5 



Options and 
Upgrades 



The following options and upgrades are available from 
Apple: 



Second internal 800K or FDHD SuperDrive 3. 5- inch 

disk drive 

1.4 MB Apple FDHD SuperDrive disk drive upgrade 

for the Macintosh II 

20-, 40-, 80-, and 160-megabyte internal and 

external SCSI hard disk drives 

68851 paged memory management unit (PMMU) for 

the Macintosh II (required to run Apple A/UX) 

1-, 2-, and 4-megabyte memory expansion kits 

Macintosh IIx logic board upgrade for the 

Macintosh II 

Macintosh Ilfx logic board upgrade for the 

Macintosh II and IIx 



Revised 
Macintosh II 
Logic Board 



A revised logic board with upgraded ROMs is available 
for the Macintosh II. This logic board has four revision 
"B" ROMs. The revised logic board with upgraded 
ROMs for the Macintosh II is not necessary unless you 
are using a NuBus card that requires more than 1 MB of 
address space. 



Macintosh Ilfx 
Parity Option 



Macintosh Ilfx systems can be ordered with an optional 
parity-checking feature. Parity checking verifies 
integrity of information stored in system RAM. The 
parity option is not field-installable and must be 
specified when you order your system. 



A/UX Users 



To maintain system functionality, A/UX customers 
planning to use the Macintosh IIx or Ilfx and/or FDHD 
SuperDrive must upgrade A/UX software to version 
1.0.1. 






1 .6 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/ilx/llfx 



Module Identification 



An exploded view of the system unit with field 
serviceable modules is shown in Figure 1-2. Additional 
module identification is available in the Apple Service 
Technical Procedures Module Identification manual. 
Information in the Module Identification manual 
supersedes the information available in this manual. 




SCSI Hard Disk 
(optional) 



Floppy Disk Drive 



Power Supply 



Logic Board 



Figure 1-2 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .7 



FDHD and 800K 
Drive Identification 



Figure 1-3. The FDHD disk drive cannot be 
distinguished from the 800K format disk drive without 
first removing the computer's cover (see Section 2, 
Take-Apart). With the cover removed, locate the 
microswitches at the front of the drive. The FDHD has 
three microswitches; the 800K drive has only two 
microswitches. 



i 





800K Drive 



1.4 MB Drive 



Figure 1-3 

Figure 1-4. You can also identify a FDHD drive by 
checking the manufacturer's label on the bottom of the 
drive; 2MB has been added to the label on all high- 
density drives. 



SONY® 2MB 

MODEL MP-FXXX-XXG 

Made in Japan 
4-873-458-01 



Figure 1-4 






1 .8 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Connector and 
Switch Identification 



Figure 1-5. The Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx have six 
interface connectors, two power connectors, six NuBus 
card openings, and a power switch on their rear panels. 
The programmer's switch is located at the right rear of 
the computer. Pin-outs and signal descriptions for the 
interface connectors can be found in the Apple Service 
Technical Procedures Peripheral Interface Guide. 




fiteh SSS SMMB \ SCSIPort I Pov 

Jack Apple Desktop NuBus Card Openings 

Bus Ports 



Figure 1-5 

Figure 1-6. The Macintosh Ilfx has six NuBus slots, a 
120-pin processor-direct slot; one ROM and eight 
DRAM SIMM sockets; and connectors for power, two 
floppy drives, the internal speaker, the SCSI hard disk 
signal, and the SCSI hard disk power cable. 

The Macintosh II and IIx have the same connectors with 
two exceptions: The Macintosh II does not have a ROM 
SIMM socket, and neither the Macintosh II or IIx have 
the 120-pin processor-direct slot. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .9 



SCSI Hard Disk 
Power Connector 



NuBus 
Slots 



SCSI Hard Disk 
Signal Connector 



Power Switch 




Logic Board Power / Floppy Drivel Speaker 

Floppy Drive 2 

Macintosh ll/llx 



Interrupt 
Switch 



Reset 

Switch 



RAM 
SIMM 
Sockets 



i 



SCSI Hard Disk 
PowerConnector 



SCSI Hard Disk 
Signal Connector 



Power Switch 




Logic Board Power 



Processor Direct Slot 



Floppy Drive 1 

Macintosh llfx 



Interrupt 
'Switch 

Reset 

Switch 

RAM 
-SIMM 
Sockets 



Figure 1-6 



1.10 /Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Two other items concerning the internal connectors 
should be noted: 

• The SCSI hard disk power connector on the 
Macintosh Ilfx is a 2-pin x 2-pin square connector, 
while the Macintosh II and IIx use a 4-pin x 1-pin 
rectangular connector. Be sure you have the correct 
cable when exchanging SCSI hard disks. 

• While the Macintosh Ilfx PDS connector is 
physically the same as the cache memory card slot in 
the Macintosh Ilci, these slots are electrically 
different and cards designed for one computer 
cannot be used in the other. 

CAUTION: If a Macintosh Ilci cache card is installed 
in the Macintosh Ilfx expansion slot, or vice-versa, 
damage to the card and logic board are likely. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Basics / 1 .1 1 



□ THEORY OF OPERATION 



Introduction 



The Macintosh II, IIx, and life are made up of three 
modules: the logic board, power supply, and FDHD 
SuperDrive (Macintosh Ilx/IIfx) or 800K disk drive 
(Macintosh II). This section presents an overview of 
each of these modules and a functional description of 
the system as a whole. The main logic boards for the 
Macintosh II and IIx are similar and are described 
together with differences noted where appropriate. 
The Macintosh Ilfx logic board is different and is 
described separately. The power supplies and floppy 
disk drives used in all three computers are the same 
and are described after the logic boards. 



i 



The information here will give you an understanding of 
how each module of the computer works, as well as 
how the system functions. This will assist you in 
performing logical troubleshooting of the Macintosh II, 
IIx, and Ilfx computers. 



Macintosh II 
and IIx Logic 
Boards 



The design and operation of the Macintosh II and IIx 
logic boards is very similar. Differences between them 
are noted where appropriate. Figure 1-7 is a simplified 
block diagram. Figure 1-8 shows the major logic board 
components. 




NuBus 
Slots 




VIA1 



SCC (A) 



-\ 



IWMor 
SWIM 





,„L„ 






VIA2 




L. 

SCC (B) 




•; Apple 
: Sound 
: : Chip 



Apple 

Desktop 

Bus 



Batteries \J Power Supply' 
:• :. Connector 



Figure 1-7 



1.12/ Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



GLU 



NuBus 
Interface 



Real Time Clock 



SCSI 



VIAs SCC ADB 




Interrupt 
Switch 



Reset 
Switch 



DRAM 
SIMMs 



HMMU 
or PMMU 
(Mac II only) 



IWM (Mac II) 

or 
SWIM (Mac llx) 



MC68881 (Mac II) 

or MC68020 (Mac II) 
MC68882(Macllx) or 

Apple MC68030 (Mac llx) 

Sound Chip 



Sony Sound Chip 



Macintosh II and llx 



Figure 1-8 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics/ 1.13 



Microprocessor 



The Macintosh II contains a 68020 microprocessor that 
supports both 24- and 32-bit processing modes. The 
68030 microprocessor in the Macintosh IIx is a true 32- 
bit processor, yet it also supports 24- and 32-bit 
processing modes. Both microprocessors run at 15.6672 
MHz for high performance. When running in the 24-bit 
processing mode, the Macintosh II and Macintosh IIx 
are compatible with the majority of existing Macintosh 
applications. 

The 68030 is an enhanced version of the 68020. In 
addition to the features of the 68020, the 68030 also 
includes an integrated paged memory management unit 
(PMMU) to support multitasking operating systems such 
as Apple A/UX. The 68030 also features a 256-byte data 
cache to provide fast access to commonly used 
instructions. This data cache results in approximately a 
15 percent increase in performance over the 68020. 






Math Coprocessor 



The 68881 math coprocessor in the Macintosh II and the 
68882 coprocessor in the Macintosh IIx are IEEE P754 
standard floating-point ICs. Each provides a high 
degree of precision and speed for Macintosh programs. 



Address 

Management Unit 
(Macintosh II only) 



The address management unit (AMU) is in the 
Macintosh II only. The AMU, also called the Hochsprung 
memory management unit (HMMU), allows the Macintosh 
II to run Macintosh software in the 24-bit address mode of 
68000-based Macintoshes, and run Macintosh II software 
in the 32-bit address mode. 



Paged Memory 
Management Unit 



The 68851 paged memory management unit (PMMU) is 
available as an option to replace the HMMU in the 
Macintosh II. In the Macintosh IIx, the PMMU is an 
integral part of the 68030 microprocessor. The PMMU, 
in addition to providing 24- to 32-bit address 
translation, also provides memory management 
capabilities to support multitasking capabilities such as 
virtual, protected, and shared memory. These features 
allow the use of the UNIX® operating system in the 
form of Apple A/UX in addition to the Macintosh 
operating system and compatibility with older 
applications. 



1.14/ Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






GLU Chip The general logic unit (GLU) IC is an Apple-designed 

custom gate array that performs a variety of support 
functions for the microprocessor. The GLU chip 
provides address decoding and chip select; RAM refresh; 
CPU, SCC, and VIA clock signal generation; and NuBus, 
VTA, SCC, power, and NMI switch interrupt handling. 



RAM Random-access memory (RAM) is provided in packages 

known as single in-line memory modules (SIMMs). Each 
SIMM consists of a small printed circuit board with 
various configurations of surface-mounted dynamic RAM 
(DRAM) chips. On one edge of each SIMM is a contact 
that fits into the SIMM sockets located on the logic 
board. 

The amount of RAM on the logic board can be changed 
by installing the same size SIMMs in either Bank A or 
B, with the larger RAM size in Bank A (the first four 
rows closest to the edge of the board). 

Various RAM configurations are possible, depending on 
how many SIMMs are used and on the size of the DRAM 
chips. 

Every time the Macintosh II or IIx is powered on, the 
system ROMs performs a memory test to determine how 
much RAM is present in the machine. 



ROM— The Macintosh II has 256K of nonvolatile read-only 

Macintosh II memory. Four 512K x 8-bit dual-in line (DIP) devices 

are used. All four ROMs are read simultaneously, 
providing a 32-bit data word. These ROMs contain the 
Macintosh ToolBox, operating system support, 
diagnostics, and self-tests. 

ROM replacement and upgrades are performed by 
replacing one or more ROMs. The Macintosh II logic 
board is designed to also accept 1 megabit (128K 
x 8-bit) devices providing a maximum of 512K of ROM. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Basics / 1 .15 



ROM- 
Macintosh llx 



The Macintosh llx has 256K of nonvolatile read-only 
memory. Four 512K x 8-bit surface-mount devices are 
used. These four ROMs are then attached to a small 
printed circuit board for installation in the ROM SIMM 
socket provided. All four ROMs are read 
simultaneously, providing a 32-bit data word. These 
ROMs contain the Macintosh ToolBox, operating system 
support, diagnostics, and self-tests. These ROM chips 
also include code supporting the FDHD disk drive and 
SWIM disk controller chip. 

ROM replacement and upgrades are performed by 
replacing the entire ROM SIMM. The Macintosh llx 
logic board is designed to also accept 1 megabit (128K 
x 8-bit) devices providing a maximum of 512K of ROM. 






Versatile 
Interface 
Adapters 



The Macintosh II and Macintosh llx contain two 
SY6522A versatile interface adapters (VI As). These 
chips, known as VIA1 and VIA2, provide maximum 
compatibility with existing Macintosh software. 

VIA1 provides the system with most of the signals from 
the 68000-based Macintosh configuration. It also 
provides access to new features, including an Apple 
Desktop Bus interrupt and a synchronous modem signal. 

VIA2 controls the HMMU (Macintosh II only); decodes 
the NuBus slot interrupts, a SCSI interrupt, and the 
Apple sound chip interrupt; powers the unit off; blocks 
NuBus accesses to RAM; and determines errors that 
occur in NuBus transactions. 



Real-Time 
Clock 



The real-time clock is an Apple-custom chip. It contains 
256 bytes of RAM that is powered by two lithium 
batteries when external power is turned off. These 
RAM bytes are called parameter RAM. They store the 
configuration of ports, the clock setting, and other data 
that need to be preserved even when external AC 
power is not available. 






1.16/ Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Input /Output 
Interfaces 



The Macintosh II and Hx, like all Macintosh computers, 
contain a number of input/output interfaces: 

• Two RS-422 serial ports - The serial ports include 
support for a synchronous modem and are controlled 
by the serial communications controller (SCO 
circuitry. 

• Two Apple Desktop Bus ports - This is a low-speed 
serial interface that provides communication 
between the CPU and input devices. 

• Floppy disk interface - The Macintosh IIx floppy 
interface can support two internal FDHD disk drives 
and is controlled by the SWIM chip. The Macintosh 
II floppy interface can support two internal 800K 
disk drives and is controlled by the IWM chip. 

• SCSI interface - Supports an optional internal SCSI 
hard drive and up to six additional external SCSI 
devices. This interface is controlled by the 53C80 
SCSI controller circuitry. 

• Stereo sound port - The Macintosh II and IIx have 
stereo sound capability. Sound is controlled by the 
Apple and Sony™ Sound Chip circuitry. 

• NuBus expansion interface - The Macintosh II and 
IIx have six NuBus expansion slots. NuBus is a 32- 
bit bus designed by Texas Instruments for system 
expansion. 



RS-422 Serial 
Interfaces 



The two serial ports are controlled by an 8530 serial 
communications controller (SCC). Port 1, the modem 
port, can be programmed for asynchronous or 
synchronous protocols. Port 2, the printer port, can be 
programmed for asynchronous or AppleTalk® operation. 
The serial ports conform to the EIA RS-422 standard. 
These ports are used mainly for (though not limited to) 
connecting the Macintosh II and IIx to AppleTalk 
networks, serial printers, and modems. 

The Macintosh II and IIx use two mini DIN-8 connectors 
for the two ports. These are the same connectors found 
on all Macintosh computers since the Macintosh Plus. 
The ports provide an output handshake but do not 
provide the +5 and +12 volts found on the Macintosh 
128K, 512K, and 512K enhanced serial ports. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics/ 1.17 



Apple 
Desktop Bus 



The Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) is a low-speed serial 
communication bus used to connect input devices to the 
computer. ADB can be used to connect devices such as 
keyboards and pointing devices. ADB devices connect 
to the computer via a mini DIN-4 connector on the rear 
panel. 



All devices that are made for the Apple Desktop Bus 
have some kind of microprocessor that makes them 
intelligent devices. All external ADB devices, except 
the mouse, have a second ADB connector for connecting 
to other ADB devices. Because it has no connector, the 
mouse must be the last device attached to the Apple 
Desktop Bus. 



Floppy Interface 
Macintosh II 



The Macintosh II is capable of supporting two internal 
800K 3.5-inch drives. The disk interface uses the Apple 
custom "Integrated Woz Machine" (IWM) chip to control 
the drives. Together with the VIA, the IWM generates 
all the signals needed to read, write, format, and eject 
disks. The disk interface on the Macintosh II supports 
up to two internal drives and no external drives. 



The IWM is clocked at 15.6672 MHz, which is twice the 
frequency used in previous Macintosh systems. An 
internal "divide by two" circuit is used to access 400K 
or 800K drives. 

An upgrade is available that allows the Macintosh II to 
use the 1.4 MB FDHD SuperDrive. The upgrade 
replaces the IWM with a SWIM disk controller and 
includes new system ROMs with extensions to support 
the new disk controller and high-density drive. 



1.18 /Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Floppy Interface 
Macintosh llx 



The SWIty chip in the Macintosh llx is a complete 
multimode floppy disk interface on a single IC. The 
SWIM is an enhanced version of its predecessor, the 
IWM, found in the Macintosh, Macintosh Plus, SE, and 
II. The SWIM chip incorporates the features of the 
IWM and provides the additional capability to read, 
write, and format in both group coded recording (GCR) 
and modified frequency modulation (MFM) data formats. 
The SWIM chip interprets, converts, and outputs dual- 
disk (clock/time) and file (data) signals as appropriate 
for either GCR (variable rotational speed) or MFM 
(constant rotational speed) format. This arrangement 
provides the capability to read, write, and format Apple 
400K and 800K data disks (GCR), MS-DOS 720K data 
disks (MFM), and Apple or MS-DOS high-density (1.4 
MB) data disks (MFM). The disk interface on the 
Macintosh llx supports up to two internal drives and no 
external drives. 



Small Computer 
System Interface 
(SCSI) 



The Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) consists 
of the 53C80 SCSI controller IC, an internal 50-pin 
connector to connect an optional internal SCSI hard 
disk, and an external DB-25 connector to attach up to 
six additional external SCSI devices. The SCSI 
controller is connected directly to both connectors, and 
it controls the high-speed parallel port for 
communicating with up to seven SCSI peripherals. Each 
SCSI device has a unique address. This address is used 
to direct information between devices. The Macintosh 
computer is always address 7. The optional internal 
hard disk is address 0. External SCSI devices can be 
addressed from to 6. (If an internal hard disk is 
installed, address cannot be used.) 



The Apple SCSI interface differs from the industry SCSI 
standard in two ways: 

• A DB-25 connector is used instead of the standard 
50-pin "D" connector to attach external SCSI 
devices. The Apple SCSI System Cable is available 
to convert the connector to the standard. 

• Power for termination resistors is not provided. If 
the attached SCSI device does not have the required 
terminator resistor, the external device must either 
include a built-in terminator or provide power for 
an external terminator. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics/ 1.19 



Stereo 
Sound Port 



The Apple sound chip generates a stereo audio signal. 
This signal is buffered by two Sony audio chips that 
filter the pulse-width-modulated (PWM) signal and 
drive the internal speaker (mono) or external audio 
port (stereo). 



i 



NuBus 
Interface 



The Macintosh II and Macintosh IIx have six expansion 
slots to support Apple standard peripherals and increase 
RAM size. Each expansion slot is a 96-pin DIN 
connector that uses the NuBus interface to communicate 
with the system. The following are a few of the cards 
that will go into the NuBus slots: 



Video cards 

Coprocessor cards 

RAM cards 

Ethernet™, Token Ring, 

interface cards 

Data acquisition cards 



and other network 



The NuBus has three major states of communication 
with the Macintosh II and Macintosh IIx systems: 

• Processor Bus to NuBus, which is activated 
whenever the microprocessor generates a physical 
slot address. If a device responds, the data is 
transferred. 

• NuBus to Processor Bus, which is for access to 
RAM, ROM, and I/O to and from NuBus. Two 
control functions are being performed for this 
process. One tracks the changes on NuBus, and the 
other lets the 68020/68030 tell NuBus what to do 
next. 

• NuBus timeout, which is required to prevent access 
to empty slots. Accessing empty slots would hang 
the system. 

Every NuBus card should contain a ROM that provides 
information to the operating system at startup. The 
ROM information ensures that drivers are properly 
installed and that the card is initialized and recognized 
by the system. 






1 .20 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Macintosh llfx 
Logic Board 



There are two versions of the Macintosh llfx logic 
board — one with the parity generator chip (PGC) and 
one without. The logic boards are identical in all other 
respects. Figure 1-9 shows the major logic board 
components. Figure 1-10 is a simplified block diagram. 



Operating 
System 
Support 



BIU2 

NuBus 

Interface 



BIU30 

NuBus 
Interface 



Apple 
Sound 



SCSI/DMA Chip SWIM SWIM PIC Serial PIC 



SCC 




DRAM 
SIMMs 



Fast 

Memory 

Controller 

MC68030 



Sony Sound Chips MC68882 Parity Chip RAM Cache ROM SIMM 

(Optional) 



ACT2157 
Cache 



Macintosh llfx 



Figure 1-9 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics/ 1.21 



CPU 

Motorola 
MC68030 
40Mhz 



Control 



Fast 
Memory 

Controller 
(FMC) 



-"' 



RAM 

Read-Write 
Memory 
1-8MB 

60/80 NS 



ROM SIMM 

1 MEG X 32-bit 

120NS 



CACHE RAM 

32 X 32-bit 

25 NS 



Fast/Slow 
Buffers 



Motorola 

MC68882 

Floating Point 

Co-Processor 

40Mhz 




DSACK1.0 
IRQ (1-6) 





Decode 
Logic 


RAM Select ^ 




ROM Select 




I/O Select ^ 




NuBus Select fc 


FPU Select 





I 




Slow AS 



Slow PS 



Slow RW 



Buffer Enable 



■*»- 



Buffer Slow 



2157 
Tag 


HALT fc 


BERR fc 






Internal 
Speaker 



>^v Stereo 
\S) Phono 
Jack 



USE 



3 



Port for Internal 
Hard Disk 



SWIM 
Floppy Disk 

Controller 



-CZ 



' Ports for Internal 
Floppy Disk Drives 



External SCSI Port 
DB-25 



6a\ Apple 
$£/ Desktop 
£73\ Bus Ports 



sec 

Zilog 8530 

Serial 

Communications 

Controller 



VS£/ Mini DIN-4 



Drivers 
and Receivers 



Serial Ports 
Mini DIN-8 



12 3 4 5 6 
NuBus Connectors 



Figure 1-10 



1 .22 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Microprocessor 



The Macintosh Ilfx contains a Motorola MC68030 1 6-bit 
microprocessor operating at 33 MHz. This processor is 
completely software compatible with all versions of the 
68000, 68020, and 68030 used in other computers in the 
Macintosh family. The Macintosh Ilfx will run most 
existing Macintosh applications without modification. 

Another feature of the 68030 is burst-mode memory 
access. This method of accessing memory allows the 
processor to read and write groups of instructions or 
data in less time than reading and writing individually. 
When the instruction or data to be fetched isn't in 
either the internal 256-byte or the external 32K cache, 
the processor performs a burst-mode access and fetches 
four long-words (32-bit words) from memory. Data 
latches are also used to improve throughput during 
memory writes. 



Math Coprocessor 



The 68882 math coprocessor in the Macintosh Ilfx is an 
IEEE P754 standard floating-point IC. The 68882 
provides a high degree of precision and speed for 
Macintosh programs. 



Operating System 
Support (OSS) 
ASIC 



The operating system support (OSS) IC performs a 
variety of support functions for the system. The OSS 
includes elements of the 65C22 VIA, I/O device 
decoding and timing, interrupt prioritization and 
masking, a 56-bit system counter, bus timeout logic, 
interface support for the real time clock chip, and 
DSACK generation. 



RAM 



Random-access memory for the Macintosh Ilfx is 
provided using the same SIMM technology that is used 
in the Macintosh II and IIx. However, the manner in 
which the microprocessor accesses this memory is 
different. In the Macintosh II and IIx, the 68020/68030 
reads and writes memory via the same data bus. In the 
Macintosh Ilfx, memory reads and writes occur on 
separate data buses. This separation allows memory to 
be read and written simultaneously. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics/ 1.23 



The amount of RAM on the logic board can be changed 
by installing the same size SIMMs in either Bank A or 
B, with the larger RAM size in Bank A (the four 
sockets nearest the rear of the computer). Although the 
rules for configuring memory are the same for the 
Macintosh Ilfx as for the Macintosh II and IIx, the 
possible memory configurations are different. This is 
because the Macintosh Ilfx cannot use 256K SIMMs. 
Therefore, it is not possible to have 1-, 2-, or 5- 
megabyte systems. 

Every time the Macintosh Ilfx is powered on, the 
system software performs a memory test to determine 
how much RAM is present in the machine. 



RAM Cache 



The Macintosh Ilfx has a 32K RAM cache for storing the 
most frequently used data and instructions. This cache 
is an extension of the 68030's internal 256-byte cache. 
The RAM cache is made up of four 8K x 8-bit static 
RAMs and an ACT2157 cache tag. The cache tag serves 
as a pointer for the CPU to locate information stored in 
the RAM cache. This RAM cache can be accessed by the 
CPU in 25 nsec (vs. 60 or 80 nsec for SIMM RAM 
accesses) with no wait states. 



Fast Memory 
Controller (FMC) 



The Fast (Fitch) Memory Controller (FMC) is an 
integrated dynamic RAM and cache memory controller. 
It supports the MC68030 microprocessor's burst mode 
to access memory. The FMC supports two banks of 1-, 
4-, or 16-megabit DRAMs and caches up to 128K. 



The FMC also requires several other support ICs— the 
tag RAM, four static RAMs (cache memory), and four 
data latches. 



Parity Generator 
Chip (PGC) 



The Macintosh Ilfx can be ordered with a parity 
checking option. Parity is generated by the parity 
generator chip (PGC). If the parity chip is installed and 
parity checking is required, then the system must use 
9-bit DRAM SIMMs. If parity checking is not needed, 
then 8-bit DRAMs can be used and parity checking will 
not take place. 



1 .24 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






If the PGC is present, the parity bit is always written. 
If the bit is not physically present (not using 9-bit 
SIMMs), it is ignored. If 9-bit SIMMs are being used 
when a read takes place in the RAM address space, the 
PGC generates an internal parity bit from each byte of 
the data bus, and compares it to the bit read from the 
SIMM's parity bit. If the two parity bits do not agree 
and parity is enabled, the PGC generates two outputs: 
one that interrupts the processor and the other that 
indicates a parity error. If a parity error occurs, the 
system will have to be reset. 



ROM The Macintosh Ilfx has 256K of nonvolatile read-only 

memory. Four 512K x 8-bit surface-mount ROMs are 
used. These four ROMs are then attached to a small 
printed circuit board for installation in the ROM SIMM 
socket. All four ROMs are read simultaneously, 
providing a 32-bit data word. These ROMs contain the 
Macintosh ToolBox; operating system support; 32-bit 
QuickDraw™; support for 32-bit addressing, the 
peripheral interface controllers, and SCSI DMA; FDHD 
SuperDrive extensions; diagnostics; and self-tests. 



ROM replacement and upgrades are performed by 
replacing the entire ROM SIMM. The Macintosh Ilfx 
logic board is designed to accept 1-megabit (128K x 8- 
bit) devices providing 512K of ROM. 



Peripheral Interface The Macintosh Ilfx is the first Macintosh computer to 

Controllers include dedicated I/O processors. An input/output 

processor (IOP) is a processor dedicated to a specific 
task or tasks that are normally performed by the main 
CPU. In all previous Macintosh computers, low-level 
communications with external devices were handled by 
the main processor. This resulted in reduced 
performance since each time a peripheral required 
attention, the main processor was diverted from its 
primary function — running applications. IOPs provide 
the ability to off-load some of the support required by 
the peripheral device interfaces. A total of three IOPs 
are utilized in the Macintosh Ilfx. Two IOPs are 
implemented as stand-alone peripheral interface 
controllers (PICs). One PIC supports the 8530 serial 
communications controller (SCO; the other supports the 
SWIM disk controller and Apple Desktop Bus interface. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Basics / 1 .25 



The third IOP is included in the same IC as the 5380 
SCSI controller. This chip is described later in this 
section. 

Each PIC includes a 65CX02 microprocessor operating 
at 2 MHz, a 16-bit timer, two DMA controllers, two 
digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs), and a RAM 
expansion bus to support an external 43256 32K x 8-bit 
static RAM. The PIC communicates with the host 68030 
via this RAM. 



Real-Time 
Clock 



The real-time clock is the same custom Apple chip as 
in the Macintosh II and IIx. Refer to the Macintosh 
II/IIx logic board theory of operation for information 
on the real-time clock. 



Input /Output 
Interfaces 



The Macintosh Ilfx has the same input/output interfaces 
as the Macintosh II and IIx. However, each interface — 
except the stereo sound port — has been enhanced to 
improve performance. 



Two RS-422 serial ports - The serial ports include 
support for a synchronous modem and are controlled 
by the Serial Communications Controller (SCC), 
Peripheral Interface Controller (PIC), and associated 
circuitry. 

Floppy disk interface - The Macintosh Ilfx floppy 
interface can support two internal FDHD disk drives 
and is controlled by the SWIM and a second PIC 
chip. 

SCSI interface - The Macintosh Ilfx SCSI interface 
supports an optional internal SCSI hard drive and up 
to six additional external SCSI devices. This 
interface is controlled by the SCSI/DMA controller 
chip. 

Apple Desktop Bus - This is a low-speed serial 
interface used to provide communication between 
the CPU and input devices. 

Stereo sound port - The Macintosh Ilfx has stereo 
sound capability. Sound is controlled by the Apple 
and Sony Sound Chip circuitry. 



1.26 /Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






120-pin processor direct slot - This expansion slot 
provides direct access to the MC68030 
microprocessor bus and allows high-speed 
interaction. 

NuBus expansion interface - The Macintosh Ilfx 
uses the same NuBus expansion interface as on the 
Macintosh II and IIx. The Ilfx implementation 
supports full 32-bit address and data paths. In 
addition, the processor-to-NuBus interface has 
several new custom chips that have replaced 
discrete components. 



RS-422 Serial 
Interfaces 



The two RS-422 serial interfaces are the same as those 
on the Macintosh II and IIx with one exception — to 
improve throughput on the Ilfx, an input/output 
processor has been added. Refer to the Macintosh 
II/IIx logic board theory of operation for information 
on the RS-422 interfaces. Information on the serial IOP 
can be found in "Peripheral Interface Controllers" 
earlier in this section. 



Apple Desktop Bus 
Interface 



The Apple Desktop Bus interface on the Macintosh Ilfx 
functions identically to the ADB interface on the 
Macintosh II and IIx. However, ADB functions are 
included in the SWIM/ADB IOP. Refer to the 
Macintosh II/IIx logic board theory of operation for 
information on the Apple Desktop Bus interface. 
Information on the SWIM/ADB IOP can be found in 
"Peripheral Interface Controllers" earlier in this 
section. 



Floppy Interface 



The floppy interface used in the Macintosh Ilfx uses the 
same SWIM disk controller chip used in the Macintosh 
IIx. Improved performance is provided by the 
SWIM/ADB IOP. Refer to the Macintosh II/IIx logic 
board theory of operation for information on the floppy 
interface. Information on the SWIM/ADB IOP can be 
found in "Peripheral Interface Controllers" earlier in 
this section. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .27 



SCSI DMA 



A custom version of the NCR 53C80 SCSI controller is 
provided in the Macintosh Ilfx. This Apple-designed 
ASIC includes the circuitry of the 53C80 plus direct 
memory access (DMA) support and a peripheral 
interface controller. This combination provides a high 
speed interface between the Small Computer Systems 
Interface (SCSI) and the 68030 bus. Data transfers and 
bus arbitration are handled independently from the 
MC68030. This new SCSI/DMA chip is fully compatible 
with all features of and software written for the 53C80 
SCSI chip. SCSI transfer times can be increased by up 
to 400 percent. The SCSI/DMA chip also supports 
greater bandwidth to support the future generation of 
higher-speed SCSI devices. 



Stereo Sound 
Port 



The Apple and Sony Sound Chips used in the Macintosh 
Ilfx are the same as in the Macintosh II and IIx. Refer 
to the Macintosh II/IIx logic board theory of operation 
for information on the sound chips. 



Processor 
Direct Slot 



The processor direct slot provides direct access to 
the MC68030 microprocessor bus. Providing direct 
access to the CPU bus rather than going through NuBus 
results in increased throughput for the device. This 
slot is similar to the PDS slot in the Macintosh SE/30 
except they operate at different clock speeds. 
Note that this slot is not electrically compatible with 
the Ilci cache card slot — cards cannot be interchanged 
between systems. Logic board damage can occur if a 
Macintosh Ilex cache card is installed in a Macintosh 
Ilfx or vice-versa. 



To prevent the installation of all six NuBus cards plus a 
PDS-type card, the PDS slot has been aligned with 
NuBus slot E. This allows only a PDS-type card and 
five NuBus cards or six NuBus cards to be installed. 



NuBus Interface 



The six NuBus slots on the Macintosh Ilfx function the 
same as the slots in the Macintosh II and IIx. However, 
a number of discrete components used to implement the 
NuBus interface have been combined into three new 
parts. 






1.28 /Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



NuBus Bus 
Interface Units 
(BlUs) 



NuBus interface support is provided by two ASICs — 
BIU30 and BIU2. These two ICs provide the interface 
between NuBus and the 68030. BIU30 contains the 
control circuitry and latches for part of the address and 
data bus. BIU2 contains the latches for the balance of 
the address and data bus. 



NuBus Clock 
Generator 



The NuBus clock generator generates the 10 MHz 
NuBus clock signal and monitors the NuBus control 
signals. 



Power Supply 



The power supply is a self-configuring switching-type 
supply that operates on AC line voltages from and 90 to 
140 VAC and 170 to 270 VAC. The supply outputs +5V, 
+12V, and -12V DC voltages, which are used by the 
logic board, fan, internal disk drives, peripheral ports, 
and NuBus slots. 



Floppy Disk Drives 



Floppy disk drives for the Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx 
are available in two capacities — 800K and 1.4 MB. The 
Macintosh II is shipped to support the 800K drive. An 
upgrade that supports the 1.4 MB drive is available. 
The Macintosh IIx and Macintosh Ilfx are shipped with 
1.4 MB drives and can use either 1.4 MB or 800K 
drives. 






Each internal floppy disk drive connects to the logic 
board through a 20-pin connector.- The flow of data 
between the logic board and the disk drives is 
channeled through the IWM or SWIM disk controller. 
The IWM/SWIM controls reading and writing 
operations. 



SCSI Hard 
Disk Drives 



The Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx can be equipped with a 
single, internal 3.5- or 5.25-inch half-height SCSI hard 
disk drive. For information on SCSI hard disk drives, 
refer to Apple Technical Procedures, "SCSI Hard Disk 
Drives. 11 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .29 



Functional Overview 



The following section describes the operation of the 
power control circuitry and the events that occur 
during system startup. 



Power Control 



The Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx have a hardware- 
on/software-off circuit to control the power supply. 

There are two power switches on the system: one on 
the rear of the Macintosh II (power on and off), and a 
second (power on only) on the Apple Desktop Bus 
keyboard. 

The computer can be powered on by either pressing the 
power switch at the rear of the computer or the switch 
on the Apple Desktop Bus keyboard. 

The computer can be turned off by either selecting Shut 
Down from the Finder TM, s Special menu or by pressing 
the power switch at the rear of the computer. 
Occasionally, severe software crashes can cause both of 
these methods to be inoperative. If the system crashes 
and cannot be powered-off using one of these methods, 
the computer should be unplugged. However, it is 
recommended that the system always be turned off by 
using the Shut Down command. Using Shut Down 
enables the computer to save valuable file and folder 
information before finishing. 

The power supply is designed to protect itself and the 
computer by shutting down if excessive heat, a short 
circuit, or an excessive power drain is experienced. 
After allowing the system to cool down, removing the 
short circuit, or removing some of the load, the system 
can be turned on again. 



System Startup 



An elaborate series of events occurs inside a Macintosh 
II, IIx, or Ilfx when the system is first turned. 
Understanding what happens during this process can be 
useful in quickly pinpointing the source of problems 
that occur during system startup. 






1 .30 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



When the computer is turned on, the system begins a 
carefully synchronized sequence of events. First, the 
processor is held in a wait state while a series of 
circuits puts the system in a known state in preparation 
for operation. During this time, the versatile interface 
adapter and the SWIM chip are initialized, and the 
mapping of RAM and ROM is altered temporarily in 
order to test the system. 

The software contained in the system ROMs then 
performs a RAM test to determine how much RAM is 
present and to verify the proper operation of that RAM. 
Several other system tests are then performed. When 
the system is fully tested and initialized, system RAM 
is mapped for normal operation. 

At this point the disk startup process begins. The 
system looks for a readable disk in the available disk 
drives in the following order: 

1. Internal floppy disk drives — right drive first, 
followed by the left drive 

2. Startup device set in the control panel 

3. SCSI devices — starting with internal drive, then in 
declining order of device ID (6 to 0) 

Note: The startup device will default to the device with 
SCSI address if the lithium batteries are exhausted. 

Once a readable disk containing boot tracks and a 
System Folder are found, the disk is read and the disk 
startup process is completed. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Basics / 1 .31 



□ SYSTEM SOFTWARE 



System Software 
6.0.2 



The Macintosh II and IIx operate using Macintosh 
Operating System version 6.0.2 or later. Installation 
procedures for version 6.0.2 are provided here for 
reference. 



Installation 



Before beginning to install system software, be sure to 
make backup copies of the system software disks and 
use the copies to perform the installation. 



Materials Required 



Macintosh System Software (version 6.0.2 or later) 
System Tools, Printing Tools ; Utilities 1, and Utilities 2 



Procedure 



1. Insert the System Tools disk in any available floppy 
disk drive. 

2. Turn on the computer by pressing the power switch. 

3. When the desktop appears, double-click on the 
System Tools disk to open it. 

4. Double-click on the Setup Folder to open it. 

5. Double-click on the Installer to launch it. 

6. Select the disk you want to install system software 
onto. The name of the currently selected disk 
appears above the buttons on the right side. If it's 
not the disk you want, click Drive until you see the 
name of the disk you want. 

7. Select the type of computer you are installing 
system software on. 

8. Click Install. The installer will place a complete set 
of system software for the computer on the selected 
disk. 

9. When the Installation was successful message 

appears, click Quit. 

10. Choose Restart from the Special menu. The 
computer reboots. 



1 .32 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



System Software 
6.0.5 



Macintosh Ilfx systems require Macintosh Operating 
System version 6.0.5 or later. Systems ordered with 
either the 80- or 160-MB internal SCSI hard disk drive 
factory-installed will have the operating system and 
HyperCard® installed. If replacement of the hard drive 
becomes necessary, you should follow these procedures 
to install the operating system and HyperCard on the 
replacement drive. 



Installation 



Before beginning to install system software, be sure to 
make backup copies of the system software disks and 
use the copies to perform the installation. 



Materials Required 



Macintosh System Software (version 6.0.5 or later) 

System Tools, Printing Tools, Utilities 1, and Utilities 2 
HyperCard software 



Procedure 



1. Insert the System Tools disk in any available floppy 
disk drive. 



2. Turn on the computer by pressing the power switch. 

3. When the desktop appears, double-click on the 
System Tools disk to open it. 

4. Double-click on the Installer to launch it. 

5. When the welcome screen appears, click OK. 

6. Select the disk you want to install system software 
onto. The name of the currently selected disk 
appears next to the disk icon. If it's not the disk 
you want, click Switch Disk until you see the name 
of the disk you want. 

7. Click Install. The installer will place a complete set 
of system software for the computer and printer 
software for all Apple printers on the selected disk. 

8. When the Installation was successful message 
appears, click Quit. 

9. Choose Restart from the Special menu. The 
computer reboots. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .33 



10. When the desktop appears, create a new folder on 
the hard disk. Name the folder HyperCard. 

11. Copy the four HyperCard floppy disks to the hard 
disk. 

System software and HyperCard installation is 
complete. 






□ OTHER INFORMATION 



High-Density 
Media 



The FDHD SuperDrive can read, write, and format 400K 
and 800K disks. However, special high-density, 3.5- 
inch disks that take full advantage of the increased 
capacity of the FDHD SuperDrive are also available. To 
avoid media-related problems when using the FDHD 
SuperDrive disk drive, Apple advises using high- 
density media bearing the Apple label. 



DRIVE AND MEDIA COMPATIBILITY MATRIX 


Drive/Format 


Media 


Single-Sided 


Double-Sided 


High-Density 


400K (GCR) 


R/W/F 


R/W/F (400K 
format only) 


NR 


800K (GCR) 


R/W/F 


R/W/F 


NR 


1 .4 MB (MFM) 


R/W/F 


R/W/F 


R/W/F 


1 .4 MB (MFM) 


X 


R/W (720K Media) 


X 



LEGEND: R = Read 
W = Write 
F = Format 
X = Not Allowed 
N R = Not Recommended 
GC R = Apple Data Format 
MFM= IBM Data Format 



1 .34 / Basics 



Figure 1-11 

Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Figure 1-11. As shown in the drive and media 
compatibility matrix, 400K drives can read, write, and 
format single-sided media and double-sided media (in 
400K format only). The 800K drives can also read, 
write, and format single- and double-sided media. 
However, Apple does not recommend using high-density 
media in either 400K or 800K disk drives. Data saved 
to high-density media using 400K or 800K drives is 
unreliable and could be lost later. The 1.4 MB drives 
can read, write, and format single-sided, double-sided, 
and high-density media. In addition, 1.4 MB drives can 
read and write 720K, double-sided MFM format media 
(MS-DOS and OS/2). 

CAUTION: High-density media are more likely to have 
problems than low-density media. To avoid media- 
related problems, use only known-good media or high- 
density media bearing the Apple label. 

Note: To help understand drive and media format 
compatibility, try thinking in terms of the drive/media 
of lowest capacity. For example, if your system has both 
an 800K drive and an FDHD SuperDrive, to ensure media 
format compatibility between the two drives you must 
use 800K media (the drive and media of lowest capacity). 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Basics / 1 .35 



Programmer's Switch 



Figure 1-12. The programmer's switch can be used to 
reset the computer, place the computer in test monitor 
mode, or generate a nonmaskable interrupt (NMI) to the 
microprocessor for software and hardware development. 






Reset switch - Pressing the reset switch resets the 
microprocessor and reboots the computer. Doing so 
causes any information in system RAM to be lost. 

Interrupt switch - Pressing the interrupt switch 
generates a nonmaskable interrupt. If the interrupt 
switch is pressed while the computer is booting, the 
self-test monitor will be entered. The self-test 
monitor is a program in system ROM that allows 
another computer to communicate directly with the 
Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx hardware to run 
diagnostics. 



Programmer's Switch 




Reset interrupt 



Figure 1-12 



1 .36 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Materials Required 
to Service the 
Macintosh Il/IIx/Ilfx 



A minimum of tools are required to maintain and repair 
the Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx. 

• #2 Phillips screwdriver 

• Flat-blade screwdriver 

• Grounded workstation pad 

• Grounding wriststrap 

• MacTest™ and AppleCAT® II/IIx 

(Macintosh II and IIx) 

• MacTest Ilfx (Macintosh Ilfx) 

Certain procedures require other items such as 
software or manuals. These items will be indicated 
where required. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .37 



□ SPECIFICATIONS 








Macintosh n 


Macintosh Hx 


Macintosh nfx 


Processor 








Type 


MC68020 


MC68030 


MC68030 


Addressing 


32-bit registers 
32-bit address bus 
32-bit data bus 


32-bit registers 
32-bit address bus 
32-bit data bus 


32-bit registers 
32-bit address bus 
32-bit data bus 


Clock Rate 


15.6772 MHz 


15.6772 MHz 


40 MHz 


Memory 








RAM 


1 MB standard 
Four 256K SIMMs; 
expandable to 
8 MB 


1 MB standard 
Four 256K SIMMs; 
expandable to 
8 MB 


4 MB standard 
Four 1 MB SIMMs; 
expandable to 
8 MB 



I 



I/O Interfaces 



256-byte parameter 256-byte parameter 256-byte parameter 
RAM RAM RAM 

32K RAM cache 
Four 8K x 8-bit 
static RAMs 



ROM 



256K 

Four 512K x 8-bit 

DIP devices 



256K 

Four 512K x 8-bit 
SOJ devices on a 
ROM SIMM 



256K 

Four 512K x 8-bit 
SOJ devices on a 
ROM SIMM 



Floppy 
Disk Interface 



Apple IWM chip 
GCR modes 



Apple SWIM chip 
MFM/GCR modes 
Support 800K and 
1.4 MB drives 



Apple SWIM chip 
MFM/GCR modes 
Support 800K and 
1.4 MB drives 



Expansion 
Interface 



120-pin processor 
direct slot 



SCSI Interface 



7.5 MB/second 
transfer rate 



7.5 MB/second 
transfer rate 



3 MB/second 
transfer rate 






1 .38 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






SCSI Interface 
(continued) 

Apple Desktop 
Bus 

Serial Interfaces 



Stereo Audio 



Supports a maximum of 8 devices (The computer is always 
device 7. Optional internal SCSI hard disk drive is device 0.) 

Low-speed, synchronous serial interface 



Two RS-232/RS-422 

230.4K baud maximum 

0.920 Mbit/second if external clock source is provided (modem 

interface only) 

Asynchronous, synchronous (modem only), and AppleTalk 

(printer only) protocols supported 

Stereo compatible 

Output impedance of 8 to 600 ohms 

Short-circuit protected 

Disables internal speaker when in use 

4-voice wave-table synthesis and stereo sampling generator 



Floppy Disk Drive 

800K Disk Drive 



FDHD SuperDrive 



512 bytes per sector 
9 sectors per track 
368.64K/side 
737.28K/disk 

512 bytes per sector 
18 sectors per track 
737.28K/side 
l474.56K/disk 



Electrical 

Line voltage 

Line Frequency 

Power 

Altitude 



90 to 140 VAC and 170 to 270 VAC, self-configuring power 
supply 

48 to 62 Hz 

230 watts (maximum), not including monitor 

to 10,000 feet 



Macintosh II/IIx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Basics / 1 .39 



Environmental 




Operating 
Temperature 


10° C to 35° C 
50° F to 95° F 


Storage 
Temperature 


-40° C to 47° C 
-40° F to 116.6° F 


Relative 
Humidity 


5% to 95% noncor 


Altitude 


to 10,000 feet 
to 3048 m 


Physical 




Dimensions 


Width 

Height 

Depth 



18.66 in (474 mm) 
5.51 in (140 mm) 
14.37 in (365 mm) 



Weight 



24 to 26 lbs. (10.9 to 11.8 kg) 

Weight varies depending on configuration of RAM, floppy 
drives, and hard drives. Does not include any NuBus 
expansion cards. 



1 .40 / Basics 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/IIfx 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 

Section 2 - Take-Apart 



□ CONTENTS 








2.3 


Top Cover 




2.5 


Power Supply 




2.7 


Floppy Disk Drives 




2.9 


SCSI Hard Disk Drive 




2.11 


Identifying 20SC Revision A and B Drives 




2.13 


Drive Mount 




2.15 


SIMMs 




2.19 


Logic Board 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx rev. Oct 90 Take-Apart / 2.1 




Figure 2-1 



2.2 / Take- Apart 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



□ TOP COVER 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
#2 Phillips screwdriver 



Remove 



1. Turn off the computer, and disconnect all cables 
except the power cord from the rear of the 
computer. 

2. Figure 2-1A. Remove the Phillips screw located at 
the center-rear of the top cover. 

3. Figure 2-1 A. Locate the two tabs at the rear of the 
computer that secure the top cover to the case, one 
on each side. 



4. Figure 2-1B. Simultaneously push the tabs in with 
your index fingers and lift the top cover, back first, 
from the computer. No force is necessary. (Do not 
push down on the top of the computer with your 
thumbs.) 

CAUTION: Do not rotate the rear of the top cover 
more than 45 degrees. Rotating the cover more than 
45 degrees will cause damage to the floppy disk 
drives. 



Replace 



1. Figure 2-1C. Position the top cover on the case, 
front first. Be sure to align the three notches on 
the front of the cover with the three tabs on the 
case. 



CAUTION: Sheet metal tabs on the inside of the top 
cover can be bent out of place easily and can damage 
the floppy disk drives. Before replacing the top cover, 
make sure none of the sheet metal tabs are bent 
inward, toward the center of the cover. 

2. Lower the top cover until the rear tabs snap into 
position. 



3. Replace the top cover screw. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Take-Apart / 2.3 



Power 

Supply 

Cable 




B 




Phillips Screw 



# 





]00f 



uuuuuuu Px 



III I I I II II II II II II I 



® 



Q \ZD C=J 



I 



Figure 2-2 






2.4 / Take-Apart 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






□ POWER SUPPLY 



Materials Required 



Grounded workstation pad and wriststrap 
#2 Phillips screwdriver 
Small, flat-blade screwdriver 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 

2. Verify that the power is off and disconnect the 
power cord. 

3. Figure 2-2A. Disconnect the power supply cable 
from the logic board. If necessary, use a small flat- 
blade screwdriver to pry the cable loose. 

4. Figure 2-2B. Remove the Phillips screw that holds 
the power supply in place. 

5. Figure 2-2C, Slide the power supply toward the 
front of the case, and lift the power supply, front 
first, from the case. 



Replace 



1. Lower the power supply into the case, so that the 
AC connectors align with the holes in the back 
panel. Press down and slide the power supply 
toward the back panel until the screw tab on the 
power supply aligns with the screw hole on the 
case. 

2. Replace the Phillips screw that holds the power 
supply in place. 

3. Connect the power supply cable to the logic board. 

4. Repine the top cov^r. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Take-Apart / 2.5 



rK 




Drive 2 Drive 1 



B 



E" 



o 




III II 111! II II II !□ 



Floppy Drive Cables 




Screws 



j\. 





i 



2.6 / Take-Apart 



Figure 2-3 

Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



□ FLOPPY DISK DRIVES 



The Macintosh II, IIx, and life can have two internal 
floppy disk drives. Drive 1 is located on the right side 
of the drive mount; its cable is connected to the right 20- 
pin connector (farthest from the power supply). Drive 2 
is located on the left side of the drive mount; its cable is 
connected to the left 20-pin connector (nearest the power 
supply). The disk drives and cables are shown in Figure 
2-3A. The procedure for removing the internal floppy 
disk drives, whether 800K or 1.4 MB, is the same. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
#2 Phillips screwdriver 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 



2. Figure 2-3B. Disconnect the cable from the floppy 
disk drive to be removed. 

3. Figure 2-3C. Remove the screw holding the drive to 
be removed. 

4. Figure 2-3D. Lift the rear of the drive, slide it 
back, and lift it off the drive mount. 



Replace 



1. Figure 2-3E. Position the front of the drive so that 
the two tabs on the drive case slide into the two 
holes on the drive mount. Lower the drive into 
position, making sure that the screw holes line up. 






2. Replace the screw that holds the drive in place. 

3. Connect the cable to the drive. 

4. Replace the top cover . 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Take-Apart / 2.7 



SCSI Cable 



SCSI Power Cable 




B 



yv 




Screws 





A 



Floppy Drive Cable 




Phillips Screws 



£ 



£l 



SCSI Cable 




ana , — ■ a 



u I 1 u II* 

■° osnoQjLpo 



D D D 

oco a 
Do D D 



III II II II II II II II II ll II II II I III I 111 



Figure 2-4 



2.8 / Take-Apart 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



G SCSI HARD DISK DRIVE 



The Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx can be configured with 
either a 3.5- or 5.25-inch half-height SCSI hard disk 
drive. The procedure for removing all Apple internal 
SCSI drives is the same. 

Apple currently ships two versions of the internal Hard 
Disk 20SC. To the customer, the Hard Disk 20SC 
Revision A drive and the Hard Disk 20SC Revision B 
drive are identical, but these drives must be replaced 
like-for-like. To differentiate between the drives, 
refer to "Identifying 20SC Revision A and B Drives." 
For part numbers, refer to Illustrated Parts List or your 
Apple Service Programs binder. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
#2 Phillips screwdriver 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 



2. Figure 2-4A. Disconnect the power and SCSI cables 
from the hard disk drive. 



3. 



Note: If the computer is a Macintosh Ilfx, be sure to 
also remove the SCSI filter, if present. 

Figure 2-4B. Remove the two Phillips screws 
holding the hard disk in position. 



4. Figure 2-4C. Lift the hard disk from the side with 
the cable connectors, slide it toward the power 
supply, and lift it off the drive mount. 

5. To remove the SCSI cable: 

a) Figure 2-4D. Disconnect the floppy drives. 

b) Figure 2-4E. Remove the four drive mount 
screws and lift out the drive mount. 

c) Figure 2-4F. Press outward on the two ejector 
tabs on the SCSI connector (located on the main 
logic board) and unplug the cable. 

Note: The frame supplied with the replacement hard 
disk drive must be installed on the defective drive 
before returning the defective drive to Apple. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Oct 90 



Take- Apart / 2.9 



Component- 
Side Up 



Solder- 
Side Up 




Revision A 




Revision B 




Figure 2-5 



2.10 /Take-Apart 



rev. Oct 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Identifying 20SC 
Revision A and B Drives 



Revision A and Revision B Hard Disk 20SC drives 
must be replaced like-for-like. To differentiate 
between drive versions, check their circuit boards with 
the drive installed in an internal frame. For Revision A 
drives (Figure 2-5A) the component side of the board is 
up; for Revision B boards the solder side is up. 



Replace 



1. If the SCSI cable was removed (step 5), connect the 
SCSI cable to the SCSI connector on the main logic 
board, replace the drive mount and its four Phillips 
screws, and reconnect the floppy drives. 

2. Figure 2-5B. Position the front of the hard disk so 
that the two tabs on the hard disk case slide into 
the two holes on the drive mount. Lower the hard 
disk into position. 

3. Replace the two hard disk screws. 

4. Connect the SCSI and power cables to the hard disk. 

Note: If the computer is a Macintosh Ilfx, a SCSI 
filter may need to be installed. Refer to Section 5, 
Additional Procedures, "Macintosh Ilfx — SCSI 
Termination" for information. 

5. Replace the top cover . 






Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Oct 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.11 




a r* 



Floppy Drive Cables 



SCSI Cable SCSI Power Cable 




;\ 




Phillips Screws 




J V 






Figure 2-6 






2.12 /Take-Apart 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






□ DRIVE MOUNT 



The drive mount is a metal frame that has the floppy and 
hard disk drives installed on it. The drive mount is 
then installed into the case. 

The drives in the computer will vary depending on the 
customer's configuration. Disregard the instructions 
that do not apply to the system you are working on. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
#2 Phillips screwdriver 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 

2. Figure 2-6A. Disconnect the cables from floppy disk 
drive 1 and drive 2 (if installed). 

3. Figure 2-6B. Disconnect the power and SCSI cables 
from the SCSI hard disk, if installed. 

4. Figure 2-6C. Remove the four Phillips screws that 
hold the drive mount in position. 

5. Figure 2-6D. Remove the drive mount. 



Replace 



1. Position the drive mount so that the screw holes 
line up with the holes on the support posts. 

2. Replace the four Phillips screws that hold the drive 
mount in place. 

3. Connect the power and SCSI cables to the hard disk. 

4. Connect the cables to floppy disk drive 1 and drive 
2 (if installed). 

5. Replace the top cover . 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.13 



;.' 



; a uuut ^\ 



LJrDfflHJDffiRIBflHHRLJ - 



■0-"! 

mm m & | QQ fg 




llllillltilll 111 



LJHJHWHSOMflHHUiLr" 



T^ 







^BankA 



^BankB 



^ Bank A 



^BankB 




Bank A 



BankB 



2.14 /Take-Apart 



Figure 2-7 

Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



G SIMMS 



RAM memory in the Macintosh II, IIx ? and Ilfx is 
packaged in Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs). 
SIMMs for the Macintosh II and IIx can be either 25 6K 
or 1 megabyte and must be 120 nanoseconds or faster. 
For the Macintosh Ilfx, only 1 megabyte SIMMs with a 
speed of 80 nanoseconds or faster (nonparity systems) 
or 60 nanoseconds or faster (parity systems) can be 
used. 

The Macintosh II logic board is shown in Figure 2-7A; 
the Macintosh IIx logic board in Figure 2-7B; the 
Macintosh Ilfx logic board in Figure 2-7C. 

Two banks of SIMM sockets are located on each of the 
logic boards. For all logic boards, the banks are labeled 
Bank A and Bank B. Each bank contains four slots. 
When installing SIMMs, use either Bank A alone, or 
Bank A and Bank B. Fill all four slots of each bank with 
like-sized SIMMs. The following chart illustrates the 
configurations each computer supports. 





Macintosh n and Etx 


Macintosh nfx 


RAM 


Bank A 


BankB 


Bank A 


BankB 


1 MB 


Four 256K 


Empty 


NA 


NA 


2 MB 


Four 256K 


Four 256K 


NA 


NA 


4 MB 


Four 1 MB 


Empty 


Four 1 MB 


Empty 


5 MB 


Four 1 MB 


Four 256K 


NA 


NA 


8 MB 


Four 1 MB 


Four 1 MB 


Four 1 MB 


Four 1 MB 



For additional information on RAM identification and 
upgrades, refer to Section 5, Additional Procedures. 






Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.15 




s 



J 




Figure 2-8 






2.16 /Take-Apart 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Materials Required 



Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 
SIMM removal tool 

CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to damage from 
ESP and skin acid Handle only by the edges! 



Remove 



1. Place the computer on the grounded workbench pad 
and put on your grounding wriststrap. 

2. Remove the top cover and drive mount . 

3. Figures 2-8A and 2-8B. To remove a SIMM you must 
release the plastic tabs on the ends of the socket. 
The correct tool for doing this is the SIMM removal 
tool. For instructions see You Oughta Know in 
Apple Service Technical Procedures, Cross Family 
Peripherals. 



Replace 



1. With the contacts on the SIMM pointing down, set 
the SIMM into the connector at an angle. Push back 
on the top corners of the SIMM. You will hear a 
click when the SIMM snaps into place. 

2. Replace the drive mount and top cover . 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.17 



B 



SCSI Power Cable SCSI Cable 



5" 



]<> 




ana 



C D D D 



gponjgo 

9 



jiii i ii n it n i n ii n ii ii i i gnznp] 



Floppy Drive Cables 



Speaker Cable 



gr 



]° 



Dl 




od_<M "- Q DDDDD B 



DD a 



aaa 

= D 
D 



-CD- -CZ> 



D D D I 




Q°D(]0£pQ 



B 



MM I 1 1/ I I II I I I I II II II II II II Ml I I i n 




Programmer's 
Switch 



Power Supply Cable 




Screws 



Tabs 



i 



Figure 2-9 






2.18 /Take-Apart 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



□ LOGIC BOARD 



Macintosh II and IIx computers each come with various 
revisions of main logic boards that vary slightly in 
appearance but have no functional differences and can be 
used interchangeably. Be sure to remove any SIMMs 
installed on the old logic board for installation on the 
new logic board. Refer to Section 5, Troubleshooting, for 
further module exchange information. 

CAUTION: The logic board contains components that are 
very susceptible to ESD damage. Handle the board only 
by its edges, and follow the precautions outlined for ESD 
prevention in You Oughta Know. 



Materials Required 



#2 Phillips screwdriver 

Grounded workbench pad and wriststrap 

Small, flat-blade screwdriver 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover and drive mount . 



2. Figure 2-9A. Disconnect the floppy drive cables, the 
SCSI hard drive cables, and the speaker cable from 
the logic board. 

3. Figure 2-9B. Disconnect the power supply cable 
from the logic board. Use the flat-blade 
screwdriver, if necessary. 

4. Figure 2-9B. Remove the programmer's switch, if 
installed. 

5. Figure 2-9C Remove the two screws that hold the 
logic board in place. 

6. Figure 2-9C. Starting at the front of the logic board, 
gently lift up the board as you push each of the nine 
tabs in, one at a time. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.19 



B 



£ 




hTEa 




-.o'onooo SB 
go 

an „ 
no a 
no a 

o u» 




osnnOB 






Dun D 



11 1 1 II II II II II II 11 II II II ll r 11 I TTn 



RFI 

Shield 



llP ) UUUU| 



-P\ Power 

Switch 



D o n p 




Figure 2-10 



Knob 






2.20 / Take-Apart 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



7. Figure 2-10A. Slide the logic board toward you and 
lift it from the case. 

8. Figure 2-1 OB. Remove the power switch knob and 
RFI shield. 



Replace 



1. Replace the power switch knob and EMI shield. 

2. Position the logic board so that the port connectors 
line up with the rear of the case. Gently lower the 
board into the case and press the board onto the tabs. 

3. Replace the two logic board screws. 

4. Connect the floppy drive cables, power supply cable, 
SCSI hard drive cables, and speaker cable to the logic 
board. 

Note: If the computer is a Macintosh life, a SCSI 
filter and/or terminator may need to be installed. 
Refer to Section 5, Additional Procedures, 
"Macintosh Ilfx — SCSI Termination" for information. 

5. Replace the programmer's switch, if removed. 

6. Replace the drive mount and top cover . 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. May 90 



Take-Apart / 2.21 



ft Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 

Section 3 - Diagnostics 



□ CONTENTS 








3.3 


Introduction to MacTest II/IIx 




3.4 


Copying Mactest II/IIx Disk 




3.4 


Using Your Backup Disk 




3.5 


Running MacTest II/IIx 




3.5 


Materials Required 




3.5 


Starting MacTest II/IIx 




3.7 


Installing the Loopbacks 




3.7 


Using the MacTest II/IIx Menus 




3.12 


Running the Tests 




3.14 


Diagnostic Sound Sampler 




3.14 


Introduction 




3.14 


Materials Required 




3.14 


Procedure 




3.15 


Introduction to AppleCAT II/IIx 




3.16 


Running AppleCAT II/IIx 




3.16 


Materials Required 




3.16 


Setting Up Test Station and UUT 




3.19 


Establishing Communication 




3.20 


Using the AppleCAT II/IIx Menus 




3.23 


Running the Tests 




3.25 


Repair Confirmation Code (RCC) 




3.26 


SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure 




3.26 


To Determine If a Jumper Is Needed 




3.27 


To Install the Jumper 



Note: These procedures cover the operation of MacTest 
n/Hx only. Refer to the MacTest MP section of the 
Mac Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab in Volume II of 
the Macintosh Family Technical Procedures for 
instructions on using MacTest MP on the Macintosh 

nfx 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Apr 91 



Diagnostics/ 3.1 






□ INTRODUCTION TO MACTEST ll/IIX 






The MacTest™ II/IIx diagnostic disk (version 3.0 or 
higher) is part of the AppleCAT® II/IIx diagnostic set, 
but may also be used as a standalone functional test of 
your Macintosh II or Macintosh IIx system. The MacTest 
II/IIx disk includes the MacTest II/IIx program and the 
Diagnostic Sound Sampler. The Diagnostic Sound 
Sampler lets you listen to the various musical chord 
sequences that are generated during a power-on failure. 

MacTest II/IIx is a pass/fail functional test. As the test 
progresses, messages on the screen indicate the tests 
being performed and the test results. As soon as a 
failure is detected, the test stops and the screen 
indicates which module must be replaced before the test 
can be completed. MacTest then terminates and returns 
to the Finder (desktop). 



The MacTest II/IIx program identifies the ROM version 
of the system and tests the 



Main logic board 

Internal disk drives 

Video interface card 

SCSI bus 

HMMU/PMMU (Macintosh II only) 

Apple PC 5.25 Drive and Macintosh II PC Card 

Apple EtherTalk™ Card 



MacTest II/IIx also provides test patterns for use in 
adjusting the high-resolution monitors. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics / 3.3 



MacTest II/IIx does not test the internal SCSI hard disk. 

To test the hard disk, use the Macintosh Hard Disk 
Drive Diagnostic disk (see Section 3, Diagnostics, in 
the SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical Procedures). 

MacTest II/IIx tests an internal expansion slot only 
when an Apple expansion card is installed. To test an 
expansion slot, install an EtherTalk Card or a Macintosh 
II PC Card (with an Apple PC 5.25 Drive) in the slot 
and select the appropriate test from the Test Selections 
window. 



Copying 
MacTest II/IIx 
Disk 



Use Finder to make a backup disk before you begin! When 

testing a defective Macintosh II or Macintosh IIx, it is 
possible to damage or erase a section of the MacTest II/IIx 
disk. 



Using Your 

Backup 

Disk 



Take the following precautions when using your 
MacTest II/IIx disk copy: 

• Do not write-protect your working copy of the 
MacTest II/IIx disk. The program will not run 
correctly if you do. 

• Do not change the name of the diagnostic program 
on the disk. During logic board testing, the machine 
reboots, looks for, and restarts the diagnostic named 
MacTest II/IIx. If the name has been changed, the 
startup routine will not be able to locate it, and the 
system will stay on the desktop. 

Therefore, if the MacTest II/IIx window does not 
reappear after a logic board test, check the name of 
the diagnostic icon on the desktop. Correct it to 
MacTest II/IIx, then select Set Startup from the 
desktop Special menu. When you are asked if you 
wish to change the name of the startup application 
to MacTest II/IIx, click OK. Then double-click on 
the corrected MacTest II/IIx icon to return to the 
test program. 



3.4 / Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






□ RUNNING MACTEST ll/IIX 



Materials Required 



MacTest II/IIx diagnostic disk (backup) 

Mini-DIN-8-to-mini-DIN-8 serial port cable 

SCSI loopback test card (modified with jumper — see 

"SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure") 
Blank, 800K disk for drive test 
Blank, 1.4 MB disk for high-density drive test 



Starting 
MacTest ll/llx 



You can use MacTest II/IIx to perform a functional test 
of the entire Macintosh II or Macintosh IIx system, or 
you can use it to test a single component in a known- 
good system. Follow the start-up steps below for the 
testing you wish to perform. 



Testing 

Complete System 
or Logic Board 



1. If you are testing a complete Macintosh II or 
Macintosh IIx system, or if you intend to run the 
logic tests, turn the power off and remove all 
expansion cards except the Macintosh II Video Card. 

2. Install the loopback connectors as described under 
"Installing the Loopbacks," later in this section. 

3. Insert the MacTest II/IIx disk into the right internal 
drive, and power on the system. MacTest II/IIx will 
display the MacTest II/IIx Status, or Start, window. 
From the Status window you can click on Start to 
run the tests. 



Testing 

Single 

Component 



1. If you are testing a single component in a known- 
good system, insert the MacTest II/IIx disk into 
the right internal drive, and power on the system. 



2. MacTest II/IIx will display a window that tells you 
to turn off the power and connect the SCSI loopback 
board. Click OK to get to the MacTest II/IIx Status, 
or Start, window. 

3. From the Status window you can use the MacTest 
II/IIx menus. Go to the Options menu and use the 
Test Selections submenu to select the tests you want 
to run. Then click on Start. For more specific 
information on the tests, see "Using the MacTest 
II/IIx Menus" and "Running the Tests," later in this 
section. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics / 3.5 



Helpful Startup 
Information 



If any of the following problems are encountered, 
refer to Section 4, Troubleshooting, for additional 
information. 



i 



2. 



• The known-good MacTest II/IIx disk will not 
boot. 

• The Configuration window indicates there is no 
interface card installed in any slot, and there is. 

• The Configuration window indicates there are no 
disk drives installed, and there are. 

• The Macintosh II/Macintosh IIx system 
intermittently locks up during the logic test. 

• The Configuration window indicates the wrong 
amount of RAM installed. 

If you do not know whether the system you are 
testing is good: 

a) Run the MacTest II/IIx logic, drive, and video card 
tests. (See "Using the MacTest II/IIx Menus" and 
"Running the Tests," later in this section.) Complete 
any needed repairs before you continue. 

b) If you removed a Macintosh II PC Card, run the 
Apple PC 5.25 Drive test as described in Section 3, 
Diagnostics, of the Apple PC 5.25 Drive Technical 
Procedures. 

c) If you removed an EtherTalk Interface Card, run 
the EtherTalk Interface Card test as described in 
Section 2, Diagnostics, of the EtherTalk Interface 
Card Technical Procedures. 

d) If you removed any non- Apple expansion cards, 
install them one at a time, and run the MacTest 
II/IIx logic, drive, and monitor tests after each 
card is installed. Repeat the install-and-test 
process until all expansion cards are installed and 
the Macintosh II/Macintosh IIx passes all tests. 



3.6 / Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Installing the 
Loopbacks 



Before beginning MacTest II/IIx, and with the power off, 

connect the serial loopback cable, the SCSI loopback 
card, the keyboard, the mouse, the video interface card, 
and the monitor. 



CAUTION: Always power off the system when you 
connect or disconnect the SCSI loopback card. 

The SCSI loopback card cable (Figure 3-1, #1) must be 
connected to the SCSI port (Figure 3-1, #2) on the back 
of the Macintosh II/Macintosh IIx. (No other 
connections between the card and the Macintosh 
II/Macintosh IIx are necessary.) To protect the SCSI 
circuitry, you must have the power off when you connect 
the SCSI card. The loopback cable (Figure 3-1, #3) with 
the mini DIN-8 connectors must be installed between 
the modem and printer ports (Figure 3-1, # 4) on the rear 
of the machine. 




Figure 3-1 



Using the 
MacTest ll/llx 
Menus 



Before you start MacTest II/IIx, you may use the 
MacTest II/IIx menus to select the tests you want to 
run or to select other features of the diagnostic. You 
cannot use the menus when the tests are running. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics / 3.7 



Options Menu 



The Options menu contains the Test Selections and 
Configuration submenus. 

1. Test Selections: The following window (Figure 3-2) 
appears when Test Selections is chosen: 



Test Selections 


£3 Logic test 
® Short CHong 

□ MC68851 PMMU 

□ Keyboard 

□ Mouse 
Disk Driues: 


□ Uideo Card in slot [T] 
D Uideo monitor 

D Apple* PC 5.25 Bi1i»e Cr Care! 
D*lheiTalk™ Interface Card 

□ Ttt>a-card EtherTnlk cammunicaMon X*$i 


□ Left El Right 
O BOOK O 800K 

OK4M OL4M 




D Loop on selected tests 




| OK | [ Cancel ] 



Figure 3-2 

Test Selections allows you to select the tests you wish to 
run, and identifies the slot number in which each 
expansion card is installed. If an EtherTalk Card or a 
Macintosh II PC Card is not installed in an expansion 
slot, the selection for that test will be dimmed. 

To select a test, click in the box next to the name of 
the item to be tested. The box will display an X. To 
deselect the test, click again in the box to remove the 
X. When you have selected all the tests you wish, click 
in the OK box. You will be returned to the MacTest 
II/IIx Status window. 



3.8 / Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Test Selections includes the following tests: 

a) Logic: This test will verify the correct 

functioning of the following circuitry on the 
logic board: 



VIA (Versatile Interface Adaptor) 

FPU (Floating Point Unit) 

Serial ports 

Clock 

SCSI bus 

RAM 



You may select a short or long logic test. The running 
time of the test will vary depending on how much 
memory is installed. At the beginning of the RAM test, 
MacTest II/IIx will indicate the maximum running time 
of the test. 

b) MC68851 PMMU: This selection tests the 
circuitry and basic functions of the Paged 
Memory Management Unit on the main logic 
board of the Macintosh II only. 

c) Keyboard: This selection activates the keyboard 
self-tests that verify the functioning of the 
keyboard. 

d) Mouse: This selection activates the mouse self- 
tests that verify the functioning of the mouse. 

e) Disk Drives: This test verifies the proper 
functioning of the right and left disk drives, or 
whichever drive (right or left) is present. It 
also tests both 800K and 1.4 MB disk drives. 

Video Card in slot: This selection tests a 

Macintosh II Video Card installed in one of the 
expansion slots on the Macintosh II or Macintosh 
IIx. If more than one video card is installed, you 
must tell MacTest II/IIx which video card to test. 
Enter the slot number of the video card you 
want to test in the box after Video Card in slot. 
Use the keyboard to type in the correct slot 
number, or use the space bar to space to the 
correct slot number. 



Macintosh I l/l Ix/llfe 



May 90 



Diagnostics / 3.9 



g) Video monitor: This selection displays test 

patterns that are used to adjust the video picture 
on the high-resolution monitors. Video monitor 
displays test patterns on the main (default) 
monitor only. If you are adjusting a second 
monitor, select Monitors in the Control Panel, 
drag the menu bar at the top of the monitor icon 
into the icon of the second monitor, and reboot. 

Note: Refer to Apple High-Res Monochrome 
Monitor Technical Procedures or Apple High -Res 
RGB Monitor Technical Procedures for 
information about any necessary adjustments. 

h) EtherTalk Interface Card: This selection tests 
the EtherTalk Interface Card and the expansion 
slot. To set up for this test, follow the 
instructions in Section 2, Diagnostics, of the 
EtherTalk Interface Card Technical Procedures. 

i) Two-card EtherTalk communication test: This 
selection tests the communication between a 
known-good EtherTalk card and a suspect 
EtherTalk card. To set up for this test, follow 
the instructions in Section 2, Diagnostics, of the 
EtherTalk Interface Card Technical Procedures. 

j) Apple PC 5.25 Drive and Card: This test verifies 
the correct functioning of the drive, the 
Macintosh II PC Card, and the expansion slot. To 
set up for this test, follow the instructions in 
Section 3, Diagnostics, of the Apple PC 5.25 
Drive Technical Procedures. 

Note: The Apple PC 5.25 Drive test cannot 
always determine which module caused a test to 
fail. If the test reports that the drive and/or 
card is bad, replace one module at a time as 
described in Section 4, Troubleshooting, of the 
Apple PC 5.25 Drive Technical Procedures. 

k) Loop on all tests: This selection provides 

continuous running (in sequence) of all selected 
tests except the Video monitor. To stop the 
looping, click the Stop box between tests (when 
the screen displays an arrow and not a wristwatch). 



Note: You cannot loop on both the logic board 
and drive tests at the same time. 



3.10 / Diagnostics May 90 Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Configuration: The following window (Figure 3-3) 
will appear when Configuration is selected. 



MncTftst™ II/Mhi;3.0 



Macintosh I Ik 
Memory Size 1 MB 

ROM Uersion Rev 1.3 

MC68851 PMMU Not applicable 
Slot 1: Macintosh II Uideo Card 
Slot 2: This card is not recognized 
Slot 3: No card detected 
Slot 4: No card detected 
Slot 5: No card detected 
Slot 6: No card detected 

Left driue: 1.4 MB 
Right driue: 1.4 MB 



UK 



Figure 3-3 






This window displays the amount of memory, the 
version number of the ROMs, the cards installed in 
expansion slots 1 through 6 of the Macintosh II or 
Macintosh IIx, and the current disk drive configuration. 



File Menu 



The File menu displays the following items. Open, 
Close, and Stop are dimmed. 



•Open... 

• Close 

• Save Test Selections 
•Stop 

•Quit 



[Command-O] 
(Dimmed unless a desk 
accessory is open) 
[Command-S] 
[Command-.] 
[Command-Q] 



1. Save Test Selections: Allows you to customize your 
MacTest II/IIx disk by saving your selection of tests 
for the next time you use MacTest II/IIx. 

2. Stop: Select Stop to end the diagnostic and return 
to the MacTest II/IIx Status window. 

3. Quit: Returns you to the desktop. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.11 



Apple Menu 



The Apple (#) menu contains the following three 
selections: 



i 



1. About MacTest D/IIx: When selected, a dialog box 
displays the diagnostic name, version number, date 
of release, and a copy-protect statement. 

2. Control Panel: This option allows you to set 
preferences for speaker volume, monitor status, 
desktop pattern, or mouse tracking. 

3. Key Caps: When selected, Key Caps displays a 
window with a keyboard. Press each key on the 
keyboard and verify that the display block for the 
key is highlighted. If the key is not highlighted, 
the keyswitch is bad and should be replaced. If 
numerous keys are not highlighted, exchange the 
keyboard. 



Running 
the Tests 



After selecting the tests you wish to run using 
Test Selections, you are ready to start MacTest II/IIx. 
Click on the Start box in the MacTest II/IIx Status 
window. Please note the following: 

• The Status line at the bottom of the MacTest II/IIx 
window will keep you informed of the tests being 
performed and the test results. 

• While running, all tests display a wristwatch. There 
is no other moving or flashing indicator that tells 
you the test is in progress. 

• If the SCSI loopback card is missing or improperly 
installed, you will be instructed at once to turn off 
the power, disconnect all external SCSI drives, and 
connect the SCSI loopback card. 

• If the serial loopback cable is missing or improperly 
installed, the testing will begin, but the serial ports 
test will fail. You will be instructed to make sure 
the serial loopback cable is connected, then to click 
on Continue to retry the failed test. (You can 
connect the serial loopback cable without powering 
off the system.) 



3.12 /Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






When testing the disk drives, you will be prompted 
to insert and remove blank 800K and high-density 
disks. Perform the disk swaps as directed on the 
screen, and then click on OK. 



Note: It is important to insert the requested low- or 
high-density disk. If the wrong disk is inserted, 
MacTest II/IIx will indicate that the disk drive is 
malfunctioning when it may not be. 

CA UTION: Do not press the reset or interrupt switch 
while the RAM test is running. Pushing reset causes the 
RAM test to fail, and pressing interrupt may damage the 
MacTest ll/llx disk. 

• You may halt the testing by clicking on Stop or 
Pause any time between tests: 

- Choose Stop to halt the testing and to return to 
the MacTest II/IIx Status window. Choose Start 
when you wish to begin the testing sequence 
again. 






Choose Pause if you wish to discontinue testing 
temporarily. Choose Continue to resume the 
tests from the point of interruption. 



Replace any module that the test indicates is faulty (see 
Section 2, Take-Apart). Before replacing the module, 
use AppleCAT II/IIx or refer to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, to verify the diagnosis. If the system 
is still not operating properly, turn to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, for more information. 

If all tests pass, the Macintosh II/Macintosh IIx will 
return to the MacTest II/IIx Status window. The 
message All selected tests have passed will be 
displayed on the Status line. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.13 



□ DIAGNOSTIC SOUND SAMPLER 



Introduction 



i 



The Diagnostic Sound Sampler enables you to listen 
and become familiar with the Macintosh II and 
Macintosh IIx error chords. Error chords are brief, 
musical tones that indicate whether the system is 
functioning correctly or if there is a hardware problem. 



Refer to Section 4, Troubleshooting, for complete 
information on startup and error chords. 



Materials Required 



Known-good Macintosh II or Macintosh IIx system 
MacTest II/IIx disk (backup) 



Procedure 



1. Set up the Macintosh II/Macintosh IIx system. 



2. Insert the MacTest II/IIx backup disk. A window 
will appear telling you to connect a SCSI loopback 
card. 

3. Click OK. The desktop will appear. 

4. Open the Diagnostic Sound Sampler. A window 
listing the various chords and chord sequences will 
be displayed. Select the ones you wish to hear. 

5. On completion, click Quit. 



3.14/ Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



□ INTRODUCTION TO APPLECAT ll/IIX 



AppleCAT II/IIx is a diagnostic tool that uses a known- 
good Macintosh to diagnose module failures in a 
defective Macintosh II or Macintosh IIx. The known- 
good Macintosh (test station) and defective Macintosh 
II/IIx (unit under test, or UUT) are connected through 
their communication ports. The test station performs 
the following functions: 



Establishes communications with the UUT 

Calls tests in the UUT ROM 

Downloads tests to the faulty machine 

Calls tests for MacTest in the UUT disk drive 

Displays test results on the test station screen 

Identifies the failing module 

Prompts the technician for information 

Recommends a repair procedure 

Issues a repair confirmation code (RCC) 



With AppleCAT II/IIx, the machine being tested does 
not have to be fully operational. By using an 
independent, working computer to do the diagnosis, 
AppleCAT II/IIx depends very little on the unit under 
test (UUT), and is more reliable and thorough than 
traditional diagnostic methods. 

Standard windows guide the technician through each 
stage of the diagnostic. When the UUT fails a test or 
indicates a problem, an AppleCAT II/IIx screen will ask 
for more information or recommend a repair. 

After each module replacement or adjustment, AppleCAT 
II/IIx reruns the failed test to verify that the problem 
has been fixed. If the UUT successfully completes a 
final system verification, AppleCAT II/IIx issues a 
repair confirmation code (RCC). 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.15 



□ RUNNING APPLECAT II/IIX 



Materials Required 



Macintosh II or Macintosh IIx (unit under test, or UUT) 

Known-good Macintosh Plus, SE, II, or IIx (test station) 

AppleCAT II/IIx diagnostic disk 

MacTest II/IIx disk 

Blank, 800K disk 

Blank, 1.4 Megabyte disk 

Programmer's switch for the UUT 

Mini-DIN-8-to-mini-DIN-8 serial port cable 

SCSI loopback card 

Mini DIN-8 serial loopback plug 

NuBus™ master card (installed in slot 2) 

Digital multimeter or volt/ohmmeter 

#2 Phillips screwdriver 






Setting Up 
Test Station 
and UUT 



1. Connect the test station to a wall socket with an 
AC power cord. 

2. Place the Macintosh II/Macintosh IIx (UUT) next to 
the test station. 

3. Connect the UUT to a wall socket with an AC power 
cord. 

4. Connect the SCSI loopback card to the SCSI port 
(Figure 3-4, #1) on the UUT. 

5. Connect the serial loopback plug to the printer port 
(Figure 3-4, #2) on the UUT. 




Figure 3-4 



3.16 /Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 




Figure 3-5 

6. Install the NuBus master card in the second slot 
(Figure 3-5, #1) from the power supply of the UUT. 
The card must be installed in slot 2 to work 
correctly. The video card should be in slot 1 
(Figure 3-5, #2). 

7. Connect one end of the serial port cable (Figure 3-6, 
#1) to the modem port (Figure 3-6, #2) on the UUT. 

8. Connect the other end to the modem port (Figure 
3-6, #3) on the test station. 

9. Connect a keyboard or mouse (Figure 3-6, #4) to the 
UUT. 




Figure 3-6 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.17 



10. Verify that the programmer's switch (Figure 3-7) is 
installed. With the front of the Macintosh II or 
Macintosh IIx (UUT) facing you, insert the two long 
tabs of the programmer's switch into the 2nd and 5th 
open slots from the back, along the right side of the 
UUT. Push the switch until it snaps into place or 
you are certain it is secure. 



i 



The programmer's switch has two parts. The front 
part of the switch is a reset switch. Pressing it is 
just like turning the power switch off and back on. 
The back part of the switch is an interrupt switch. 
Pressing the interrupt switch places the UUT in 
interrupt mode. 




Figure 3-7 



3.18/ Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Establishing 
Communication 



1. Insert the AppleCAT II/IIx disk into the test 
station, and power on the test station. 

2. Open the disk icon and then the AppleCAT II/IIx 
icon. The AppleCAT II/IIx Start window (Figure 
3-8) will appear on the test station screen. 

3. Make sure that all disks are ejected from the UUT. 






4. Power on the UUT. If you hear only the boot tone (a 
single chord), you are not in interrupt mode. To get 
into interrupt mode, wait until an arrow appears in 
the upper left corner of the UUT screen (about 4 
seconds per megabyte of installed memory), and then 
press the interrupt switch (see Figure 3-7). When in 
interrupt mode, or test mode, the UUT can respond to 
information received over the communication port. 

IMPORTANT: If you hear any additional chords after the 
single boot tone, you are already in interrupt/test mode. 
Do not hit the interrupt switch. The Macintosh II/IIx will 
automatically go into interrupt mode if an error is detected 
at power on. 

Note: If a MacTest II/IIx disk was left in the UUT 
disk drive during power on, the MacTest II/IIx disk 
may boot before you can press the interrupt switch 
on the UUT. If this happens, eject the MacTest II/IIx 
disk, power off the UUT, and start over at step 4. 



Applet AT 11/ 1 IK 



Start 



Pause 







ZttJL 



llllllllllllllllllllllHlH 



Status: 

Click Start to begi n selected tests. 



Figure 3-8 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.19 



Using the 

AppleCATII/llx 

Menus 



Before you start AppleCAT II/IIx, you may use the 
AppleCAT II/IIx menus to select the tests you want to 
run or to select other features of the diagnostic. 

Note: You must make your test selections before 
you start AppleCAT II/IIx. Changes to the test 
selections cannot be made while AppleCAT II/IIx is 
running. If you do not use the Test Selections menu, 
the default test selection will include the following 
tests: 



Logic Board 

Right Hand Internal Drive 



IMPORTANT: Selecting specific tests shortens the 
AppleCAT II/IIx test, hut cannot find all faulty modules. 
Only the default test selections will ensure a complete 
system check. 



Options Menu 



The Options menu contains the Test Selections submenu 
(Figure 3-9). When Test Selections is chosen, the 
following window appears: 



RppleCflT I l/l Ik Test Selection 
13 Logic Board 
□ Macintosh II Uideo Card 



Internal Driues: 
13 Right 
□ Left 



| OK \ ( Cancel ) 



Figure 3-9 

Test Selections allows you to select and run certain 
tests individually. To select a test, click in the box 
next to the name of the item to be tested. The box will 
display an X. To deselect the test, click again in the 
box to remove the X. When you have selected all the 
tests you wish, click the OK button. You will be 
returned to the AppleCAT II/IIx Start window. 

Note: Test Selections will remain unchanged until 
you change them or you reboot AppleCAT II/IIx. 



3.20 / Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






1. Logic Board: This test verifies the correct 
functioning of the following circuitry on the 
Macintosh II and Macintosh IIx logic boards: 



ROM 

Memory Size 

CPU Data Bus and Address Bus 

Memory (RAM) 

VIA (Versatile Interface Adaptor) 

Internal Clock 

Parameter RAM 

Serial Ports (SCO 

SCSI Bus 

NuBus Control Circuitry 

IWM/SWIM (Disk Controller IC) 

FPU (Floating Point Unit) 

Apple Desktop Bus 

Sound Chip 



Note: Although AppleCAT II/IIx tests the SCSI 
circuitry on the logic board, it does not test the 
internal SCSI hard disk. To test the hard disk, 
use the Macintosh Hard Disk Drive Diagnostic 
disk (see Section 3, Diagnostics, in the SCSI 
Hard Disk Drives Technical Procedures). 

2. Macintosh n Video Card: This test checks the video 
RAM on the Macintosh II Video Card (for the 
Macintosh II and Macintosh IIx), and the video DAC 
(digital-to-analog converter). The Macintosh II Video 
Card must be installed in Slot 1 before running this 
test. (The NuBus master card should be in slot 2.) 

3. Internal Drives: This test will verify the proper 
functioning of both the right and left drives. 

Note: Testing the internal, 3.5-inch drives will 
require swapping blank disks in the UUT. Refer to 
"Running the Tests" (step 5), for more information. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics / 3.21 



File Menu 



The File menu displays the following items. All are 
dimmed except Stop and Quit. 



• 


Open... 


[Command-O] 


• 


Close 


(Dimmed unless a desk 
accessory is open) 


© 


Save Test Selections 


(Option not available) 


• 


Stop 


[Command-.] 


9 


Quit 


[Command-Q] 



1. Stop: Select Stop to end the diagnostic and return 
to the AppleCAT II/IIx Start window. 

2. Quit: Select Quit to exit the program and return to 
the desktop. 






Apple Menu 



The Apple (#) menu contains the following three 
choices: 



1. About Diagnostic: When selected, a dialog box 
displays the diagnostic name, version number, date 
of release, serial number, and a copy-protect 
statement. 

2. Control Panel: With this option you can set 
preferences for things such as speaker volume, 
mouse tracking, whether or not AppleTalk is 
connected, and the desktop pattern. 

3. Key Caps: When selected, Key Caps displays a 

window with a keyboard. 



Help 



The Help menu will be available with a later release of 
AppleCAT II/IIx. Until the help screens are 
implemented, the Help menu will remain dimmed. Help 
will contain the following items: 

• What is AppleCAT II/IIx? 

• Configuration of Unit Under Test 

• Special Tools 

• Setup 

• Establishing Communication 



3.22 / Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Running 
the Tests 



After selecting the tests you wish to run using 
Test Selections, you are ready to start AppleCAT II/IIx. 
Click on the Start button in the AppleCAT II/IIx 
window. Please note the following: 



1. The Status line at the bottom of the AppleCAT II/IIx 
window will keep you informed of the tests being 
performed and their results. 

Note: If the message Could not establish 

communication appears on the Status line, you may 
have inserted the MacTest II/IIx disk in the UUT 
disk drive before powering on. If this message 
appears, follow the instructions given in the 
AppleCAT II/IIx window. 

2. AppleCAT II/IIx will interact with you throughout 
each stage of the testing. When performing internal 
drive tests, you will be required to perform setup 
steps (see step 5). When the UUT fails a test or 
indicates a problem, AppleCAT II/IIx will prompt 
you for more information or recommend a repair. 

3. AppleCAT II/IIx will ask you for information that it 
cannot obtain electronically. The screen will 
display a choice of answers. Select the most 
appropriate answer in each situation. After 
selecting a response, click OK to continue. 

CA UTION: Do not click the OK button until you've 
completed every instruction given on the screen. Failure 
to complete the instructions may misdirect the diagnostic. 

4. If the UUT is turned off to replace or reinstall a 
module: 

a) Verify that all cables and test fixtures are 
reattached before powering on. 

b) Eject all disks from the UUT before powering 
on. 

c) If you do not hear the test mode chimes, wait 
until an arrow appears onscreen (about 4 seconds 
per megabyte of RAM), and then press the 
interrupt switch to get into the test mode. 

d) Click Start at the test station to restart the test. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics / 3.23 



SETUP REQUIRED: 



800K Disk 



DO THIS: 



Insert a BLANK, 
WRITE-ENABLED 800K disk 
in the left disk drive. 







Done 



Figure 3-10 

5. AppleCAT II/IIx will also ask you to perform setup 
steps. When the Setup Required window (Figure 
3-10) appears, insert the requested disk. AppleCAT 
II/IIx will specify which drive to use. After inserting 
the disk, click Done to continue the test. AppleCAT 
II/IIx will request the following disks: 



• 800K Disk (blank and write-enabled) 

• High Density Disk (blank and write-enabled; for 
FDHD drive testing only) 

• Write-protected, MacTest II/IIx Disk 

You may halt the testing by clicking on Stop or 
Pause any time during the tests: 

a) Choose Stop to halt the testing and to return to 
the AppleCAT II/IIx window. Choose Start when 
you wish to begin the testing sequence again 
from the beginning. 



6. 



b) Choose Pause if you wish to discontinue testing 
temporarily. Choose Continue to resume testing 
from the point of interruption. 

IMPORTANT: Please read all messages and instructions 
carefully. Do only what AppleCAT II/IIx specifically 
instructs you to do. 



3.24 / Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Repair 
Confirmation 
Code (RCC) 



When the UUT passes its final test, AppleCAT II/IIx 
issues a repair confirmation code (RCC). The RCC is an 
eight-digit information record that contains the 
diagnostic name, the diagnostic version number, the 
replaced module name, and the repair sequence the 
program followed. This RCC should be entered on the 
SRO form that accompanies the returned module. 

If AppleCAT II/IIx finds no problems, one of the 
following RCC codes will be displayed: 

• All selected tests passed 20ZZ-019G 

• All selected tests passed 0MZZ-019G 

If AppleCAT II/IIx is unable to identify the problem 
with the UUT, AppleCAT II/IIx will issue an RCC 
beginning with one of these four-digit prefixes: 

• 20ZZ-xxxx for the Macintosh II 

• OMZZ-xxxx for the Macintosh IIx 



Helpful 
Suggestions 






If you receive an RCC with one of the prefixes shown 
above, refer to Section 4, Troubleshooting, for 
information that can help you isolate the problem. Also 
keep in mind that AppleCAT II/IIx is unable to identify 
a system failure if any of the following is true: 



• The bad module is failing intermittently. 

• The system configuration changes during the test 
(memory is removed or added, or system power 
is removed). 

• Selected modules are tested; only the default 
tests perform a complete system check. 

• The replacement module itself is bad. 

• You provide inaccurate input to AppleCAT II/IIx, 
or set up the test station incorrectly. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics / 3.25 



□ SCSI LOOPBACK JUMPER PROCEDURE 



To Determine 
if a Jumper 
Is Needed 






To be used with MacTest II/IIx and AppleCAT II/IIx, 
the SCSI loopback card must be jumpered between Pin 25 
of Jl and Pin 14 of RP1. On new SCSI loopback cards, 
the jumper has been etched into the printed circuit. 
Only cards with the old PCB artwork need the jumper 
procedure. 

Note: This modification does not interfere with the 
card's use on other Macintosh or Apple II family 
systems, except that to work on Apple II systems 
the card must be connected to a notched mouse 
cable. (For further information on the notched 
cable, refer to SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures, Section 5, "SCSI Interface Card.") 



To Identify 
a New Card 



To determine if you have a new card, which will not 
need to be jumpered, look at the back of the card. If 
the jumper is included in the artwork, there will be an 
A instead of double zeros (00) at the end of the part 
number, which is located under the words "APPLE 
COMPUTER" (Figure 3-11, #1). These new cards do not 
have to be jumpered. 




Figure 3-11 






3.26 / Diagnostics 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






External 
Jumpers on 
Old Cards 



Some cards with the 00 part number and the old 
artwork were modified with an external jumper 
during the manufacturing process. Therefore, if your 
card has a 00 part number, check to see if it has an 
external jumper from Pin 25 of Jl to Pin 14 of RP1 
(Figure 3-12, #1). If it has no external jumper, you 
must install one yourself. 




wwwwmwwwmw ww 



Fligure3-12 



Summary 



To summarize: 



If # on back 
ends with: 



Do this: 



00 



Nothing 

(Jumper is present in artwork.) 

Check to see if external jumper 
is present. If not, install jumper. 



To Install 
the Jumper 



If you find that the card must be jumpered, solder a 
wire connection between Pin 25 of Jl and Pin 14 of 
RP1, as shown in Figure 12. (The pins are not numbered 
on the board. In the orientation shown in Figure 12, Pin 
25 is the pin closest to the upper left corner of the 
card, and Pin 14 is in the middle line of pins, and 
closest to the left edge of the card.) 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Diagnostics / 3.27 






fk Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 

Section 4 - Troubleshooting 



□ CONTENTS 








4.2 


Introduction 




4.2 


Before You Start 




4.2 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




4.2 


How to Use the Troubleshooting Flowcharts 




4.3 


Things to Remember 




4.5 


Module Exchange Information 




4.5 


Logic Board 




4.6 


Internal SCSI Hard Disk Drives 




4.6 


Macintosh Ilfx 1 MB SIMMs 




4.7 


Startup and Error Chords 




4.7 


Introduction 




4.7 


Startup Chord 




4.7 


Error Chords 




4.8 


Summary 




4.10 


Symptom Chart 




4.10 


System Problems 




4.11 


Video Problems 




4.13 


Floppy Disk Drive Problems 




4.14 


SCSI Hard Disk Drive Problems 




4.15 


Peripheral Problems 




4.17 


Miscellaneous Problems 




4.19 


Troubleshooting Flowcharts 




4.28 


SIMM Verification 




4.28 


Introduction 




4.28 


Isolating a Defective SIMM 




4.29 


Verification 




4.30 


Verification Flowchart Notes 




4.32 


Battery Verification 




4.32 


Introduction 




4.32 


Materials Required 




4.32 


Verification Procedure 




4.34 


Customer's Configuration Chart 



Note: If a step is underlined, detailed procedures for 
that step can be found in Section 2, Take-Apart. 






Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.1 



□ INTRODUCTION 



Use this troubleshooting section if you are unable to 
boot the MacTest II/IIx (Macintosh II or IIx) or MacTest 
MP (Macintosh Ilfx) disk, or if the diagnostic is unable 
to detect a module failure. After you repair the system, 
run the test disk again to verify system operation. 



Before 
You Start 



Read the articles and subarticles titled "Things to 
Remember," "Module Exchange Information," "Startup 
and Error Chords," "SIMM Verification," and "Battery 
Verification" before you begin troubleshooting. You 
need the information provided in these sections to 
troubleshoot the Macintosh n, nx, and nfx effectively. 



How to Use the 
Symptom Chart 



To use the symptom chart, first find the symptom that 
most nearly describes the problem; then perform the 
first corrective action on the solution list. If that 
corrective action does not fix the problem, go to the 
ne^tt action. If you replace a module and find that the 
problem remains, reinstall the original module before 
you go on to the next action. 

If the symptoms displayed by the system are not listed 
in the symptom chart or if the system is not displaying 
a clearly defined problem, use the troubleshooting 
flowcharts. 



How to Use the 

Troubleshooting 

Flowcharts 



There are five numbered troubleshooting flowcharts for 
the Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx computers. These 
flowcharts are useful in troubleshooting startup-related 
problems. 

The troubleshooting flowcharts are designed to verify 
operation of the computer in its minimum configuration. 
Therefore, before using the troubleshooting flowcharts, 
remove any options installed and disconnect any 
external peripherals. 

Starting at the top of Flowchart 1, answer the questions 
and proceed down the chart. When you arrive at a 
rectangular box containing a list of actions, perform the 
actions in the sequence listed. On completion, return 
to the preceding diamond box. If the problem remains, 
reinstall the original module before you go on to the 
next action. 



4.2 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Each of the flowcharts includes references to notes on 
the opposite page. These notes provide additional 
instructions or referrals to other procedures. 



Things to 
Remember 



Be sure to follow all electrostatic discharge 
precautions when working on the computer. Refer 
to the You Oughta Know tab in Apple Service 
Technical Procedures for additional information. 



If available, use a known-good monitor and video 
interface card. This will isolate the problem to the 
CPU, internal drives, keyboard, and mouse. 

To ensure that customers get back the same system 
configuration that they bring in, record the 
following information before beginning: 

- Type and serial number of any NuBus expansion 
cards 

- Size and capacity of internal SCSI hard disk or 
type (800K or 1.4 MB) of second floppy disk 
drive, if installed 

- Number and types of SIMMs installed 

- Macintosh II only 

- Whether an IWM or SWIM disk controller 
chip is installed 

- Version of ROM installed 

- Whether an HMMU or PMMU is installed 

- Macintosh Ilfx only 

- Whether the logic board has the parity option 

- Whether parity or nonparity SIMMs are 
installed 

- Whether a SCSI filter and/or terminator is 
installed 

At the end of this section is a form you can use to 
record the customer's system configuration. 

Before you begin troubleshooting, remove all NuBus 
expansion cards and disconnect all external serial, 
SCSI, and ADB devices (except the keyboard and 
mouse). 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. May 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.3 



After the computer is fully operational, each option 
card or peripheral should be installed and tested. 
Install one device and test the system before adding 
any others. Repeat the install-and-test process until 
all devices have been installed and tested. 






Mark each known-good SIMM module on the 
exchange logic board with white correction fluid or 
a small sticker to prevent confusion during the 
troubleshooting procedure. 

Use a known-good copy of the diagnostic disk. 

During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
soft chord is emitted. If you do not hear a medium- 
pitched soft chord, refer to "Startup and Error 
Chords" for additional information. 



The Macintosh II and IIx require system software 
6.0.2 or later. The Macintosh Ilfx requires version 
6.0.5 or later. If an earlier version of the system is 
installed, install the correct version and reverify 
the failure before beginning troubleshooting. Many 
times problems that appear hardware related are 
actually caused by software. System software 
installation procedures are included in Section 1, 
Basics. 






When instructed to replace the logic board only, 
place the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 

Note: If you are removing SIMMs from the logic 
board, use the SIMM removal tool. See You Ought a 
Know for instructions. 



Macintosh II 
Only 



When instructed to replace the logic board only on a 
system with a 1.4 MB Apple FDHD disk drive, 
remove the ROMs and SWIM chip included with the 
replacement logic board, and install the customer's 
SIMMs, ROMs, and SWIM chip on the replacement 
logic board. If a PMMU upgrade is installed, swap 
the customer's PMMU for the HMMU on the 
replacement logic board. 



4.4 / Troubleshooting 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Macintosh llfx 
Only 



Make sure an internal SCSI terminator is installed 
on any system that does not have an internal SCSI 
hard disk installed. 



Systems containing an Apple internal SCSI hard disk 
manufactured before March 19, 1990 may require the 
use of an internal SCSI filter. See Section 5, 
Additional Procedures, "Macintosh llfx — SCSI 
Termination" for additional information. 

If an internal Apple SCSI hard disk drive is being 
replaced, an internal SCSI filter may be required. 
See Section 5, Additional Procedures, "Macintosh 
llfx — SCSI Termination" for additional information. 



□ MODULE EXCHANGE INFORMATION 



At the end of this section is a form you can use to 
record the customer's system configuration. Feel free 
to copy it for your own use. 



Logic Board 



To make sure the customer always receives the same 
logic board configuration that he or she brought in, be 
sure to record the following Information before you 
exchange any modules: 



The type of logic board exchanged: 
IIx, or llfx 



Macintosh II, 



• The amount of memory installed 

• For the Macintosh II: 

- ROM version 

- Whether an IWM or SWIM is installed 

- Type of memory management unit that is 
installed: the HMMU (standard) or the PMMU (a 
68851 IC upgrade) 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. May 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.5 



• For the Macintosh life: 

- Parity or nonparity logic board 

- Parity or nonparity SIMMs 

- SCSI filter and/or terminator 






Internal 
SCSI Hard 
Disk Drives 



Internal SCSI hard disks are shipped without the SCSI 
cable connected. Be sure to keep the SCSI cable with 
the customer's system. It is sold as a separate 
replacement part and is not part of any module. 

The SCSI power cable is included with all internal SCSI 
drive modules. 



Macintosh llfx 
1 MB SIMMs 



Some Macintosh llfx systems and 4 MB expansion 
memory kits were manufactured with defective DRAM 
chips from NEC. Systems using these defective NEC 
SIMMs can experienced a variety of failures. These 
failures include: 

• System doesn't boot 

• System hangs on first application launch 

• System boots but loses video (memory related) 

• System sounds error chords 

• Video display exhibits ghosting 

• System displays an ID error and locks up 

Macintosh llfx systems with NEC SIMMs that have date 
codes up to and including 9052 will exhibit these 
failures. The location of the date code is shown in 
Figure 4-1. SIMMs with date codes of 9052 and below 
should be replaced. 






Date 
Code 




or\f)r\oof)r\rif)f)f)f)()^r\()f)Of)f)r)f)r\f\f)mn 



Figure 4-1 



4.6 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






□ STARTUP AND ERROR CHORDS 



Introduction 



When the computer is powered on, a series of self-tests 
are performed. If any part of the self-test fails, a 
sequence of chords will sound. 

If you are unable to interpret the chords, use the 
flowcharts and ignore the question about the startup 
chord on Flowchart 1. 



Startup Chord 



During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
chord is emitted; then a disk icon appears on the screen. 
The disk icon will have a flashing question mark (if a 
startup disk is not found) or a smiling face (if a startup 
disk is found). 



Error Chords 



If a startup chord and additional chords sound, a blank 
gray screen usually appears. There will always be 
three chords played when an error is encountered 
during startup: startup chord, error chord, and test 
monitor chord. 



Refer to the list of failure areas below. The list 
includes a description of each error chord, the problem 
it indicates, and what to do to correct the problem. 



Initial Failure 



A short, harsh chord indicates a failure during the 
initial hardware self-tests. To correct the problem: 

1. Exchange the logic board. (Install the customer's 
SIMM modules on the exchange board. Be sure you 
mark the known-good SIMMs that you remove from 
the exchange logic board.) 

2. If exchanging the logic board doesn't work, use the 
customer's logic board and exchange the SIMMs 
only. (Refer to "SIMM Verification" in this section 
for complete instructions.) 

If the system still does not work, you will need to 
verify the customer's SIMMs on the exchange logic 
board. (Refer to "SIMM Verification" in this section 
for complete instructions.) 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.7 



RAM 1 and 2 
Failure 



A long, medium-pitched chord (RAM 1) or a medium- 
then-high pitched then high chord (RAM 2) indicates a 
RAM self-test failure. To correct the problem: 



1. If the failure occurs on a Macintosh Ilfx, refer to 
"Macintosh Ilfx 1 MB SIMMs" under Module 
Exchange Information. 

2. Exchange only the SIMMs in Bank A. (Refer to 
"SIMM Verification" in this section for complete 
instructions.) 

3. Exchange only the SIMMs in Bank B. (Refer to 
"SIMM Verification" in this section for complete 
instructions.) 

4. If these exchanges do not work, exchange the logic 
board. (Install the customer's SIMM modules on the 
exchange board.) 

5. If the system still does not work, you must do the 
SIMM verification with the exchange logic board. 



Test Monitor 



Four chords (from low to high) indicate that the system 
has entered the test monitor. 



Summary 



The following chart summarizes all the preceding 
information on error chords. The left column lists the 
chords, and the right column lists the actions to be taken. 



4.8 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Chord Sequences 



Actions 



Startup, Initial, 
Test Monitor 



1. Replace logic board only . 

2. Perform SIMM verification on customer's logic board. 



Startup, RAM 1, 
Test Monitor 



1. If the failure occurs on a Macintosh Ilfx, refer to 
Macintosh Ilfx 1 MB SIMMs under "Module 
Exchange Information." 

2. Perform SIMM verification of Bank A, then of Bank 
B on customer's logic board. 

3. Replace logic board only . 

4. Perform SIMM verification on replacement logic 
board. 



Startup, RAM 2, 
Test Monitor 



1. If the failure occurs on a Macintosh Ilfx, refer to 
Macintosh Ilfx 1 MB SIMMs under "Module 
Exchange Information." 

2. Perform SIMM verification of Bank A, then of Bank 
B on customer's logic board. 

3. Replace logic board only. 

4. Perform SIMM verification on replacement logic board. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.9 



□ SYMPTOM CHART 



System Problems Solutions 



i 



Does not power on- 
screen is black, 
fan is not running, 
and LED is not lit 



1. Check cables. 

2. Plug the monitor directly into the wall socket, and 
verify that the monitor has power. 

3. Replace power cord. 

4. Check batteries (refer to "Battery Verification"). 

5. Replace power $ypply. 

6. Replace logic board only . 



Clicking, chirping, or 1. 
thumping sound 2. 



Replace power supply . 
Replace logic board only . 



System shuts down 
intermittently 



2. 
3. 
4 
5. 



Make sure air vents on the sides and top of the 
system unit are kept clear. Thermal protection 
circuitry may shut the system down. After 30 to 40 
minutes the system should be OK. 
Replace power cord. 

Check batteries (refer to "Battery Verification"). 
Re place power supp ly. 
Replace logic board only . 






System intermittently 
crashes or locks up 



1. Make sure the correct version of system software is 
being used. 

2. Make sure software is known-good. 

3. Replace logic board only. 

4. Replace SIMMs (refer to "SIMM Verification"). 

5. Replace power supply . 



System doesn't boot 
(Macintosh llfx only) 



- Check whether Apple-labeled SIMMs manufactured 
by NEC have a date code of 9052 or below. If any 
NEC SIMMs have a date code of 9052 or below, 
replace them. Refer to "Module Exchange 
Information" for further information. 



4.10 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






System Problems 
(continued) 



Solutions 



System sounds error 
chords at startup 
(Macintosh llfx only) 



Check whether Apple-labeled SIMMs manufactured 

by NEC have a date code of 9052 or below. If 

any NEC SIMMs have a date code of 9052 or below, 

replace them. Refer to "Module Exchange 

Information" for further information. 

See "Startup and Error Chords" in this section. 



Video Problems 



Solutions 



• Screen is black, 
audio and drive 
operate, fan is 
running, and LED 
is lit 



1. Adjust brightness on monitor. 

2. Replace monitor. 

3. Replace video cable. 

4. Move video interface card to a different slot. 

5. Replace video interface card. 

6. Replace SIMMs (refer to "SIMM Verification"). 

7. Replace logic board . 

8. Replace power supply . 



Screen is black, 
audio and drive 
do not operate, 
but fan is running 
and LED is lit 



1. 

2. 
3. 



5. 
6. 

7. 



Replace video cable. 

Move video interface card to a different slot. 

Replace video interface card (refer to Section 5, 

Additional Procedures). 

Replace SIMMs (refer to "SIMM Verification"). 

Replace logic board . 

Replace power supply . 

Replace monitor. 



• Partial or whole l. 

screen is bright and 2. 

audio is present, 3. 

but no video 4. 

information is visible 5. 



Replace monitor. 

Replace video cable. 

Move video interface card to a different slot. 

Replace video interface card. 

Replace logic board only . 



Screen is completely 
dark, fan is not 
running, and LED is 
not lit 



1. Plug the monitor directly into the wall socket, and 
verify that the monitor has power. 

2. Check batteries (refer to "Battery Verification"). 

3. Replace power supply . 

4. Replace logic board only . 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.11 



Video Problems (continued) Solutions 



Video display exhibits 
"ghosting" 
(Macintosh llfx only) 






Check whether Apple-labeled SIMMs manufactured 
by NEC have a date code of 9052 or below. If 
any NEC SIMMs have a date code of 9052 or below, 
replace them. Refer to "Module Exchange 
Information" for further information. 



System boots and 
then loses video 
(Macintosh llfx only) 



Check whether Apple-labeled SIMMs manufactured 
by NEC have a date code of 9052 or below. If 
any NEC SIMMs have a date code of 9052 or below, 
replace them. Refer to "Module Exchange 
Information" for further information. 



Note: If replacing the monitor corrects the problem, 
refer to the appropriate monitor Technical Procedures 
for monitor troubleshooting information. 



4.12 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Floppy Disk 
Drive Problems 



Solutions 



Internal disk drive 
runs continuously 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Replace internal disk drive cable. 

3. Replace internal floppy disk drive . 

4. Replace logic board only . 



• Audio and video 


1. 


are present, but 
one internal floppy 
drive does not 


2. 
3. 


operate 


4. 
5. 
6. 


• Audio and video 


1. 


are present, but 
neither internal floppy 
drive operates 


2. 

3. 

4. 


• Disk ejects; display 
shows icon with 


1. 

2. 


blinking "X" 


3. 

4. 


• Will not eject 
disk 


1. 



Replace bad disk. 

Verify that all external SCSI devices are 

disconnected. 

Replace internal floppy drive cable. 

Replace internal floppy drive . 

Replace logic board only. 

Replace power supply . 



Replace bad disk. 

Verify that all external SCSI devices are 

disconnected. 

Replace power supply . 

Replace logic board only . 



Replace disk with known-good system disk. 
Replace internal disk drive cable. 
Replace internal floppy disk drive . 
Replace logic board only . 



Switch power off and hold mouse button down 
while switching power back on. 
2. Replace floppy disk drive . 



Attempts to eject 
disk but doesn't 



1. Reinsert disk. 

2. Reseat top cover so drive slots line up correctly. 



MS-DOS® drive does 
not recognize a disk 
formatted on a 1.4 MB 
FDHD drive 



If compatibility in reading and writing files with 
the 1.4 MB FDHD is desired, format all disks 
with the MS-DOS drive first. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.13 



SCSI Hard Disk 
Drive Problems 



Solutions 






• Internal hard disk 
will not operate; LED 
doesn't light; drive 
doesn't spin -up 



1. Replace SCSI signal cable. 

2. Replace SCSI power cable. 

3. Replace hard disk . 

4. Repine lQgig bpanj pnly. 



• Drive does not 
appear on the 
desktop 



If the computer is a Macintosh Ilfx, there may be a 
SCSI termination problem. Refer to Section 5, 
Additional Procedures, "Macintosh Ilfx — SCSI 
Termination" to verify that proper SCSI termination 
is being used. 



Data is lost or 
corrupted 



If the computer is a Macintosh Ilfx, there may be a 
SCSI termination problem. Refer to Section 5, 
Additional Procedures, "Macintosh Ilfx — SCSI 
Termination" to verify that proper SCSI termination 
is being used. 



Works with internal or 
external SCSI device 
but will not work with 
both 



1. 



2. 



3. 

4. 

5. 



Check the SCSI device switch setting on the 

external device and make sure it isn't (the 

address of the internal hard disk) or 7 (the 

computer's address). 

If the computer is a Macintosh Ilfx, there may be a 

SCSI termination problem. Refer to Section 5, 

Additional Procedures, "Macintosh Ilfx — SCSI 

Termination" to verify that proper SCSI termination 

is being used. 

Replace the SCSI terminator on the external device. 

Verify that a terminator is installed on the internal 

SCSI drive. 

Refer to SCSI Hard Disk Drive Technical Procedures 

for troubleshooting the external drive. 



4.14 / Troubleshooting 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Peripheral Problems 



Solutions 



• Cursor does not 
move 



1. Check mouse connection. 

2. Inspect the inside of the mouse for a buildup of dirt 
and other contaminants. Clean the mouse if 
necessary. 

3. If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to a 
rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, replace 
keyboard. 

4. If mouse does not work in any ADB port, replace 
mouse. 

5. Replace logic board only . 



Cursor moves, but 
clicking the mouse 
button has no effect 



1. Replace mouse. 

2. Replace logic board only . 



No response to any 
key on the keyboard 



1. Check keyboard connection to ADB port. 

2. Replace keyboard cable. 

3. Replace keyboard. 

4. Replace logic board only . 



Cannot double-click 
to open an application, 
disk, or server 



1. 
2. 



3. 



Remove any multiple system files on the hard disk. 

Clear parameter RAM. Hold down the < Shift > 

< Option >< Command > keys and select Control Panel 

from the Apple pull-down menu. Reset mouse 

controls. 

If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to a 

rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, replace 

keyboard. 

If mouse does not work in any ADB port, replace 

mouse. 

Replace logic board . 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.15 



Peripheral 
Problems (continued) 



Solutions 



Known-good 
ImageWriter® or 
Image Writer II 
will not print 



3. 

4. 



Make sure the correct version of system software is 

being used. 

Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 

are set correctly. 

Replace printer interface cable. 

Replace lQgiC bQ^rcj Qnly. 



Known-good 
LaserWriter® 
will not print 



3. 



Make sure the correct version of system software is 

being used. 

Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 

are set correctly. 

Refer to the Networks tab in Apple Service 

Technical Procedures for more information. 



4.16 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Miscellaneous 
Problems 



Solutions 



No sound from 
speaker 



1. Verify that the volume setting in the Control 
Panel is set to one or above. 

2. Replace speaker. 

3. Replace logic board only . 



• HMMU socket 
does not allow 
PMMU installation 
(Macintosh II only) 



- Replace logic board . Verify that the socket 
is a 13 x 13-pin grid array package and that it 
contains 132 gold contacts inside the socket. 
(Sockets containing only 70 pins do not support the 
PMMU.) 



System hangs when 
the first application is 
launched 
(Macintosh llfx only) 



Check whether Apple-labeled SIMMs manufactured 
by NEC have a date code of 9052 or below. If 
any NEC SIMMs have a date code of 9052 or below, 
replace them. Refer to "Module Exchange 
Information" for further information. 



System displays an 
ID error and then 
locks up 
(Macintosh llfx only) 



Check whether Apple-labeled SIMMs manufactured 
by NEC have a date code of 9052 or below. If 
any NEC SIMMs have a date code of 9052 or below, 
replace them. Refer to "Module Exchange 
Information" for further information. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.17 



Qtaft) 






Power on the system 
without installing a disk. 



YES 



Goto 

Flowchart 

2. 




Interpret error 

chords (see 

Note #1). 



Power off. If a hard disk is installed, 

disconnect the SCSI power 

and signal cables, and disconnect 

the second floppy disk drive, 

if present. 



i 



Power on the computer system 
without installing a disk. 




1. 


Exchange video interface card 




(see Note #3). 


2. 


Exchange logic board only 




(see Note #5). 


3. 


Exchange SIMMs (see Note #4). 


4. 


Exchange power supply. 



Exchange monitor (see Note #2). 
Exchange video cable. 
Exchange video interface card 

(see Note #3). 
Exchange SIMMs (see Note #4). 
Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #5). 
Exchange power supply. 



c 



Go to Flowchart 4A. 



3 



C 



Go to Flowchart 3. 



j 



Flowchart 4-1 



4.18 / Troubleshooting 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



□ TROUBLESHOOTING FLOWCHARTS 



Flowchart 4-1 
Notes 



1. During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
chord is emitted; then a disk icon appears on the 
screen. The disk icon will have a flashing question 
mark (if a startup disk is not found) or a smiling 
face (if a startup disk is found). If either of these 
things does not happen, refer to "Startup and Error 
Chords" for additional information. If you cannot 
interpret the chords, continue with the flowchart. 



2. If exchanging the monitor corrects the problem, 
refer to the Technical Procedures for the monitor to 
isolate the monitor problem to the module level. 

3. If exchanging the video interface card corrects the 
problem, and if the customer's card has the video 
expansion kit installed, refer to Macintosh Family 
Cards Technical Procedures — Macintosh II Video 
Cards, for information on troubleshooting the eight 
replaceable RAMs. 

4. There are two steps to perform when exchanging 
the SIMM modules. Refer to "SIMM Verification" 
for complete instructions on verifying and 
troubleshooting the SIMMs. 

5. If the known-good SIMMs did not correct the 
problem, install the customer's SIMMs on the 
replacement logic board. 






Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Jan 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.19 



Shut down and Install 
another MacTest ll/llx 
or MacTest MP disk. 
Power on. 



Does the test ^S^ YES 
screen appear? 




Power off. If a hard disk is installed, 

remove the SCSI power and cable 

connectors, and disconnect the second 

disk drive cable. 



i 



(Flowchart 2) 

r 



Insert MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP disk. 
Power on. 




NO y^ Does the test 
screen appear? 



Run MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP (see Note #1 ) 



t 



Run Hard Disk Drive Diagnostic (see Note #2). 



( END ) 



Run MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP (see Note #1). 



i 



Run Hard Disk Test (see Note #2). 



Insert MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP disk. Power on. 




1. Exchange drive 1 cable. 

2. Exchange disk drive 1. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board 

only (see Note #3). 



Run MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP (see Note #1) 






C 



Go to Flowchart 4B. 



D 



Flowchart 4-2 



4.20 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Flowchart 4-2 1. For MacTest II/IIx, refer to Section 3, Diagnostics, 

Notes for complete information. For MacTest MP, refer to 

the MacTest MP section of the Macintosh Multiple- 
Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh Family 
Technical Procedures. 

2. Refer to SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures for complete instructions. 

3. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Troubleshooting / 4.21 






( Flowchart 3) 



YES 




Check batteries 
(see Note #1). 




1 . Exchange power supply. 

2. Exchange logic board 

only (see Note #6). 



Exchange batteries 
(see Note #1). 



c 



Go to Flowchart 4A. 



j 



5. 



6. 



Exchange monitor 

(see Note #2). 
Exchange video cable. 
Exchange video interface 

card (see Note #3). 
Exchange SIMMs 

(see Note #4). 
Exchange logic board 

(see Note #5). 
Exchange power supply. 




1. Exchange power supply. 

2. Exchange logic board 

only (see Note #6). 



c 



Go to Flowchart 4 A. 



j 



Flowchart 4-3 



4.22 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Flowchart 4-3 
Notes 



1. Refer to "Battery Verification" for complete 
instructions on checking the lithium batteries. 

2. If exchanging the monitor corrects the problem, 
refer to the Technical Procedures for the monitor to 
isolate the monitor problem to the module level. 

3. If exchanging the video interface card corrects the 
problem, and if the customer's card has the video 
expansion kit installed, refer to Macintosh Family 
Cards Technical Procedures — Macintosh II Video 
Cards, for information on troubleshooting the eight 
replaceable RAMs. 

4. There are two steps to perform when exchanging 
the SIMM modules. Refer to "SIMM Verification" 
for complete instructions on verifying and 
troubleshooting the SIMMs. 

5. If the known-good SIMMs did not correct the 
problem, install the customer's SIMMs on the 
replacement logic board. 

6. Exchange only the logic board by installing the 
customer's SIMMs on the replacement logic board. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. May 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.23 



(Flowchart 4A) 



Insert MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP disk. Power on. 




Run MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP disk (see Note #1). 



. 



1 . Exchange drive 1 cable. 

2. Exchange disk drive 1 . 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #2). 



(Flowchart"4B) — ► 



Power off. Reconnect the 

second drive (if installed). 

Power on. 



Does the 
^desktop or a disk icon wit FT" 
^a flashing question mark 

^appear? 

YES 



NO 



1 . Exchange drive 2 cable. 

2. Exchange disk drive 2. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #2). 



Insert MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP disk. Power on. 




Run MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP 
(see Note #1). 



{ Goto 



I 



Flowchart 5 



~j 



1 . Exchange drive 2 cable. 

2. Exchange disk drive 2. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #2). 



Flowchart 4-4 



4.24 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Flowchart 4-4 
Notes 



For MacTest II/IIx, refer to Section 3, Diagnostics 
for complete information. For MacTest MP, refer to 
the MacTest MP section of the Macintosh Multiple- 
Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh Family 
Technical Procedures. 



Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.25 



(Flowchart 5) 



Power off. Reconnect the 

SCSI drive (if installed). 

Power on. 




Insert MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP disk. Power on. 




Run MacTest ll/llx or MacTest MP (see Note #1). 



I 



Run Hard Disk Test (see Note #3). 



I 



Customer has correct configuration 
(see Note #4). 



I 



(end) 



1 . Exchange SCSI power arid 

connector cable. 

2. Exchange SCSI drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #2). 



1 . Exchange SCSI power and 

connector cable. 

2. Exchange SCSI drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #2). 






Flowchart 4-5 



4.26 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Flowchart 4-5 1. For MacTest II/IIx, refer to Section 3, Diagnostics 

Notes for complete information. For MacTest MP, refer to 

the MacTest MP section of the Macintosh Multiple- 
Product Diagnostics tab in the Macintosh Family 
Technical Procedures. 

2. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 

3. Refer to SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures for complete instructions. 

4. The customer must always receive the same system 
configuration he or she brings in. Refer to "Module 
Exchange Information." 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Troubleshooting / 4.27 



□ SIMM VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



The service exchange logic board comes without RAM 
SIMMs. 






The SIMMs installed on the customer's logic board may 
be defective. To check for defective SIMMs, remove all 
of the customer's SIMMs and install known-good 
SIMMs. Mark each known-good SIMM with a dot of 
white correction fluid or a small sticker. Whatever you 
use, be sure it will not come off while you are testing. 

Note: If the system is Macintosh Ilfx, refer to 
Macintosh Ilfx 1 MB SIMMs under "Module Exchange 
Information." 



Isolating a 
Defective SIMM 



1. Remove the top cover and drive mount . 

2. Remove the customer's SIMMs using the SIMM removal 
tool. See You Oughta Know for instructions on how to 
use this tool. 



Note: Using the configuration chart located at the end 
of this section, record the number and the sizes of the 
SIMMs. The customer should get back the same number 
and sizes. Refer to the Apple Technical Procedures 
SIMMs Quick Reference Chart for information on 
identifying the SIMMs. 






3. Figure 4-2. Install the four known-good SIMMs in 
Bank A. 

4. Place the drive mount into position, and connect floppy 
disk drive 1 only. 

5. Power on the system. 

6. Insert the MacTest II/IIx (Macintosh II and IIx) or 
MacTest MP (Macintosh Ilfx) disk in floppy disk 
drive 1. 

If the test boots, run it. Then continue with the 
appropriate verification procedure. 

If the test does not boot, return to the appropriate 
flowchart. 



4.28 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 












-j 


i V 


i — i 


si 


n 


n 





DD B D 




Macintosh II and llx 



Macintosh llfx 



Figure 4-2 



Verification 



If the customer has 256K SIMMs or 1 MB SIMMs 
installed, you will need to verify all of them. Use 
Flowchart 4-6 and referenced notes to perform the 
verification of the SIMMs. 



Materials Required 



If verifying 256K SIMMs (Macintosh II and llx only), 
you will need four 256K known-good SIMMs 

If verifying 1 MB SIMMs, you will need four 1 MB 
known-good SIMMs of the correct speed (60, 80, or 
120-nanoseconds) and type (parity or nonparity) 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.29 



Verification 

Flowchart 

Notes 



1. Figure 4-3. Locate Bank A on the logic board 
and install three known-good SIMMs. 

2. During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
chord is emitted; then a disk icon appears on the 
screen. The disk icon will have a flashing question 
mark (if a startup disk is not found) or a smiling 
face (if a startup disk is found). If either of these 
events does not happen, refer to "Startup and Error 
Chords" for additional information. 

3. Be sure to label the defective SIMM so it will not 
be mixed up with the others. 

4. Figure 4-3. Return to the beginning of the 
flowchart and perform the same procedure for the 
SIMMs in Bank B. 



i 



BankB 




Bank A 




I 



Macintosh II and llx 



Macintosh llfx 



Figure 4-3 






4.30 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






(Verification Flowchart) 



Install three known-good 

SIMMs in Bank A 

(see Note #1). 



I 












Install one of the customer's SIMMs 
in the empty slot in Bank A. 












. NO 








i 






Place the drive mount into position, 

connect the right drive cable only, 

and power on the system. 






^r\§ a normal ^v 

^•'startup chord generateoV. 

^/^ and is a disk with a flashing ^s. 

V,. question mark displayed ^S 

N. on the video screen ^/^ 

^Si [see Note #2)?^^ 

[YES 

>^ Is this the last ^v. 

^^ customer's SIMM to be ^^ 
x. installed into Bank A? ^^ 










NO 


Power off the system. 
Remove and set aside the 
customer's bad SIMM 
(see Note #3). 








Remove another 

known-good 

marked SIMM. 





YES 



C END \ 



Flowchart 4-6 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.31 



□ BATTERY VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



There are two lithium batteries on the main logic board. 
These batteries are part of the power-on circuit. If 
either battery falls below specifications, both must be 
removed and replaced. 

WARNING: Lithium batteries, the type used in the 
Macintosh ll/llx/llfx, have some potential for explosion if 
improperly handled Follow the procedure below exactly 
as written. 






Materials Required 



Voltmeter 



Verification 
Procedure 



Figure 4-4. To check the lithium batteries with a 
voltmeter: 

1. Be sure power is off. Then remove the top cover . 

2. Set the voltmeter range to measure 10 volts DC. 

3. Touch and hold the positive probe of the voltmeter 
to the positive side of one of the batteries. 

4. Touch and hold the ground probe of the voltmeter to 
the negative side of the same battery. 

5. The reading for a good battery should be 3.2 volts 
or higher. 

6. Repeat steps 3, 4, and 5 for the other battery. 

If either battery falls below 3.2 volts, replace both 
batteries. Refer to Section 5, Additional Procedures, 
for replacement instructions. 



■ 



4.32 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Positive 



Positive , 



i 




Figure 4-4 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.33 



□ CUSTOMER'S CONFIGURATION CHART 



The chart below can be copied and used to keep track 
of a customer's system configuration. Once the chart 
has been filled out, attach it to the system. The chart 
will help you make absolutely sure that the customer 
receives the same configuration that he or she brought 
in. 



Customer 

Model 

Serial Number 



Internal SCSI Hard Disk Drives 



Storage 
Capacity 



□ 20 MB □ 160 MB 

□ 40 MB □ Other: 

] 80 MB 



Disk □ 3.5 inch 
slze ] 5.25 Inch 



Internal Floppy Drives 



Left D800K 
Drive □ 1.4 MB 



Right D800K 
Drive | ] 1.4 MB 



NuBus Cards 



Type 



Serial Number 



SloM 
Slot 2 
Slot 3 
Slot 4 
Slot 5 
Slot 6 



SIMMs 



□ 256 K 
Bank A □ 1 MB - Parity 

] 1 MB - Nonparity 



□ 256 K 
Bank B □ 1 MB - Parity 

] 1 MB - Nonparity 



Macintosh II Only 



Memory ] HMMU 

Management 1 — . 

Unit □ PMMU 



Floppy DlWM 
Controller Q SWIM 



ROM D^vA 
Rev □ R ev B 



Macintosh llfx Only 



Logic □ P ar ty 
Board —J Nonparity 



□ Yes 



SCSI 
Filter 
Installed LJ No 



□ Yes 



SCSI 

Terminator , — , 
Installed |_| No 






4.34 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Jan 91 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






« Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 

Section 5 - Additional Procedures 



□ CONTENTS 








5.3 


Batteries 




5.3 


Introduction 




5.3 


Overview 




5.5 


Battery Holder Board Installation 




5.9 


Battery Replacement 




5.10 


Logic Board RAM Identification and Upgrades 




5.10 


Introduction 




5.10 


Identification 




5.11 


Upgrades 




5.12 


Logic Board Upgrades 




5.12 


Macintosh IIx Logic Board Upgrade 




5.13 


Macintosh Ilfx Logic Board Upgrade 




5.14 


Macintosh II 




5.14 


Paged Memory Management Unit Upgrade 




5.15 


FDHD SuperDrive Upgrade 




5.18 


Macintosh Ilfx 




5.18 


SCSI Termination 



Note: If a step is underlined, detailed procedures for 
that step can be found in Section 2, Take-Apart. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. May 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.1 



□ BATTERIES 



Introduction 



Lithium thionyl chloride batteries, the type used in the 
Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx have some potential for 
explosion if improperly handled. The following 
precautions should be taken when storing, handling, or 
disposing of lithium batteries: 

• Lithium batteries should be stored in a designated, 
well-marked area with limited access. 

• Apple's lithium batteries are sealed in individual 
zip-lock wrappers. Upon receipt, inspect the 
integrity of the wrappers, and store the batteries in 
the same packaging in which they were received. 

• Lithium batteries cannot be recharged and, 
therefore, require disposal when exhausted. In 
addition to its explosive potential, lithium is water- 
reactive and must be disposed of as hazardous waste. 
Therefore, Apple recommends the following course 
of action: 

After removing an exhausted battery from the board, 
clip off the lead wires (necessary for soldered 
batteries) and place the battery into the zip-lock 
wrapper and packaging from which the replacement 
battery was taken. Mark the battery DEAD and 
return it to Apple, where it will be disposed of 
following EPA guidelines. 



Overview 



You can use a voltmeter to check the condition of the 
two long-life lithium batteries in the Macintosh II, IIx, 
and Ilfx. Refer to "Battery Verification," in Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, for directions. 

On a Macintosh II or IIx that does not have a battery 
holder board, the batteries are either soldered directly 
to the logic board or encased in battery holders that are 
soldered to the logic board. In either case, follow the 
procedures in "Battery Holder Board Installation." 

On a Macintosh II or IIx that has a battery holder board 
already installed or on a Macintosh Ilfx, follow the 
procedure in "Battery Replacement." 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.3 



I 



Batteries 



njiiiiiiHiiLJ 







• 



Figure 5-1 






5.4 / Additional Procedures 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






Battery Holder Board 
Installation 



To use the battery holder board, you must remove the 
batteries (and battery holders, if present) from the 
logic board, solder the battery holder board to the logic 
board, and install the batteries and battery covers on 
the battery holder board. 



Materials Required 



Soldering iron (50-watt maximum) 

Desoldering tool 

60/40 resin-core solder 

Battery holder board 

Small wire cutters 

Grounded workbench and wriststrap 

Two lithium batteries 



Installation 



Follow the steps below to remove the batteries from 
the logic board, solder the battery holder board to the 
logic board, and install the batteries in the battery 
holders: 



1. Remove the logic board . 

2. Figure 5-1. Locate the two batteries or the two 
battery holders on the front of the logic board. 

Note: Be sure to leave the lead wire long enough 
so that you can pull it out of the logic board when 
you melt the solder that holds the lead wire in 
place. 

3. If the batteries are soldered to the logic board, cut 
the lead wires that hold the batteries. Then follow 
the battery disposal procedures explained in the 
introduction to this section. 

CAUTION: Use a 50-watt (or less) soldering iron. 
Excessive heat may cause damage to the logic board. 

4. Turn the logic board over. Locate the four soldered 
leads that held the batteries or battery holders in 
place. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.5 



I 



Positive End 



Positive End Holes 




njfl!^ y u I '\j \ 



□ □ ^M 

ra jg jg ja jg E 







i 



Figure 5-2 






5.6 / Additional Procedures 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 









5. Desolder the four connections. If the batteries 
were soldered to the logic board, be sure to remove 
the wire from each hole and clear the hole of any 
solder. 

CAUTION: Do not force the connections free or you may 
remove the traces from the board. Repeat step 5 if 
necessary. 

6. Figure 5-2. Insert the battery holder board so its 
positive-marked end is inserted into the two 
positive-marked holes on the logic board, and so the 
battery holder board is flush with the logic board. 

CAUTION: Be sure the positive side of the battery holder 
board is in the correct location. Failure to do so can result 
in damage to the logic board. 

7. Solder the battery holder board into place. 

8. Install the batteries and the battery covers on the 
battery holder board. If necessary, refer to "Battery 
Replacement." 

9. Replace the logic board . 

10. Use the Control Panel to reset the clock, mouse, 
desktop pattern, and volume control settings. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Additional Procedures / 5.7 






Battery Holders 



I — LJiffiHHHHHH»fflHHH}M_r 



T^ 



dD 



99 



QQflij 



M JS 



1 



DDd 
DD a 
■gi "gs "aj B3 h DD o LJL, 

. nm oni nmuu . p^ I 





□ DDD 
D 0_ 
DO D ^ 



D D 








Figure 5-3 



5.8 / Additional Procedures 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Battery 
Replacement 



The following procedure covers the removal and 
replacement of batteries installed in battery holders. If 
you are changing batteries in a Macintosh II or IIx and 
there is no battery holder board installed, refer to 
"Battery Holder Board Installation." 



Materials Required 



Small flat-blade screwdriver 
Two batteries 



Remove 



To remove the batteries from the plastic battery holder, 
follow these steps: 

1. Figure 5-3A. Remove the top cover from the 
computer and locate the battery holders. 

2. Figure 5-3B. If there is a cover on the battery 
holder, remove it by inserting a small flat-blade 
screwdriver between the cover latch and the battery 
holder and gently prying the latch away from the 
holder. The plastic cover will lift off. 

3. Use your fingers to remove the batteries from the 
battery holders. 



Replace 



To replace the batteries in the battery holder, follow 
these steps: 



1. Orient the new battery so that the end marked "+" 
matches the "+" on the main logic board. Insert the 
battery in the battery holder, and, if applicable, 
replace the plastic cover. 

2. Replace the top cover . 

3. Use the Control Panel to reset the clock, mouse, 
desktop pattern, and volume control settings. 

4. Package and label the old batteries as directed in 
the introduction to this section, and return them to 
Apple for proper disposal. 



Macintosh ll/Ilx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.9 



□ LOGIC BOARD RAM IDENTIFICATION AND UPGRADES 



Introduction 



RAM for the Macintosh II, IIx, and Hfx is provided in 
packages known as Single In-line Memory Modules 
(SIMMs). A SIMM is a small, rectangular-shaped circuit 
board, with two, eight, or nine memory chips. SIMMs 
containing nine memory chips are for use in Macintosh 
life systems equipped with parity checking. The 
memory chips may be surface-mounted or they may be 
mounted through the board. Each SIMM board has 
contacts on one edge that fit into sockets on the logic 
board. 



i 



Note: When you are removing SIMMs, use the SIMM 
removal tool. See You Oughta Know for instructions on 
using the removal tool. 



Identification 



The SIMMs are available with two sizes of RAM (256K 
and 1 MB) and come in several configurations that can 
be used interchangeably. The SIMM Quick Reference 
Chart should be consulted to obtain current SIMM 
identification information. 

CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to damage from 
ESP and skin acid Handle only by the edges! 



) 



Speed 



You must use 120 ns (or faster) SIMMs on the 
Macintosh n and Macintosh Ux. The Macintosh nfx 
uses 80 ns (or faster) SIMMs in systems without the 
parity checking option; 60 ns (or faster) in systems with 
parity checking. SIMMs with a slower rating will 
cause serious timing problems, resulting in system 
crashes. The RAM speed is usually indicated by the -xx 
number after the manufacturer's part number. For 
example, -12 indicates 120 ns SIMMs, -10 indicates 100 
ns SIMMs, -8 indicates 80 ns, and -6 indicates 60 ns. 



CAUTION: Mitsubishi 1 MB SIMMs for the Macintosh IIx, 
which are labeled "For 030 Systems Only, " can be used 
only in systems with 68030 microprocessors. Therefore, 
do not use the Mitsubishi 1 MB SIMM modules in the 
Macintosh II. 

LaserWriter II SIMMs cannot be used in the Macintosh Hfx. 
Although electrically interchangeable, Macintosh Hfx 
SIMMs are 60 and 80ns; LaserWriter II SIMMs are 120ns. 



5.10 / Additional Procedures 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Upgrades 



Various RAM upgrades are possible on the Macintosh II, 
IIx, and Ilfx depending on the number and size of the 
SIMMs that you install on the logic board. 




Macintosh II and IIx 



Macintosh Ilfx 



Figure 5-4 



Figure 5-4. Two banks of SIMM sockets are located on 
the logic board and are labeled Bank A and Bank B. 
Each bank contains four slots. When installing SIMMs, 
the following rules apply: 






• All four slots within a bank must be filled with 
SIMMs of the same RAM size. 

• A bank cannot be partially filled; all four slots of a 
bank must be filled or left empty. 



• If different size SIMMs are being used, the larger 
SIMMs must be in Bank A. 

• Bank A must be filled before Bank B. 

The following chart summarizes the configurations that 
the Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx support: 





Macintosh n and nx 


Macintosh Ilfx 


RAM 


Bank A BankB 


Bank A 


BankB 


1 MB 


Four 256K Empty 


NA 


NA 


2 MB 


Four 256K Four 256K 


NA 


NA 


4 MB 


Four 1 MB Empty 


Four 1 MB 


Empty 


5 MB 


Four 1 MB Four 256K 


NA 


NA 


8 MB 


Four 1 MB Four 1 MB 


Four 1 MB 


Four 1 MB 




CAUTION: Other configurations, such as a single SIMM 




or a pair of differently sized SIMMs, will not function 




correctly. 






Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 


rev. Mar 91 


Additional Procedures / 5.11 



□ LOGIC BOARD UPGRADES 



I 



The Macintosh IIx and Macintosh Ilfx Logic Board 
Upgrade Kits are available to Macintosh II and 
Macintosh IIx owners. These upgrade kits convert a 
Macintosh II to a Macintosh IIx or a Macintosh II or IIx 
to a Macintosh Ilfx, respectively. In addition to a new 
logic board, the kits also include an identification decal 
that should be affixed to the bottom cover of the 
upgraded system. Refer to Section 2, Take-Apart, to 
replace the logic board. 



Macintosh IIx Logic 
Board Upgrade 



The Macintosh IIx Logic Board Upgrade Kit converts a 
Macintosh II to a Macintosh IIx. 



Materials Required 



Macintosh IIx Logic Board Upgrade Kit 
#2 Phillips screwdriver 



Procedure 



1. Remove the Macintosh II logic board . 



Note: Instructions for returning the Macintosh II 
logic board are included in the upgrade kit. 

2. Install the Macintosh IIx logic board . 

3. Refer to Section 5, Additional Procedures, "Logic 
Board RAM Identification and Upgrades" for RAM 
SIMM installation procedures. 

4. Install the identification decal on the bottom cover 
as shown in Figure 5-5. 






►® Macintosh^ lx 

Apple Computer, Inc. 
Cupertino, California 

Made in U.S.A. 
Model No.: M5840 



A/--N Lis 



Listed 

EDP Equipment 

TO 
100-240 V ~ 
50-60 Hz 
6A 



| FCC ID: BCG9GRM5840 

Certified to comply wit) Class B limits, 
Part 15 of FCC Rules. See instuctions 
if interference to radio reception 
is suspected. 



Figure 5-5 



5.12 / Additional Procedures 



rev. May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Macintosh lifx 
Logic Board 
Upgrade 



The Macintosh lifx Logic Board Upgrade Kit converts a 
Macintosh II or IIx to a Macintosh lifx. 



Materials Required 



Macintosh lifx Logic Board Upgrade Kit 
#2 Phillips screwdriver 



Procedure 



1. Remove the Macintosh II or IIx logic board . Be sure 
to keep the on/off button and EMI fence for 
installation on the new logic board. 

Note: Instructions for returning the old logic board 
are included in the upgrade kit. 

2. If an upgrade is being performed on a system with 
an internal SCSI hard disk, remove the power cable 
connected to the hard disk and replace it with the 
one provided in the upgrade kit. 

3. Install the Macintosh Hfx logic board . 

4. Refer to Section 5, Additional Procedures, 
"Macintosh lifx — SCSI Termination" for SCSI 
termination options. 

5. Refer to Section 5, Additional Procedures, "Logic 
Board RAM Identification and Upgrades" for RAM 
SIMM installation procedures. 

6. Refer to Section 1, Basics, "System Software" for 
Macintosh system software 6.0.5 installation 
procedures. 

7. Install the identification decal shown in Figure 5-6, 
on the bottom cover. 



^(® Macintosh flfx 

Apple Computer, Inc. 
Cupertino, California 

Made in U.S.A. 
Model No.: M5525 



Listed 

EDP Equipment 

61 TO 

100-240 V rv 

50-60 Hz 

6A 

FCC ID: BCG5525 

Certified to comply with Class B Hmlts, 
Part 15 of FCC Rules. See Instructions 
K Interference to radio reception 
Is suspected. 



Figure 5-6 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Jul 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.13 



□ MACINTOSH II 

Paged Memory 
Management Unit 
Upgrade 



The 68851 Paged Memory Management Unit (PMMU) 
replaces the HMMU on the Macintosh II logic board. 
This upgrade is required to run Apple A/UX. The 
PMMU supports both 32-bit and 24-bit address modes 
and can run both Apple A/UX and the Macintosh 
operating system. 



. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench and wriststrap 
Small flat-blade screwdriver 
Phillips screwdriver 



Installation 



1. Remove the top cover and the drive mount from the 
Macintosh II . 



2. Figure 5-7. Locate the HMMU. Use the small flat- 
blade screwdriver to pry gently along the sides of 
the chip to remove the HMMU from the socket. 

CAUTION: Before pressing the new memory 
management unit into the socket, verify that the IC is 
positioned correctly! 

3. Figure 5-7. With the front of the Macintosh II 
facing you, position the PMMU so that the line on 
its surface is facing the lower-right corner of the 
board. 

4. Line up the pins in the socket and gently press the 
PMMU into the socket. 



-tfB& 



?& 



oa 



J&^.o DDDDD §0 « 




HMMU/ 
^PMMU 
Chip 



Figure 5-7 



5.14 / Additional Procedures 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






FDHD SuperDrive 
Upgrade 



The FDHD SuperDrive is available to Macintosh II 
owners. To upgrade a Macintosh II so it can support the 
FDHD drive, you must install a Macintosh II Apple 
FDHD Upgrade Kit. 

The upgrade involves replacing the original four ROMs 
with the revised 512K ROMs, and the IWM chip with 
the SWIM chip. The 800K disk drive remains in the 
system as drive 1 or 2, and the FDHD drive mechanism 
is added. 

IMPORTANT: The FDHD SuperDrive requires that 
system software must be version 6.0.2 or higher. If the 
software is lower than 6.0, the drive will be recognized as 
an 800K drive. To correct this problem, run the System 
Installer (version 6.0.2 or higher) to upgrade the system 
software. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench and wriststrap 
Macintosh II Apple FDHD Upgrade Kit 
#2 Phillips screwdriver 
IWM/SWIM extraction tool 
IC extractor 



Installation 



1. Place the Macintosh II on the grounded workbench 
pad and put on your grounding wriststrap. 



2. Remove the Macintosh II drive mount . 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Mar 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.15 



I 



MED HI 




IWMChip 



MEDLO 




B 



J V 



^ r. 



D 



A 




• 




Figure 5-8 



5.16 / Additional Procedures 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



3. Figure 5-8A. Locate the four ROMs. Using the IC 
extractor, remove the ROMs from the logic board. 

4. Figure 5-8A. Use the following chart to install the 
four revised 512K ROMs: 

ROM Part Numbe r Location 

HI 342-0639 C13 

MED HI 342-0640 C12 

MED LO 342-0641 E13 

LO 342-0642 El 2 

Note: The notch at the end of each ROM should face 
the front of the logic board. 

5. Figure 5-8A and B. Locate the IWM chip. Insert the 
two notched edges of the IWM/SWIM extractor into 
the small openings on two corners of the chip. 
Squeeze the handles and pull the IWM chip straight 
up. 

CAUTION: Before pressing the new SWIM chip into the 
socket, verify that the chip is positioned correctly! 

6. Figure 5-8C. With the computer facing you, position 
the SWIM chip so that the beveled edge with the 
dot is facing the power supply (or align the beveled 
edge of the SWIM chip with the white dot on the 
logic board beside the socket). Align the pins in 
the socket and gently press straight down on the 
SWIM chip until it is seated in the socket. 

7. Install the FDHD SuperDrive onto the drive mount 
as drive 1 or drive 2 . 

8. Install the drive mount and replace the top cover . 

9. Place the 1.4 MB label and 800K label in the 
appropriate positions on the front of the Macintosh 
II cover. If the 1.4 MB drive is in the left-drive 
position, and the 800K drive is in the right-drive 
position, place the labels as shown in Figure 5-8D. 

10. Be sure the system software is version 6.0.2 or 
later. 

11. Run MacTest II/IIx to ensure that the upgrade is 
installed and functioning correctly. Refer to 
Section 3, Diagnostics, for further information. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx rev. Mar 91 Additional Procedures / 5.1 7 



□ MACINTOSH llfx 



SCSI Termination 



A feature of the Macintosh llfx is the ability to transfer 
data to and from SCSI devices faster than earlier 
Macintosh computers. As a result of this increased 
transfer rate, Apple has found it necessary to modify 
the termination characteristics of the SCSI interface. 
These termination changes are implemented utilizing 
three new parts: 

Apple SCSI Cable Terminator n - This is a revised 
version of the present external SCSI cable terminator. 
Using a SCSI Cable Terminator II provides the proper 
termination required for external SCSI devices attached 
to a Macintosh llfx. Rules for where and when to 
install the terminator are identical to the original SCSI 
terminator. The terminators can be distinguished from 
each other by looking at the plastic around the 
connector contacts. On the new terminator the plastic, 
is black. On the original terminator, the plastic is blue. 

CAUTION: Never connect more than one Cable 
Terminator or Cable Terminator II on a SCSI daisy-chain. 
Connecting more than one terminator can cause damage 
to the computer. 

Internal SCSI Termination Block - Provides internal 
SCSI termination for systems without an internal SCSI 
hard disk. All finished-goods Macintosh llfx computers 
shipped without internal SCSI hard drives have the 
filter attached to the logic board SCSI connector. This 
termination block is removed when an internal SCSI 
hard disk is present. 

Internal SCSI Filter - Provides the proper termination 
capacitance required for third-party drives and Apple 
internal hard drives that shipped from Apple before 
March 19, 1990. The SCSI filter is connected between 
the SCSI signal cable and the mating connector on the 
hard drive. All finished goods Macintosh llfx 
computers shipped without internal SCSI hard drives 
have the filter attached to the logic board SCSI 
connector. 

Note: The SCSI filter must be connected to the drive to 
function correctly. Connecting the filter at the logic 
board will cause SCSI failures. 






5.18 / Additional Procedures 



May 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



Symptoms of 
Incorrect Termination 



A Macintosh Ilfx system that has an incorrect 
combination of internal and external SCSI termination 
may exhibit one or more of the following symptoms: 

• System fails to boot 

• System hangs while accessing a SCSI device 

• Data is lost or corrupted 

• One or more SCSI hard drives fail to appear on the 
desktop when the system is turned on 



Third-party External 
SCSI devices 



Some external third-party SCSI devices have built-in 
termination. If the device has built-in termination, it 
must be disabled and the SCSI Cable Terminator II used. 



Summary 



The internal SCSI terminator is needed only on systems 
with no internal SCSI hard disk. 



Install an internal SCSI filter when using a SCSI hard 
disk shipped from Apple before March 19, 1990 or in 
system with no internal SCSI hard disk. 

Install a SCSI Cable Terminator II when one or more 
external SCSI devices is attached to a Macintosh Ilfx. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



May 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.19 



ft Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 

Illustrated Parts List 



□ CONTENTS 



IPL.3 Macintosh II / IIx / Ilfx — System Exploded View 

(Figure 1) 
IPL.5 Macintosh II — Logic Board (Figure 2) 
IPL.7 Macintosh IIx — Logic Board (Figure 3) 
IPL.9 Macintosh Ilfx — Logic Board (Figure 4) 
IPL.ll Macintosh Ilfx — Logic Board with Parity 

(Figure 5) 



The figures and lists in this section include all piece 
parts that can be purchased separately from Apple for the 
Macintosh II, IIx, and Ilfx computers, along with their 
part numbers. All ADB input devices for these computers 
now have their own section. Please refer to Macintosh 
Family, Volume Four, for these parts. These are the only 
parts available from Apple. Refer to your Apple Service 
Programs manual for prices. 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.1 




I 



IPL.2 / Illustrated Parts List 



FIGURE 1 

rev. Oct 90 



■ 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






□ MACINTOSH ll/llx/llfx-^SYSTEM EXPLODED VIEW (Figure 1) 

Item Part No. Description 



1 630-5229 Top Cover and Latch Assembly 

2 462-4100 Screws, M 3.5 x .6 x 8, PNCRS Rec 

3 590-0566 Cable, Internal Hard Disk 

4 661-0373 HDA, 3.5, 20 MB, SCSI, Rev. A 
661-0391 HDA, 5.25, 40 MB, SCSI 
661-0464 HDA, 3.5, 40 MB, SCSI 
661-0411 HDA, 5.25, 80 MB, SCSI 

661-0457 HDA, 80 MB, 5.25 SCSI with A/UX, v.1.0 

661-0561 HDA, 80 MB, 3.5 SCSI with A/UX, v.1.1 (replaced by 

661-0613) 

661-0600 HDA, 80 MB, 3.5 SCSI 

661-0601 HDA, 5.25, 160 MB, SCSI 

661-0612 HDA, 3.5, 20 MB, SCSI, Rev. B 

661-0613 HDA, 80 MB, 3.5 SCSI with A/UX, v.2.0 

5 805-5051 Frame, HDA, Internal, 5.25, SCSI 
805-5066 Frame, HDA, Internal, 3.5, SCSI 

6 805-5050 Metal Housing/Shipping Fixture, 

800K/FDHD/SuperDrive (for transporting) 

7 661-0375 Power Supply, Macintosh II/IIx 
661-0542 Power Supply, Macintosh Ilfx 

8 805-5070 EMI Fence 

9 815-6237 On/Off Button 

10 661-0528 Logic Board, Macintosh II (without RAM; replaces part 

number 661-0374) 

661-0529 Logic Board, Macintosh IIx (without RAM; replaces part 

number 661-0463) 

661-0522 Logic Board, Macintosh Ilfx (without RAM) 

661-0592 Logic Board, Parity, Macintosh Ilfx (without RAM) 

11 590-0380 Cable, Power AC (smoke) 

12 630-5227 Macintosh II Bottom Cover Assembly 
630-5494 Macintosh IIx Bottom Cover Assembly 
630-5806 Macintosh Ilfx Bottom Cover Assembly 

13 815-6024 Reset/Interrupt Switch 

14 630-5222 Speaker 

15 805-5062 Drive Carrier 

16 003-0003 Packing Disk, 2-Sided (for transporting 800K 

Mechanisms) 

17 661-0345 800K Mechanism, Apple 3.5 Drive 
661-0474 Apple FDHD/SuperDrive 

18 462-3401 Screw, M 3x6, with two washers 

19 590-0188 Cable, 3.5 Internal Drive (red or yellow stripe) 

20 590-0505 Cable, Internal Hard Disk Power, Macintosh II/IIx 
590-0512 Cable, Internal Hard Disk Power (2x2 pin), Mac Ilfx 

21 630-5302 Assembly, Disk Slot Plug 

590-0705 Apple SCSI Cable Terminator II, Mac Ilfx, Black 

Macintosh ll/llx/llfx rev. Mar 91 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.3 







IPL.4 / Illustrated Parts List 



Mar 90 



Macintosh II /llx/llfx 



□ MACINTOSH II— 1 


LOGIC BOARD (Figure 2) 


Item 


Part No. 


Description 





661-0528 


Logic Board 


i 


600-0530 


Battery Holder Board 


2 


742-0011 


Lithium Battery (without leads) (replaces part number 
742-0009) 


3 


462-4100 


Screws 


4 


661-0402 


SIMM, 256K, 120 ns 




661-0494 


SIMM, DIP, 256K, 120 ns 




661-0403 


SIMM, SOJ, 1 MB, 120 ns 




661-0410 


SIMM, DIP, 1 MB, 120 ns 


5 


661-0640 


ROM, Med High, Macintosh II FDHD Upgrade 




342-0106 


IC, ROM, 512K, Med High 


6 


661-0639 


ROM, High, Macintosh II FDHD Upgrade 




342-0105 


IC, ROM, 512K, High 


7 


661-0642 


ROM, Low, Macintosh II FDHD Upgrade 




342-0108 


IC, ROM, 512K, Low 


8 


661-0641 


ROM, Med Low, Macintosh II FDHD Upgrade 




342-0107 


IC, ROM, 512K, Med Low 


9 


343-0002 


IC, HMMU 




630-8221 


IC, PMMU* 


10 


344S0043 


IC, IWM 




344S0062 


IC, SWIM 



included in the PMMU Upgrade 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 



rev. Oct 90 



Illustrated Parts List/ 1 PL.5 



I 



ru 




&mjw»u»mio4-04 1 



^ — ■HHHHHH-H 



FIGURE 3 






IPL.6/ Illustrated Parts List 



Mar 90 



Madrrtosh II / llx / llfx 






□ MACINTOSH llx- 


-LOGIC BOARD (Figure 3) 


Item 


Part No. 


Description 





661-0529 


Logic Board 


i 


600-0530 


Battery Holder Board 


2 


742-0011 


Lithium Battery (without leads) (replacing part number 
742-0009) 


3 


462-4100 


Screws 


4 


661-0402 


SIMM, 256K, 120 ns 




661-0494 


SIMM, DIP, 256K, 120 ns 




661-0403 


SIMM, SOJ, 1 MB, 120 ns 




661-0410 


SIMM, DIP, 1 MB, 120 ns 






Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.7 



I 



n_r 



n H H 1 f 1 



a. 



+n — iu 



a n © 
■ n 1 1 1 1 1 ■■■ i i ■ 




FIGURE 4 



IPL.8 / Illustrated Parts List 



Mar 90 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx 






□ MACINTOSH llfx— LOGIC BOARD (Figure 4) 

Item Part No. Description 

661-0522 Logic Board 

1 590-4515 Internal SCSI Termination Block 

2 590-4516 Internal SCSI Filter 

3 520-0344 Battery Holder Cover 

4 742-0011 Lithium Battery (without leads) 

5 661-0548 SIMM, 1 MB, SOJ, 80 ns, 64 pin 
661-0549 SIMM, 1 MB, SOJ, 60 ns, 64 pin, Parity 



Note: Items 1 and 2 ship only with Macintosh 
llfx systems without hard drives. 






Macintosh ll/llx/llfx rev. Apr 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.9 



D © 




FIGURES 



IPL10/ Illustrated Parts List 



Mar 90 



Macintosh II /llx/llfx 



□ MACINTOSH llfx— LOGIC BOARD WITH PARITY (Figure 5) 
Item Part No. Description 

661-0592 Logic Board with Parity 

1 520-0344 Battery Holder Cover 

2 742-0011 Lithium Battery (without leads) 

3 661-0549 SIMM, 1 MB, SOJ, 60 ns, 64 pin, Parity 



Macintosh ll/llx/llfx Mar 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.1 1 



« Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Ilex 

Technical Procedures 



□ TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Section 1 - 


1.3 


Product Description 


Basics 


1.3 


New Features 




1.3 


Macintosh Ilex Configurations 




1.5 


Connector Identification 




1.5 


Back Panel 




1.6 


Internal Connectors 




1.7 


Module Identification 




1.8 


Macintosh Ilex System Features 




1.8 


Macintosh Ilex Logic Board 




1.10 


Apple FDHD Drive 




1.13 


Specifications 




1.15 


Theory of Operation 




1.15 


Introduction 




1.15 


System Startup 




1.16 


Logic Board 




1.17 


Input/Output Interface 




1.20 


Real-Time Clock 




1.20 


Apple Desktop Bus 




1.21 


NuBus Interface 




1.23 


Power Control 




1.23 


Power Supply 




1.24 


Internal Floppy Disk Drives 




1.24 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 


Section 2 - 


2.2 


Electrostatic Discharge Prevention 


Take-Apart 


2.3 


Top Lid 




2.4 


Interface Cards 




2.5 


Speaker Bracket and Speaker 




2.£ 


Power Supply 




2.10 


Fan Bracket and Fan 




2.12 


Hard Disk Drive 




2.16 


Disk Drive Carrier and Floppy Disk Drive 




2.21 


Reset / Interrupt Switch 




2.22 


Main Logic Board 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Nov 90 



Contents / i 



Section 3 - 
Diagnostics 



3.2 Introduction to MacTest Ilcx/IIci 

3.3 Copying the Disk 

3.3 Using Your Backup Disk 

3.4 Running MacTest Ilcx/IIci 

3.4 Starting MacTest Ilcx/IIci 

3.5 Helpful Startup Information 

3.6 Installing the Loopbacks 

3.7 Using the MacTest Ilcx/IIci Menus 
3.12 Running the Tests 

3.14 Diagnostic Sound Sampler 
3.14 Introduction 

3.14 Procedure 

3.15 Introduction to AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci 

3.16 Running AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci 

3.16 Setting Up the Test Station and UUT 

3.19 Establishing Communication 

3.20 Using the AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci Menus 
3.22 Running the Tests 

3.24 Helpful Suggestions 

3.25 SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure 

3.25 Determining If a Jumper Is Needed 

3.26 External Jumpers on Old Cards 
3.26 Summary 

3.26 Installing the Jumper 






Section 4 - 
Troubleshooting 



4.3 Introduction 
4.3 General Information 

4.3 Before You Start 

4.3 Error Chords 

4.3 How to Use the Symptom Charts 

4.4 How to Use the Troubleshooting Flowcharts 

4.5 Things to Remember 

4.7 Module Exchange Information 
4.7 Logic Board Configuration 

4.7 Internal Hard Disk SCSI 

4.8 Startup and Error Chords 
4.8 Introduction 

4.8 Startup Chord 

4.8 Error Chords 

4.9 Summary 
4.11 Symptom Chart 

4.11 Video Problems 

4.12 Drive Problems 

4.12 SCSI Problems 

4.13 Peripheral Problems 

4.14 Miscellaneous Problems 



ii / Contents 



rev. Nov 90 



Macintosh Ilex 






4.16 Macintosh Ilex Flowcharts 

4.16 Flowchart 1 Notes 

4.18 Flowchart 2 Notes 

4.20 Flowchart 3 Notes 

4.22 Flowchart 4 Notes 

4.24 Flowchart 5 Notes 

4.26 SIMM Verification 

4.26 Introduction 

4.26 Isolating to the Customer's SIMMs 

4.27 Verification 

4.28 Verification Flowchart Notes 
4.30 Battery Verification 

4.30 Introduction 

4.30 Verification Procedure 



Section 5 - 

Additional 

Procedures 



5.3 Battery Replacement 

5.3 Storage and Handling 

5.3 Disposal 

5.6 Logic Board RAM Identification and Upgrades 

5.6 Introduction 

5.6 Identification 

5.9 Upgrades 

5.10 Macintosh Ilex Upgrade to Macintosh Ilci 



Illustrated 
Parts List 



IPL.3 Macintosh Ilex — System Exploded View 

(Figure 1) 
IPL.5 Macintosh Ilex — Logic Board (Figure 2) 






Note: The labels FDHD and FDHD/SuperDrive refer to 
the same product. 



©Apple Computer, Inc., 1989, 1990. No portion of this document may be reproduced in any form 

without the written permission of Apple Computer, Inc. 
MacTest, FDHD, Apple Desktop Bus, and SuperDrive are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 
Macintosh, A/UX, AppleTalk, Apple, AppleCAT, EtherTalk, and the Apple logo are registered 

trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 
UNIX® is a registered trademark of AT&T Information Systems. 
NuBus™ is a trademark of Texas Instruments. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Nov 90 



Contents / iii 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Ilex 

Section 1 - Basics 



□ CONTENTS 








1.3 


Product Description 




1.3 


New Features 




1.3 


Macintosh Ilex Configurations 




1.5 


Connector Identification 




1.5 


Back Panel 




1.6 


Internal Connectors 




1.7 


Module Identification 




1.8 


Macintosh Ilex System Features 




1.8 


Macintosh Ilex Logic Board 




1.10 


Apple FDHD Drive 




1.13 


Specifications 




1.15 


Theory of Operation 




1.15 


Introduction 




1.15 


System Startup 




1.16 


Logic Board 




1.17 


Input/Output Interface 




1.20 


Real-Time Clock 




1.20 


Apple Desktop Bus 




1.21 


NuBus Interface 




1:23 


Power Control 




1.23 


Power Supply 




1.24 


Internal Floppy Disk Drives 




1.24 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Basics/ 1.1 



□ PRODUCT DESCRIPTION 



The Macintosh® Ilex is a high-performance, open- 
architecture Macintosh computer. It is designed to run 
existing software while providing the power, 
flexibility, and expandability necessary for future 
applications. 



New Features 



The Macintosh Ilex has the following features: 



Increased speed (true 32-bit support) 

More RAM capacity (up to 128 MB) 

3 NuBus™ expansion slots (supports full 32-bit 

address and data 

Flexible video monitor options (on NuBus card) 

Compatibility with previous Macintosh systems 

Compatibility with alternative operating systems 

ROM expansion capabilities (SIMM socket) 

Numeric coprocessor for floating-point computations 

Locking power switch (easier use as file server) 



Macintosh Hex 
Configurations 



The Macintosh Ilex comes in a variety of different 
configurations. Below are four configurations that are 
offered. These are not the only possible configurations. 
Because of the flexibility of this unit, you may see 
units with different amounts of RAM and with other 
SCSI 3.5-inch hard disk drives. Presented here are 
basic configurations and some of the limitations: 



Floppy-Only 
Systems 



The floppy-only system includes the following elements: 

• 1 megabyte (MB) of RAM 

• One Apple FDHD drive 

(Floppy Disk High Density, Apple FDHD drive) 



Hard Disk Systems 



The hard disk systems include the following elements: 



The 1 MB system with a 40 MB HDA: 

• 1 MB of RAM 

• One Apple FDHD drive 

(Floppy Disk High Density, 1.4 MB Drive) 

• 40 MB SCSI internal hard disk 

...Continued on next page 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Basics / 1 .3 



The 4 MB system with an 80 MB HDA: 

• 4 MB of RAM 

• One Apple FDHD drive 

(Floppy Disk High Density, 1.4 MB Drive) 

• 80 MB SCSI internal hard disk 

The 4 MB system with A/UK®: 

• 4 MB of RAM 

• One Apple FDHD drive 

(Floppy Disk High Density, 1.4 MB Drive) 

• 80 MB SCSI + A/UX (Apple UNIX®) on a special 
internal hard disk 



Enhancements The following enhancements can be added to any of the 

systems: 

• 800K, 3.5-inch external disk drive 

(the Macintosh Ilex will not support an 800K 
internal drive, or the HD20, or any 400K drives) 

• 1 to 8 MB of RAM (up to 128 MB when larger 
DRAMs become available) 

• Any Apple 20-, 40-, or 80 MB (or larger, within 
limits) 3.5-inch internal SCSI hard disk drive 

• Up to 6 external SCSI devices of any size or 
kind 



IMPORTANT: To maintain system functionality, A/UX 
customers planning to use the Macintosh Ilex and/or Apple 
FDHD drive must upgrade A/UX software to at least 
version 1.0.1. 



1 .4 / Basics Mar 89 Macintosh Ilex 



□ CONNECTOR IDENTIFICATION 



Back 
Panel 



The back panel of the Macintosh Ilex has seven built-in 
ports and two connectors, as listed below. The number 
beside the item below corresponds to the numbered 
arrow in Figure 1. 



1. Apple Desktop Bus™ 1 and 2 

2. Stereo sound port 

3. Serial port 2 (modem) 

4. Serial port 1 (printer or AppleTalk® only) 

5. SCSI port 

6. External disk drive connector 

7. Locking power switch 

8. AC power connector 

9. Switched (courtesy) monitor connector 




FIGURE 1 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Mar 89 



Basics / 1 .5 



Internal 
Connectors 



There are eight connectors and one jumper on the 
Macintosh Ilex logic board. In the list below, the 
number beside the connector name corresponds to the 
numbered arrow in Figure 2. 



1. Power supply connector for the logic board 

2. Internal SCSI connector 

3. Power connector for internal SCSI 

4. Internal disk drive connector 

5. RAM SIMMs connectors 

6. Speaker connector 

7. ROM jumper 

8. NuBus slots 

9. ROM SIMM connector 




FIGURE 2 



1 .6 / Basics 



rev. Oct 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






□ MODULE IDENTIFICATION 




FIGURE 3 

Module Components 



1. Top lid 8. 

2. Fan bracket 9. 

3. Fan 10. 

4. Power supply 11. 

5. Logic board 12. 

6. Outer case 13. 

7. Power lamp lens 14. 



Diode light assembly 
Programmers switch 
Floppy disk 
Speaker 

Speaker bracket 
Disk carrier 
Hard disk 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Basics / 1 .7 



□ MACINTOSH Ilex SYSTEM FEATURES 



The Macintosh Ilex is a high-end Macintosh II that 
includes the following new or upgraded components: 

• Motorola 68030 microprocessor 

• 68882 floating-point coprocessor 

• Apple FDHD (Floppy Disk High Density) drive 

• ROM SIMM 

• SWIM chip 



Macintosh Ilex At the heart of the Macintosh Ilex is the Motorola 

Logic Board 68030 microprocessor (Figure 4, #1). The 68030 is a 

true 32-bit microprocessor that is fully compatible with 
earlier 16- and 24-bit Macintosh microprocessors. This 
high-performance microprocessor runs at 15.6672 MHz 
and is designed to handle paged memory management, 
thereby eliminating the HMMU (or PMMU). 

The Macintosh Ilex logic board includes a 28-pin DIP 
soldered-in ROM (Read-Only Memory) (Figure 4, #2). 
It also contains a 64-pin SIMM (Single In-line Memory 
Module) socket (Figure 4, #3) that will allow for 
future ROM upgrades to the Macintosh Ilex without 
changing the main logic board. These ROM chips 
include code that supports the Apple FDHD drive and 
the SWIM disk controller chip. The SWIM chip (Figure 
4, #4) enables the Apple FDHD drive to read and write 
both GCR (Group-Coded Recording) and MFM (Modified 
Frequency Modulation) data formats. 

Note: When a new ROM SIMM is installed, the 
existing DIP ROM will not have to be removed from 
the board. For the new ROM to be recognized, it will 
just be a matter of removing a jumper (Figure 4, #5) on 
the logic board. 






1 .8 / Basics Mar 89 Macintosh Ilex 




FIGURE 4 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Mar 89 



Basics / 1 .9 



Apple FDHD 
Drive 



The Apple FDHD drive is a high-density (1.4 MB), 3.5- 
inch disk drive for the Macintosh Ilex system. In 
addition to high-capacity data storage, the Apple FDHD 
drive provides data exchangeability between Apple 
(GCR data format) and MS-DOS (MFM data format) 
systems. The APPLE FDHD DRIVEis also fully 
backward-compatible with the current 400K and 800K 
disk formats. 



i 



Identification 



The Apple FDHD drive cannot be distinguished from 
400K and 800K format disk drives. However, since the 
Apple FDHD drive is the only drive supported 
internally, you should not have any problem. If for 
some reason you suspect that an 800K drive has been 
installed internally, you can tell the difference by 
removing the top lid and locating the microswitches 
(Figure 5, #1) at the front of the drive. The Apple 
FDHD drive has three microswitches; the 800K drives 
have only two microswitches. 




FIGURES 

You can also identify an Apple FDHD drive by removing 
it from the Macintosh Ilex and checking the 
manufacturer's label (Figure 6) on the bottom of the 
drive: "2MB" has been added to the label on all high- 
density drives. 



1.10 /Basics 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 




FIGURE 6 



CAUTION: High -density media are more likely to have 
problems than low-density media. To avoid media-related 
problems, use only known-good media or high-density 
media bearing the Apple label. 



High-Density 



The Apple FDHD drive can read, write, and format 400K 
and 800K media data disks. However, special high- 
density, 3.5-inch diskettes that take full advantage of 
the increased capacity of the Apple FDHD drive are also 
available. To avoid media-related problems when using 
the Apple FDHD drive, Apple advises using high- 
density media bearing the Apple label. 



...Continued on next page 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Basics/ 1.11 



As shown in the drive and media compatibility matrix 
(Figure 7), 400K drives can read, write, and format both 
single-sided media and double-sided media (in 400K 
format only). The 800K drives can also read, write, and 
format both single- and double-sided media. However, 
Apple does not recommend using high-density media in 
either 400K or 800K disk drives. Data saved to high- 
density media using 400K or 800K drives is unreliable 
and could be lost later. The Apple FDHD drives can 
read, write, and format single-sided, double-sided, and 
high-density media. In addition, Apple FDHD drives can 
read and write 720K and 1.4 MB double-sided IBM 
(MFM) format media. 



i 



Drive 


Media 


FORMAT 


400K(GCR) 


800K(GCR) 


720K (MFM) 


1.4 MB (MFM) 


400K 
400K 
400K 


Single-Sided 
Double-Sided 
High-Density 


R/W/F 

R/W/F 

NR 


X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 


800K 
800K 
800K 


Single-Sided 

Double-Sided 

High-Density 


R/W/F 

R/W/F 

NR 


NR 

R/W/F 

NR 


X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 


FDHD 
FDHD 
FDHD 


Single-Sided 

Double-Sided 

High-Density 


R/W/F 
R/W/F 


NR 

R/W/F 

X 


X 

R/W/F 
X 


X 
X 

R/W/F 



LEGEND: 



R = 
W = 
F = 
X = 
NR = 



Read 

Write 

Format 

Not Allowed 

Not Recommended 



FIGURE 7 

Note: To help understand drive and media format 
compatibility, try thinking in terms of the drive/media 
of lowest capacity. For example, if your system has 
both an external 800K drive and an Apple FDHD drive, 
to ensure media format compatibility between the two 
drives you must use 800K media (the drive and media of 
lowest capacity). 



1.12 /Basics 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



□ SPECIFICATIONS 



Processor 



MC68030 CPU 



Clock frequency 
Addressing 



15.6672 MHz 



32-bit internal registers 
32-bit address bus 



Coprocessor 



Built-in MC68882 
Floating-Point Unit (FPU) 

Accepts optional coprocessor cards installed in NuBus 
expansion slots. 



ROM 



256 KB 



RAM 



1 MB expandable to 8 MB (expandable to 128 MB when 
SIMMs with higher-density DRAM chips become 
available); additional expandability through NuBus slots 



Slot expansion 



Three NuBus expansion slots 



Sound 



Apple Sound Chip (ASC) stereophonic (miniature phone 
plug) 



Disk drives 



Internal Apple FDHD drive 
External 3.5-inch 800K disk drive 



Hard disk 



SCSI hard disks (internal/external) 






SCSI 



SCSI port (DB-25) 



...Continued on next page 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Basics/ 1.13 



Serial ports 
Video display 



Two serial ports (Mini-8) 



Supports multiple external color and monochrome 
monitors connected through video cards in NuBus 
expansion slots 



i 



Keyboard 



Apple Keyboard or Apple Extended Keyboard connected 
through Apple Desktop Bus ports (Mini-4) 



Mouse 



Apple Desktop Bus mouse (Mini-4) 



1.14 /Basics 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



□ THEORY OF OPERATION 



Introduction 



The Macintosh Ilex computer is made up of four basic 
modules: the logic board, the power supply, the disk 
drives, and the video interface card. Internally, the 
computer will have one internal floppy disk drive and 
can have one internal SCSI hard disk. 



The information here will give you an understanding of 
how the Macintosh Ilex computer works. This 
understanding, in turn, will assist you in performing 
logical troubleshooting on this system. 



System 
Startup 






When the computer is turned on, the system begins a 
carefully synchronized sequence of events. First, the 
processor is held in a wait state while a series of 
circuits puts the system in a known state in preparation 
for operation. During this time, the Versatile Interface 
Adapters and the SWIM chip are initialized, and the 
mapping of RAM and ROM is altered temporarily in 
order to test the system. 

The software contained in the Read-Only Memory 
(ROM) then performs a RAM test to determine how 
much RAM is present in the machine and to verify the 
proper operation of that RAM. This information is then 
stored in a global variable, and several other system 
tests are performed. When the system is fully tested 
and initialized, system RAM is mapped for normal 
operation. 



At this point the disk startup process begins. The 
system looks for a readable disk in the available disk 
drives in the following order: 

1) Internal floppy disk drive 

2) External floppy disk drive 

3) Setup device set in the control panel 

4) SCSI devices in declining order of device ID 
(6 to 0) 

Note: If the battery is removed or the parameter 
RAM is destroyed, the setup device will default to the 
device with ID=0. 

Once a readable disk is found, it is read and the disk 
startup process is completed. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Jun 89 



Basics/ 1.15 



Logic Board 



The logic board is the heart of the system, the place 
where all processing of information takes place. What 
follows is a list of the major components of the 
Macintosh Ilex logic board and the functions they 
perform. 



. 



Microprocessors 



The Macintosh Ilex contains a 68030 microprocessor, 
which is a true 32-bit processor but also supports both 
24- and 16-bit processing modes. It runs at 15.6672 
MHz for high performance. When running in the 24-bit 
addressing mode, the Macintosh Ilex is compatible with 
the majority of existing Macintosh applications. 

When working in A/UX (Apple UNIX), the 68030 
microprocessor incorporates instruction sets for 
handling paged memory management, thereby 
eliminating the need for an HMMU or PMMU (as found 
in the Macintosh II). When data is sought from a memory 
location that isn't in the RAM, the 68030 swaps the page 
containing the data from the disk to the RAM. 

The 68882 numerics coprocessor in the Macintosh Ilex 
is a 64-pin grid array that uses the coprocessor 
interface of the 68030 to perform numeric computations 
in parallel with 68030 program execution. It provides a 
high degree of precision and speed for Macintosh 
programs. 



RAM 



The Random-Access Memory (RAM) is provided in 
packages known as Single In-Line Memory Modules 
(SIMMs). Each SIMM consists of a small printed circuit 
board with various configurations of dynamic RAM 
(DRAM) chips. On one edge of each SIMM is a contact 
that fits into the SIMM sockets located on the logic 
board. The RAM interface requires 120-ns-RAS-access- 
time DRAMs with CAS before RAS refresh. The amount 
of RAM on the logic board can be changed by installing 
same-size SIMMs in each of either Bank A or Bank B, 
with the larger RAM size in Bank A (the first four 
rows closest to the disk drive). 






1.16/ Basics 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



Various RAM configurations are possible, depending on 
the size of the DRAM chips and on how many SIMMs 
(installed in sets of four) are used. 

Every time the Macintosh Ilex is switched on, the 
system software performs a memory test to determine 
how much RAM is present in the machine. 



ROM 



The ROMs are the system's permanent Read-Only 
Memory. The Macintosh Ilex presently contains four 
64K x 8-bit ROM chips in 28-pin DIP packages 
(soldered), which form a 32-bit-wide data bus. This 
provides a total of 256K of ROM that contain the 
routines for the Toolbox, the operating system, and 
other necessary system routines. 

Also included on the logic board is a SIMM socket that 
will allow the Macintosh Ilex to use new ROM SIMMs 
when available, thus providing a simple method to 
upgrade the machine. 



Input /Output 
Interface 



The input/output interfaces of the system are the 
serial ports, controlled by the Serial Communications 
Controllers (SCO circuitry; the floppy disk, controlled 
by the SWIM circuitry; the SCSI devices, controlled by 
the Small Computer Standard Interface circuitry; and the 
stereo sound port, controlled by Apple Sound Chip 
circuitry. The numeric coprocessor and the VIA chips 
and associated circuitry are, to some extent, considered 
input/output devices; however, it should be recognized 
that they provide input/output to the processor. They 
do not have external ports as the system level 
input/output circuitry does. Each of these interfaces is 
designed to be upward-compatible with Macintosh 
systems. 



Versatile 

Interfaces 

Adapters 



The Macintosh Ilex contains two Versatile Interface 
Adapters (VTAs). These chips, known as VIA1 and VTA2, 
provide maximum compatibility with existing Macintosh 
software. VIA1 is configured to appear to the software 
as the VIA chip in 68000-based Macintosh, and the VIA2 
provides access to the new features in the Macintosh 
Ilex. 






...Continued on next page 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Basics/ 1.17 



VIA1, which is a 6522A chip, provides the system with 
most of the signals from the 68000-based Macintosh 
configuration. It also provides access to new features, 
including an Apple Desktop Bus interrupt and a 
synchronous modem signal. 

VIA2 provides control of the Fake Memory Mapping 
Unit, decodes the NuBus slot, SCSI, and the Digital 
Sound Chip interrupts; disables the 68030 instruction 
and data cache; switches the unit off; blocks NuBus 
accesses to RAM; and decodes errors that occur in 
NuBus transactions. 

The access time between the two VIA chips and the 
68030 is 500 ns. The internal frequency of the VIA is 
783.36 KHz. 



SWIM Chip 



The SWIM chip in the Macintosh Ilex replaces the IWM 
chip in the Macintosh II. The SWIM incorporates the 
functionality of the IWM and provides the capability to 
read, write, and format in both GCR (Apple) and MFM 
(MS-DOS and Apple high-density) data formats. The 
SWIM chip controls the one floppy disk drive internal 
to the unit and the one external floppy drive. In the 
Macintosh Ilex the SWIM uses a 15. 667-MHz clock 
when accessing the Apple FDHD drive and uses a 
divide-by-two circuit when accessing an 800K drive. 



Small Computer 

Standard 

Interface 



The Small Computer Standard Interface (SCSI) consists 
of an IC chip, an internal 50-pin connector, and an 
external DB-25 connector. The chip is connected 
directly to both connectors, and it controls the high- 
speed parallel port for communicating with up to seven 
SCSI peripherals. 



The Macintosh Ilex SCSI port differs from the industry 
SCSI standard in two ways: 

1. A DB-25 connector is used instead of the standard 
50-pin ribbon connector. An adapter is available to 
convert the connector to the standard. 



1.18 /Basics 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



Power for termination resistors is not provided. If 
the attached SCSI device does not have the required 
terminator resistor, an Apple-manufactured 
terminator block must be installed on the last 
device. 



Serial 

Communications 

Controller 



The two serial ports are controlled by the Serial 
Communications Controller (SCC). Port 1 can be 
programmed for asynchronous, synchronous, or 
AppleTalk protocols. Port 2 can be programmed for 
asynchronous operation. The serial ports conform to 
EIA standard RS422. These ports are used mainly for 
(though not limited to) connecting the Macintosh Ilex to 
networks, printers, and modems. 



The Macintosh Ilex uses two Mini-DIN 8 connectors 
(Figure 8) for the two ports. Both connectors are 
interfaced through two 26LS30 and two 75175 chips to 
the SCC. Each signal pin passes through an RC filter 
network. The ports provide an output handshake but do 
not provide the +5 and +12 volts found on the 
Macintosh 128K, 512K, and 512K Enhanced serial ports. 




FIGURE 8 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Basics/ 1.19 



Apple 
Sound Chip 



The Apple Sound Chip generates a stereo/audio signal. 
This signal is buffered by two additional chips that 
filter the Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) signal and 
drive the internal speaker or external stereo 
miniphone jack. 

The sound generation system in the Macintosh Ilex 
supports the previous Macintosh modes; it also offers a 
complete set of new ROM tools in the Software Sound 
Manager for performing sound generation. 



i 



Real-Time 
Clock 



The Macintosh Ilex real-time clock is a custom chip. It 
contains 256 bytes of RAM that are powered by a 
battery when external power is turned off. These RAM 
bytes are called parameter RAM. They store the 
configuration of ports, the clock setting, and other data 
that must be preserved even when the system power is 
not available. 



Apple 
Desktop Bus 



The Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) is a serial communication 
bus used to connect keyboards, mouse devices, graphic 
tablets, and other input devices to the system. The mini 
4-pin ADB connector (Figure 9) connects the devices to 
the Macintosh Ilex. 




Power 



DATA 



Male Cable 
(plug) 



Female PCB mount 
(back of machine) 



FIGURE 9 

The microprocessor normally samples the state of each 
device by using the control lines in VIA2 to read or 
write to the Apple Desktop Bus modem chip. 






1 .20 / Basics 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



All devices that are made for the Apple Desktop Bus 
have some kind of microprocessor that makes them 
intelligent devices. All ADB devices, except the mouse, 
have ports for connecting to other ADB devices. 
Because it has no port, the mouse must be the last 
device attached to the Apple Desktop Bus. 

There are two Macintosh Apple ADB keyboards-the 
Apple Keyboard and the Apple Extended Keyboard. 
Both keyboards connect to the Apple Desktop Bus port 
on the rear of the Macintosh Ilex. Both keyboards have 
their own microprocessors, which are called keyboard 
microcontrollers. The keyboards operate 
asynchronously, issuing commands on the ADB and 
transmitting and receiving data to and from the ADB 
devices. 



NuBuS The Macintosh Ilex has three expansion slots to support 

Interface Apple standard peripherals and increase RAM size. 

Each expansion slot is a 96-pin DIN connector that uses 

the NuBus interface to communicate with the system. 

The following are a few of the cards that will go into 

the NuBus slots: 

• Video cards 

• Extra RAM 

• Ethernet™ (and other networks) 

• Add-on SCSI port card 

The NuBus interface supports the following features for 
the Macintosh Ilex: 

• Geographic Addressing: Each of the three slots has 
a unique 4-bit value encoded into the slots, which 
eliminates the need for DIP switches or other means 
to uniquely address each card. 

• Distributed Arbitration: There is no central bus 
master or daisy chain to assign bus mastership. The 
bus mastership is performed with the geographic 
addresses, thus allowing a priority within a group 
of bus requesters but not an overriding control of 
the bus. In theory, all requesters will receive equal 
access to the bus over time. 

• Synchronous Transaction: All bus transactions are 
timed relative to a single asymmetric 10-MHz clock. 

...Continued on next page 



Macintosh Ilex rev. Mar 89 Basics / 1 .21 



• 32-bit Address/Data: The NuBus supports 4 GB of 
address with justified 8-bit, 1 6-bit, and 32-bit data 
transactions. The 68030 supports all these data 
types through the use of dynamic bus sizing. This 
means word and long-word operations do not have 
to be aligned but instead cause multiple NuBus 
transactions to perform the proper alignment. The 
data bus from the 68030 to NuBus is byte-reversed 
to allow sequential byte addresses to appear on the 
NuBus data ports in the same order as the NuBus 
address would imply. 

• Bus Timeout: The absence of a card on the NuBus 
will not hang the bus by waiting for a reply. A 
system resource will error out any transaction 
taking longer than 25.6 |xs. 

• Simple Interrupts: Each card has the ability to 
generate simple open-collector interrupts that allow 
inexpensive cards to gain system attention without 
having to become bus master. 

The NuBus has three major states of communication 
with the Macintosh Ilex system: 

• Processor to NuBus, which is activated whenever 
the microprocessor generates a physical slot 
address. If a device responds, the data is 
transferred. 

• NuBus to Processor Bus, which is for access to 
RAM, ROM, and I/O to and from NuBus. There are 
two control functions being performed for this 
process. One tracks the changes on NuBus, and the 
other lets the 68020/68030 tell NuBus what to do 
next. 

• NuBus time-out, which is required to prevent access 
to empty slots. Such access would hang the system. 

Every NuBus card should contain a ROM declaration 
that provides information to the operating system at 
startup. The ROM information ensures that drivers are 
properly installed and that the card is initialized and 
recognized by the system. 



1 .22 / Basics Mar 89 Macintosh Ilex 



Power 
Control 



The Macintosh Ilex has a Hard-ON/Soft-OFF circuit to 
control the power supply. The circuit is designed to 
control the power supply through the Power Fail 
Warning signal on NuBus. 

The circuit design attempts to turn on the power supply 
while the power switch is pressed (Hard-ON) and for 2 
seconds after the power switch is pressed. The Apple 
Desktop Bus keyboard has a secondary power switch 
that can turn on the unit. When the power switch is 
pressed, a capacitor is discharged through a resistor to 
activate the power-on circuitry. The capacitor gets its 
charge through a soft-power circuit that is active even 
when the computer is turned off. As long as AC current 
is present (the unit is plugged in), the power supply 
will turn on the computer within 2 seconds. 

This circuit works in conjunction with the new Locking 
Power Switch located on the rear of the unit. This 
switch can be locked in an ON position, which allows 
the unit to restart itself as soon as AC power is 
detected. In effect, if there is a power failure and the 
unit shuts off, the unit will start up as soon as the 
power is reinstated. If this switch is not in the ON 
position, the unit will not turn on until someone turns 
it on. This feature is most valuable when using the unit 
as a file server. 

The power-off function is under software control (Soft- 
OFF) by using the menu command Shut Down from the 
Special menu of the finder. This software control 
allows the computer to clean up any pending activity 
before switching off. The power-down switch 
generates a Hard-OFF that turns off the computer after 
2 ms without going through software. 



Power 
Supply 



The power supply operates on standard line voltage and 
outputs +5V, +12V, and -12V DC voltages, which are 
used by the logic board, the internal devices, and the 
slots. 






Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Basics/ 1.23 



Internal Floppy 
Disk Drives 



The internal disk drive connects to the main logic board 
through an internally installed connector. The flow of 
data between the logic board and the disk drives is 
channeled through the SWIM disk controller. The 
SWIM controls reading and writing operations. 



FDHD 
Drive 



The SWIM disk controller enables the Apple FDHD 
drive to exchange data between Apple and MS-DOS 
systems. The SWIM chip interprets, converts, and 
outputs dual-disk (clock/time) and file (data) signals as 
appropriate for either GCR (variable rotational speed) 
or MFM (constant rotational speed) formats. This 
arrangement provides the capability to read, write, and 
format Apple 400K and 800K data disks (GCR), MS-DOS 
720K data disks (MFM), and Apple or MS-DOS high- 
density (1.4 MB) data disks (MFM). 

An application-specific translator within the Apple File 
Exchange utility program, or provided by third parties, 
must be used to translate the formatted data for use 
within an application program. 



Internal Hard 
Disk SCSI 



The hard disk connects to the logic board through the 
internal SCSI connector. Other SCSI devices may be 
daisy-chained to the external SCSI port. 






1.24/ Basics 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Ilex 

Section 2 - Take-Apart 



□ CONTENTS 








2.2 


Electrostatic Discharge Prevention 




2.3 


Top Lid 




2.4 


Interface Cards 




2.5 


Speaker Bracket and Speaker 




2.8 


Power Supply 




2.10 


Fan Bracket and Fan 




2.12 


Hard Disk Drive 




2.16 


Disk Drive Carrier and Floppy Disk Drive 




2.21 


Reset / Interrupt Switch 




2.22 


Main Logic Board 



Note: If a step is underlined, detailed instructions for 
that step can be found elsewhere in the section. 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.1 



□ ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE PREVENTION 



I 



The Macintosh Ilex contains C-MOS components, and 
RAM memory is installed on small separate boards 
called SIMM (Single In-line Memory Modules) modules. 
Both the C-MOS components and the SIMM modules are 
very susceptible to damage from electrostatic discharge 
(ESD). 

Preventive measures must be taken to avoid ESD 
damage. When you are unwrapping, installing, or 
replacing any modules, observe the appropriate ESD 
precautions. 

For complete ESD prevention information, refer to You 
Oughta Know Technical Procedures. 

If the proper ESD procedures are not available, then do 
the following: 

Turn off the Macintosh Ilex power switch and 
disconnect the power cord. After removing the lid and 
before going near the logic board, touch the metal of 
the power supply case. 



2.2 /Take-Apart 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



□ TOP LID 



Materials Required 



Phillips screwdriver 



Remove 



1. Remove the AC power cable. 

2. Remove the Phillips screw at the top rear of the 
(Figure 1, #1). 




FIGURE 1 

3. Push up on the tabs on the back of the lid 

(Figure 1, #2) and lift up the lid from the back to 
the front until the lid comes off the front end. 



Replace 






1. Insert the front end of the lid onto the front end of 
the unit, making sure that the tabs on the lid fit into 
the receptacle on the unit. 

2. Swing the lid down toward the back of the unit, 
pressing down on the back until you hear a small 
click. 

3. Replace the Phillips screw on the rear of the unit 
(Figure 1, #1). 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Take- Apart / 2.3 



□ INTERFACE CARDS 



The following procedure can be used to remove or 
replace any interface or expansion card that is installed 
in the Macintosh Ilex. 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 

2. Touch the metal on the power supply case inside the 
computer to discharge any static electricity that 
might be on your body or clothing. 

CAUTION: If the computer has been on, let it cool for 5 
minutes before touching the power supply. 

3. Carefully grasp each end of the card and pull 
straight up to remove it. To put the least possible 
stress on the logic board, gently tilt the card 
forward and back while pulling upward. 

Note: When removing the card, pull up evenly on 
both sides of the card to avoid bending the 
connector pins. 



Replace 



1. Position the card so that the connector on the 

bottom of the card lines up with the slot. Align the 
card so that the metal guides at the top and bottom 
of the rear slot opening fit through the metal shield 
attached to the card. 



2. Place one hand on the card, directly over the 
connector area, and push down firmly until the 
connector is fully seated. 

CAUTION: Do not force the card If you meet a lot of 
resistance, remove the card and try again. 

3. Replace the top cover. 



2.4 /Take-Apart 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



□ SPEAKER BRACKET AND SPEAKER 



The speaker is secured in a speaker bracket that must 
be removed from the case before the speaker can be 
removed. 



Remove 



1. Remove the top lid . 



2. Find the speaker (Figure 2, #1) in the speaker 
bracket (Figure 2, #2) located at the front of the 
unit and pull out the two-wire connector going to 
the main logic board. 




FIGURE 2 

Gently lift up on the tab (Figure 2, #3) in the 
center of the bracket and at the same time pull back 
on the top of the speaker bracket until it comes 
loose from the bottom area. 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Take-Apart / 2.5 



CAUTION: In the next step, do not push on the heavy 
paper part of the speaker, or you will damage the speaker. 



I 



4. Gently push the speaker out of the bracket by 
applying force at the center of the rear of the 
speaker (Figure 3, #1). 




FIGURE 3 



Replace 



Line up the rear part (Figure 4, #1) of the speaker 
(the round metal part that sticks out on the back of 
the speaker) with the round hole in the speaker 
bracket. 



Make sure that the two wires (Figure 4, #2) from 
the speaker are protruding through one of the two 
openings on either side of the round hole on the 
bracket. 






2.6 /Take-Apart 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 




FIGURE 4 

3. Gently push the round metal part of the speaker 
into the round hole on the bracket until it stops 
going in and the rectangular front part of the 
speaker is embedded in the rectangular frame of the 
bracket (Figure 4, #3). 

4. With the speaker facing the front of the case, insert 
the bottom of the bracket at an angle so that the 
bottom back side of the bracket is at the edge of the 
logic board. 

5. Push the top of the bracket down and forward 
toward the front of the case. This action should 
wedge the bottom of the bracket between the edge 
of the logic board and the front of the case. 

6. Press the top of the bracket forward to make sure it 
is secured to the front of the case. 

7. Connect the two-wire speaker cable to the 2-pin 
connector (J7) on the logic board. 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Take-Apart / 2.7 



□ POWER SUPPLY 



I 



Remove 



1. Remove the AC power cable. 

2. Remove the tQp lid- 

3. Reach down and underneath the front right of the 
power supply (Figure 5, #1) where the disk drive 
carrier is touching the power supply, and find the 
tab (Figure 5, #2) that is latched to the bottom of 
the power supply. (This tab is part of the disk 
drive carrier unit.) 




FIGURE 5 



4. Using a finger, push the end of the tab toward the 
front of the case and at the same time lift up on the 
power supply. You will have to use some force to 
loosen the power supply, since you are pulling out a 
connector while you're lifting. If the power supply 
seems as if it won't move, make sure you are 
unlatching it correctly at the tab underneath. 

Once the power supply begins to move, it will come 
completely up and out of the case. 






2.8 /Take-Apart 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



Replace 



Line up the power supply correctly over the space 
on the logic board. Make sure that the two lips on 
the power supply case (Figure 6, #1) line up with 
the slot on the left side of the case and the slot on 
the back wall of the case (Figure 6, #2). 







FIGURE 6 

Note: Don't worry about the connector on the 
bottom of the power supply. This is a self-aligning 
connector that will go into the connector on the 
logic board, as long as you have properly aligned 
the power supply. 

Slide the power supply down into the case until you 
hear a click. If you don't get the click, you either 
did not align the case properly or the connector is 
not pushed in far enough. Lift out the supply and 
start over again. You must hear the click. 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Take-Apart / 2.9 



□ FAN BRACKET AND FAN 



I 



The fan and fan bracket are two separate units. To 
remove the fan, you must first remove the fan bracket. 



Remove 



1. Remove the power supply . 

2. Unlatch the two bracket latches (Figure 7, #1) that 
protrude from the bottom of the power supply by 
gently squeezing them together until they clear the 
metal tabs. As the tabs are released, push up on 
them so that the fan bracket starts to come out of 
the power supply case. 




FIGURE 7 

3. Pull out the bracket completely. 

4. When the bracket is completely out, unplug the 
connector that attaches to the printed circuit board 
inside the power supply case. 

5. On the fan side of the bracket (the side from which 
the wires exit), unlatch the two plastic tabs (one on 
each side of the fan) (Figure 8, #1) and push the fan 
out of the bracket. 



2.10 /Take- Apart 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 




FIGURE 8 



Replace 



1. Align the fan in the bracket so that the hub of the 
fan (with the wiring) goes into the bracket. This 
way the wires will be sticking out of the fan away 
from the bracket (Figure 8, #2). It is also important 
that the wire side be toward the bottom of the 
bracket. The large flat side (Figure 8, #3) of the 
bracket is the top. 



2. Start the fan bracket into the power supply. The 
wires should be facing toward the inside of the 
supply. Plug the 2-wire connector into the 
connector on the power supply logic board. 

Note: Make sure the fan wire is pushed back into 
the power supply to prevent the wire from hitting 
the blades. 

3. Push the bracket all the way down until the two 
latches protrude through the bottom of the power 
supply and engage the two metal tabs. 

4. Hand-spin the fan and listen to determine if the 
blades are hitting the wire. If they are, remove the 
fan bracket again and readjust the wire so it won't 
hit the fan blades. 

5. Replace the power supply . 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.11 



□ HARD DISK DRIVE 



The hard disk drive (Figure 9, # 1) is located in the top 
portion of the disk drive carrier unit (Figure 9, #2). 
The hard disk drive can be removed with or without 
removing the carrier unit. The following procedure 
describes how to remove the hard disk drive without 
removing the carrier unit. (The procedure for removing 
the carrier unit is explained later in these Take-Apart 
procedures.) 




FIGURE 9 



Remove 



1. Remove the top lid . 



2. Carefully pull out the 50-pin connector from the 
back of the hard disk drive (Figure 9, #3). 

3. Disconnect the HDA power cable. 



2.12 /Take-Apart 



rev. Feb 90 



Macintosh Ilex 






Note: If the HDA is to be returned to Apple, retain 
the HDA power cable that is currently in the unit 
and exchange it with the cable in the replacement 
HDA. The replacement HDA cable should be 
returned to Apple along with the failed HDA. 



4. Remove the diode drive light on the front of the 
case (Figure 10) by lifting up on the plastic 
holder (Figure 10, #1) and pulling the diode 
(Figure 10, #2) out from the holder. 




FIGURE 10 

5. Grasp the two metals tabs (Figure 10, #3) located on 
the side of the hard disk drive bracket. Squeeze 
the tabs and gently pull up on the bracket. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Feb 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.13 



Note: On some hard disk drives, the power 
connector may not be on the top (as shown in the 
diagram). The connector may be on the back of the 
hard disk drive next to the 50-pin connector. 

The hard disk drive (with its metal bracket) will 
start to come out from the large plastic carrier unit 
(Figure 10, #4). However, the hard disk drive will 
not pull out all the way; you must first disconnect 
the power supply connector (Figure 10, #5). Then 
remove the hard disk drive. 

Note: If you are replacing the hard disk drive, you 
must remove the metal bracket. Replacement drives 
come in a metal bracket that fits in the Macintosh 
SE, SE/30, II, IIx, and life. 

6. Remove the customer's defective hard disk drive 
from its metal bracket by removing the four Phillips 
screws on the bottom of the bracket (Figure 11, #1). 

7. Remove the metal bracket from the replacement hard 
disk drive by removing the four Phillips screws on 
the bottom of the bracket. 

8. Position the customer's metal bracket on the 
replacement hard disk drive and secure the bracket 
with the four Phillips screws. 

9. Use the four Phillips screws to attach the metal 
bracket (supplied with the replacement HDA) to the 
customer's defective HDA. 

Note: The metal bracket supplied with the 
replacement HDA must be used to return the 
defective HDA. 



2.14 / Take-Apart rev. Apr 90 Macintosh Ilex 




FIGURE 11 



Replace 



1. Mount the hard disk drive onto the metal bracket 
and secure it with the four Phillips screws. 

2. Position the bracket and drive over the plastic disk 
drive carrier unit, and push in the power supply 
connector. Be careful not to push too hard or the 
printed circuit board may break. It is best to put 
your thumb on the back of the board to support it, 
and then squeeze the connector all the way on. 

3. Push the bracket and drive down into the carrier 
unit until the hard disk drive snaps into place. 

4. Connect the 50-pin connector on the back of the 
hard disk drive. 

5. Put the drive diode light back into the clear plastic 
lens. 

6. Reinsert the clear plastic lens into the front case 
housing. 

7. Replace the top lid . 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Feb 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.15 



□ DISK DRIVE CARRIER AND FLOPPY DISK DRIVE 



To remove the floppy disk drive, it is necessary to 
remove the whole plastic disk drive carrier unit 
(Figure 12, #1) that holds both the hard disk drive and 
the floppy disk drive. 




FIGURE 12 



Remove 



1. Remove the top lid . 

2. Remove the power supply . 

3. Remove the Phillips screw (Figure 12, #2) from the 
disk carrier. 

4. Remove the diode from the lens (Figure 13, #1). 

5. Pull up on the paper connector tab (Figure 13, #2) 
on the 50-pin connector (that secures the signal 
cable to the main logic board) and disconnect the 
cable connector. 






2.16 /Take-Apart 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 




FIGURE 13 

6. Disconnect the 20-pin connector (Figure 13, #3) 
from the logic board. 

7. Disconnect the power cable connector from the hard 
disk drive (Figure 13, #4). 

...Continued on next page 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.17 



8. Unlatch the bracket (Figure 14, #1) along the side 
of the carrier unit, and at the same time pull the 
whole carrier toward the rear of the case about a 
half-inch. When this distance is reached, lift up on 
the carrier to remove it from the case. 




FIGURE 14 

Note: If the hard disk drive is also to be removed, 
you can follow the removal steps in the "Hard Disk 
Drive" section above. It doesn't matter whether the 
disk drive carrier is in or out of the main case. 

9. Turn over the carrier unit and gently push down on 
the latch (Figure 15, #1) that holds the front of the 
floppy disk drive. 

10. Move the floppy disk drive toward, the front of the 
carrier about one inch, and pull the front of the 
floppy drive away from the carrier. The rest of the 
drive will follow. Remove the drive. 



2.18 /Take-Apart 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 




FIGURE 15 



Replace 



1. Turn the carrier unit upside down so that the bottom 
in facing up. 

2. Insert the floppy drive into the carrier, back end 
first, printed circuit side up, about an inch from the 
back of the carrier. 

3. Turn the carrier unit over, so that the floppy drive 
is now on the bottom. 



5. 



Swing the floppy drive into the carrier so that it is 
parallel to the carrier. Then push the drive down 
toward the back of the carrier until you hear and 
see the latch (Figure 15, #1) click over the front 
top of the floppy disk drive. 

Position the carrier unit over the logic board so 
that the front of the carrier is approximately one- 
half inch from the front of the case. 



Lower the carrier onto the logic board approximately 
1/2 to 3/4 inches from the front of the case, and then 
push the carrier forward until it snaps into position. 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.19 



The latch (Figure 16, #1) on the outside rear of the 
carrier goes over the indent on the case side. The 
hole on the right-rear side of the carrier, where the 
screw goes, will line up with the hole in the logic 
board. 



i 



^<D 




FIGURE 16 



7. Secure the carrier to the bottom case with the 
Phillips screw (Figure 16, #2). 

8. Connect the 20-pin floppy cable to the connector on 
the logic board. 

9. Connect the 50-pin cable connector to the connector 
on the logic board by aligning the connector over 
the pins and then pushing down on the connector. 

10. Connect the power connector to the hard disk 
printed circuit board. 

11. Replace the power supply . 

12. Replace the to p lid - 






2.20 /Take-Apart 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



□ RESET / INTERRUPT SWITCH 



If the reset/interrupt switch is installed, it must be 
removed before you can remove the main logic board. 



Remove 



1. Using one finger, lift up on the center tab 

(Figure 17, #1) of the switch. This action releases 
the switch from the logic board. 




FIGURE 17 



Lift the rear of the loosened switch up and away 
from the front of the case. You may have to wiggle 
the switch a little to get it to come away from the 
case. But do not force the switch; it can break easily. 



Replace 



Insert the front end of the switch (Figure 17, #2) down 
and into the two slots at the right-front bottom of the 
case. As the tabs on the front of the switch go into the 
slots, push the rest of the switch down until it snaps 
under the edge of the main logic board. 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Take-Apart / 2.21 



□ MAIN LOGIC BOARD 



Remove 



1. Remove the top lid . 

2. Remove interface cards . 

3. Remove the power supply . 

4. Remove the disk drive carrier . 

5. Remove the reset/interrupt switch Of installed) . 

6. Remove the speaker bracket . 

7. Slide the logic board toward the front of the case 
until it stops. 

8. Gently begin lifting the front end of the logic board 
up and out; the back end will follow. Lift the board 
completely out of the case. 



i 



Replace 



1. Insert the logic board into the case, back end first, 
so that its connectors gently align with the openings 
in the back of the bottom case. 

2. Lay the board flat on the bottom, making sure that 
the slots in the logic board fit over the tabs on the 
bottom of the case. 

Note: Before sliding the logic board toward the 
rear of the case, make sure that all the metal 
grounding tabs that surround the port holes on the 
rear of the case are not folded in front of the port 
holes. These metal tabs should press against the 
logic board connectors to form a common ground 
shield when the board is pushed in place. If a tab is 
accidentally folded over in front of the hole and the 
board is pushed against it, the tab could break off or 
the port hole could be blocked. 

3. Slide the logic board toward the rear of the case as 
far as it will go. You should feel and hear a slight 
thump. 

4. Replace the reset/interrupt switch (only if needed). 

5. Replace the speaker bracket . 

6. Replace the disk drive carrier . 



i 






2.22 /Take-Apart 



rev. Apr 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



7. Replace the power supply . 

8. Replace the interface cards (any that were removed). 

9. Replace the top lid . 



Macintosh Ilex rev. Apr 89 Take-Apart / 2.23 






# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Ilex 

Section 3 - Diagnostics 



□ CONTENTS 








3.2 


Introduction to MacTest Ilcx/IIci 




3.3 


Copying the Disk 




3.3 


Using Your Backup Disk 




3.4 


Running MacTest Ilcx/IIci 




3.4 


Starting MacTest Ilcx/IIci 




3.5 


Helpful Startup Information 




3.6 


Installing the Loopbacks 




3.7 


Using the MacTest Ilcx/IIci Menus 




3.12 


Running the Tests 




3.14 


Diagnostic Sound Sampler 




3.14 


Introduction 




3.14 


Procedure 




3.15 


Introduction to AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci 




3.16 


Running AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci 




3.16 


Setting Up the Test Station and UUT 




3.19 


Establishing Communication 




3.20 


Using the AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci Menus 




3.22 


Running the Tests 




3.24 


Helpful Suggestions 




3.25 


SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure 




3.25 


Determining If a Jumper Is Needed 




3.26 


External Jumpers on Old Cards 




3.26 


Summary 




3.26 


Installing the Jumper 



Note: MacTest Ilcx/IIci version 2.0 does not include 
test looping at this time. The looping feature will be 
added to a future version of the diagnostic. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Feb 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.1 



□ INTRODUCTION TO MacTest llcx/llci 



I 



The MacTest™ Hcx/IIci diagnostic disk (version 2.0 or 
higher) is part of the AppleCAT® Hcx/IIci diagnostic 
set but may also be used as a stand-alone confidence 
test of the Macintosh Ilex system. The MacTest 
Hcx/IIci disk includes the system folder, the MacTest 
Hcx/IIci program, and the Diagnostic Sound Sampler. 
The Diagnostic Sound Sampler lets you listen to the 
various musical chord sequences that are generated 
during a power-on failure. 

MacTest Hcx/IIci is a pass/fail confidence test. As the 
test progresses, messages on the screen indicate the 
test being performed and the test results. As soon as a 
failure is detected, the test stops and the screen 
indicates which module must be replaced before the 
test can be completed. MacTest Hcx/IIci then 
terminates and returns to the Finder (desktop). 

The MacTest Hcx/IIci program identifies the ROM 
version of the system and tests the following items: 

• Main logic board 

• Internal disk drive 

• External disk drive 

• NuBus video cards 

High-resolution color 

Color 

Monochrome 

Portrait 

Two-page 

• Apple PC 5.25 drive and Macintosh II PC card 

MacTest Hcx/IIci also provides test patterns for use in 
adjusting the high-resolution monitors. 

MacTest Hcx/IIci does not test the internal or external 
SCSI hard disk. To test the hard disk, use the Apple 
Hard Disk Test disk (see Section 3, Diagnostics, in SCSI 
Hard Disk Drives Technical Procedures). 

MacTest Hcx/IIci tests an internal NuBus expansion 
slot only when an Apple expansion card is installed. To 
test a NuBus expansion slot, install a NuBus video card, 
an EtherTalk card, or a Macintosh II PC card (with an 
Apple PC 5.25 drive) in the slot and select the 
appropriate test from the Test Selections window. 



3.2 / Diagnostics rev. Jan 90 Macintosh Ilex 



Copying the 
Disk 



Use the Finder to make a backup disk before you begin! 

When testing a defective Macintosh Ilex, it is possible 
to damage or erase a section of the MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
disk. 



Using Your 
Backup Disk 



Take the following precautions when using your backup 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk: 

• Do not write-protect your working copy of the 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk. The program will not run 
correctly if you do. 

• Do not change the name of the diagnostic program 
on the disk. During logic board testing, the machine 
reboots, looks for, and restarts the diagnostic named 
MacTest™ cx/ci (notice that "II" is omitted from the 
CPU designations, due to character string 
constraints). If the name has been changed, the 
startup routine will not be able to locate the 
program and the system will stay at the desktop. 

If the MacTest™ Ilcx/IIci window does not reappear 
after a logic board test, check the name of the 
diagnostic icon on the desktop. Correct it to 
MacTest™ cx/ci; then select Set Startup from the 
desktop Special menu. When you are asked Upon 
Startup automatically open: MacTest™ cx/ci, click OK. 
Then double-click the corrected MacTest™ cx/ci icon 
when you return to the test program. 

It is important that you do not change the program name. 
If the program name is changed, the diagnostic may not 
work. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Jan 90 



Diagnostics / 3.3 



□ RUNNING MacTest ilcx/llci 



Materials Required 



MacTest Ilcx/IIci diagnostic disk (backup) 

Mini-DIN-8-to-mini-DIN-8 serial port cable 

SCSI loopback test card (modified with jumper — see 

"SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure") 
Known-good blank 800K disk for drive test 
Known-good blank 1.4 MB disk for FDHD drive test 
Macintosh Ilex 
Macintosh II video card 



Starting 
MacTest Ilcx/llci 



You can use MacTest Ilcx/IIci to perform a confidence 
test of the entire Macintosh Ilex system or to test a 
single component in a known-good system. Follow the 
start-up steps below for the testing you wish to perform. 



Testing the 
Complete System 
or Logic Board 



If you are testing a complete Macintosh Ilex system, 
or if you intend to run the logic board tests, turn 
the power off. 



3. 



Note: The application is shipped with the default 
setting to run all tests. 

Install the loopback connectors as described under 
"Installing the Loopbacks," later in this section. 

Insert the MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk into the internal 
drive, and switch on the system. MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
will display the Status window (Figure 1). From the 
Status window you can click Start to run the tests. 



MacTest™ Ilex I lei 



CjEZ) 

Pause 




Status: 

Click Start to begin selected tests. 



FIGURE 1 






3.4 / Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 






Testing a 

Single 

Component 



1. If you are testing a single component in a known- 
good system, insert the MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk into 
the internal drive, and switch on the system. 

2. If you selected the SCSI loopback test, MacTest 
Ilcx/IIci will display a window that tells you to 
turn off the power and connect the SCSI loopback 
board. Click OK to get to the MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
Status window. 

3. From the Status window you can use the MacTest 
Ilcx/IIci menus. Go to the Options menu and use 
the Test Selections submenu to select the tests you 
want to run. Click OK to exit the Test Selections 
window. 

4. From the Status window, click Start. For more 
specific information on the tests, see "Using the 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci Menus" and "Running the Tests," 
later in this section. 



Helpful Startup 
Information 



If any of the following problems are encountered, 
refer to Section 4, Troubleshooting, for additional 
information: 



• The known-good MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk will not 
boot. 

• The Configuration window does not show the 
installed card(s). 

• The Configuration window indicates there are no 
disk drives installed, or that fewer drives are 
installed than is the case. 

• The Macintosh Ilex system intermittently locks up 
during the tests. 

• The Configuration window indicates the wrong 
amount of RAM installed. 

If you do not know whether the system you are testing 
is good, 

• Run the MacTest Ilcx/IIci logic, drive, and video 
card tests. (See "Using the MacTest Ilcx/IIci Menus" 
and "Running the Tests," later in this section.) 
Complete any needed repairs before you continue. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Jan 90 



Diagnostics / 3.5 



If you removed a Macintosh II PC card, run the 
Apple PC 5.25 drive test as described in Section 3 
of the Apple PC 5.25 Drive Technical Procedures. 

If you removed any expansion cards, install them 
one at a time, and run the MacTest Ilcx/IIci logic, 
drive, and monitor tests after each card is installed. 
Repeat the install-and-test process until all 
expansion cards are installed and the Macintosh Ilex 
passes all tests. 






Installing the 
Loopbacks 



If you are running the serial loopback test or the SCSI 
test, you must connect either the serial loopback cable 
or the SCSI loopback card — along with the keyboard, 
the mouse, and the monitor. 

CAUTION: Always switch off the system when you 
connect or disconnect the SCSI loopback card. 

The SCSI loopback card cable (Figure 2, #1) must be 
connected to the SCSI port (Figure 2, #2) on the back 
of the Macintosh Ilex. (No other connections between 
the card and the Macintosh Ilex are necessary.) To 
protect the SCSI circuitry, you must have the power off 
when you connect the SCSI card. The loopback cable 
(Figure 2, #3) with the mini DIN-8 connectors must be 
installed between the modem and printer ports 
(Figure 2, #4) on the rear of the machine. 




FIGURE 2 






3.6 / Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 



Using the 
MacTest llcx/IIci 
Menus 



Before you start MacTest llcx/IIci, you can use the 
MacTest llcx/IIci menus to select the tests you want to 
run or to select other features of the diagnostic. You 
cannot use the menus when the tests are running. 



Options Menu 



The Options menu contains the Test Selections and 
Configuration submenus. 

1. Test Selections The following window (Figure 3) 
appears when you chose Test Selections: 



Macintosh I Ick/I lei Test Selections 



E<] Logic test 
® Short O Long RAM 



Loopback Tests: 
[3 SCSI Loopback 
13 Serial Loopback 

HDB Communication: 
13 Keyboard 
3 Mouse 



Uideo Tests: 
ElUideo Card in Slot 
E3 Uideo Monitor Connected to Selected Card 
□ UMeo Monitor Conne< ted to Built-in Uideo 



Floppy Disk Driues: 
□ £*<tornBi Hopp.M 



3 Internal Floppy 



□ Loop on 7*\sH Selec ted 



Cancel 



OK 



FIGURE 3 

Test Selections allows you to select the tests you 
wish to run and identifies the slot number in which 
the card to be tested is installed. If an EtherTalk 
card, Macintosh II PC card, or a NuBus video card is 
not installed in an expansion slot, the selection for 
that test will be dimmed. 

To select a test, click the box next to the name of 
the item to be tested. The box will display an X. 
To deselect the test, click the box again to remove 
the X. When you have selected all the tests you 
wish, click OK. The Status window will appear. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Jan 90 



Diagnostics / 3.7 



The tests selectable from the Test Selections 
window are listed below: 

a) Logic verifies the correct functioning of the 
following circuitry on the logic board: 



VIA (Versatile Interface Adapter) 

Apple Stereo Sound Chip 

Clock/PRAM 

FPU (Floating-Point Unit) 

RAM 



i 



You can select a short or a long RAM test when 
you select the logic test. The running time of the 
test depends on how much memory is installed. At 
the beginning of the RAM test, MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
indicates the maximum running time of the test. 

The logic board test generates a standard A- 
major chord out of sound channel A. This chord 
will be heard on the internal speaker. The 
volume can be modified with the control panel. 

Note: Once the RAM test begins, you cannot 
interrupt it. 

b) SCSI Loopback tests the SCSI chip, the SCSI bus 
signals, and the external SCSI connector. You 
must have the SCSI loopback card connected to 
the external SCSI port when you run this test. 

c) Serial Loopback tests the SCC chip (serial 
communication chip), serial communication 
signals, and the serial connectors. You must 
have the serial loopback cable connected when 
you run this test. 

d) Keyboard Communications confirms that the logic 
board can correctly communicate with the ADB 
keyboard. 

e) Mouse Communications confirms that the logic 
board can correctly communicate with the ADB 
mouse. 

Floppy Disk Drives verifies the functioning of 
the 1.4 MB internal, 800K external, or 1.4 MB 
external disk drives, and related circuitry on 
the logic board. 



> 



3.8 / Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 









g) Video card in slot tests a Macintosh II video card 
installed in one of the expansion slots on the 
Macintosh Ilex. If more than one video card is 
installed, you must tell MacTest Ilcx/IIci which 
video card to test, or else the test will default 
to the lowest slot number with a video card in 
it. Enter the slot number of the video card you 
want to test in the box after Video card in slot. 
Use the keyboard to type in the correct slot 
number. 

h) Video monitor connected to a selected card 

displays test patterns that are used to adjust the 
video picture on the high-resolution monitors. 
This test displays test patterns on the monitor 
connected to the selected video card. If you are 
adjusting a second monitor, select the other card 
slot on the video test control. 

Note: The tests for the Apple Macintosh Portrait 
Display and the Two-Page Monochrome Monitor 
require extended memory to display the test 
patterns. Also, these monitors must be connected 
when you boot the system. 

Note: Refer to the appropriate monitor Technical 
Procedures for information about any necessary 
monitor adjustments. 

i) Apple PC 5.25 Drive and Card verifies the 

correct functioning of the drive, the Macintosh II 
PC card, and the expansion slot. To set up for 
this test, follow the instructions in Section 3, 
Diagnostics, in the Apple PC 5.25 Drive 
Technical Procedures. 

Note: The Apple PC 5.25 drive test cannot 
always determine which module caused a test to 
fail. If the test reports that the drive and/or 
card is bad, replace one module at a time as 
described in Section 4, Troubleshooting, in the 
Apple PC 5.25 Drive Technical Procedures. It 
should also be noted that if you have two Apple 
PC 5.25 cards installed, you must select the slot 
holding the card to be tested. 



Macintosh Hex rev. Jan 90 Diagnostics / 3.9 



j) Loop on all selected tests provides continuous 
running (in sequence) of all selected tests. To 
stop the looping, click the Stop box between 
tests (when the screen displays an arrow and not 
a wristwatch). 



i 



Note: You cannot loop tests 

On both the logic board and drive tests at 

the same time. 

When the monitor test is selected. 

On the drive tests if any other test is 

selected. 

Configuration The following window (Figure 4) 
appears when you select Configuration: 



--> Macintosh IIck Configuration <— 








Memory Size: 5 MB 








ROM Uersion: 1.0 








Slot 1: Macintosh II Portrait Uideo Card 








Slot 2: No Card Detected 








Slot 3: No Card Detected 








Enternal Driue: 800K 
Internal Driue: 800K 








i; 


OK 


J 









FIGURE 4 

This window displays the amount of memory, the 
version number of the ROMs, the cards installed in 
expansion slots 1 through 3 of the Macintosh Ilex, 
and the current disk drive configuration. 



3.10 /Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 






File Menu 



The File menu displays the following items. (Open and 
Close are always dimmed; Save and Stop are sometimes 
dimmed.) 



• Open 


[Always dimmed] 


• Close 


[Always dimmed] 


• Save Test Selections 


[Command-S] 


• Stop 


[Command-.] 


• Quit 


[Command-Q] 



Save Test Selections allows you to customize your 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk by saving your selection of tests 
for the next time you use MacTest Ilcx/IIci. Save Test 
Selections is dimmed if no changes have been made. 

Stop ends the diagnostic and returns you to the MacTest 
Ilcx/IIci Status window. 

Quit returns you to the desktop. 



Apple Menu 



The Apple (#) menu contains the following three 
selections: 



About MacTest Hcx/IIci displays a dialog box with 
the diagnostic name, the version number, the date of 
release, and a copy-protect statement. 

Control Panel allows you to set preferences for 
speaker volume, monitor status, desktop pattern, and 
mouse tracking. 

Key Caps displays a window with a keyboard. Press 
each key on the keyboard and verify that the 
display block for the key is highlighted. If the key 
is not highlighted, the keyswitch is bad and should 
be replaced. If numerous keys are not highlighted, 
exchange the keyboard. 






Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Jan 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.11 



Running 
the Tests 



After selecting the tests you wish to run using 
Test Selections, you are ready to start MacTest Ilcx/IIci. 
Click the Start box in the MacTest Ilcx/IIci Status 
window. Please note the following: 

• The Status line at the bottom of the MacTest 
Ilcx/IIci window keeps you informed of the tests 
being performed and the test results. 

• While running, all tests display a wristwatch. There 
is no other moving or flashing indicator that tells 
you the test is in progress. 

• You cannot stop the diagnostic while the cursor is a 
wristwatch; you can stop the diagnostic only while 
the cursor is a pointer. 

• If the SCSI test is selected and the loopback card is 
missing or improperly installed, you are instructed 
to turn off the power, disconnect all external SCSI 
drives, and connect the SCSI loopback card. 

• If the serial test is selected and the loopback cable 
is missing or improperly installed, the testing will 
begin, but the serial ports test will fail. You will 
be instructed to make sure the serial loopback cable 
is connected and then to click Continue to retry the 
failed test. (You can connect the serial loopback 
cable without switching off the system.) 

• When testing the disk drives, you are prompted to 
insert and remove blank 800K and FDHD disks. 
Perform the disk swaps as directed on the screen, 
and then click OK. 



Note: It is important to insert the requested low- or 
high-density disk. If the wrong disk is inserted, 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci will indicate that the disk drive is 
malfunctioning when it may not be. 

CAUTION: Do not press the reset or interrupt switch 
while the RAM test is running. Pushing reset causes the 
RAM test to fail, and pressing interrupt may damage the 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk. 



3.12 /Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 



• You can halt the testing by clicking Stop or Pause 
anytime between tests while the cursor is a pointer. 

- Choose Stop to halt the testing and to return to 
the MacTest Ilcx/IIci Status window. Choose 
Start to begin the testing sequence again. 

- Choose Pause to discontinue testing temporarily. 
Choose Continue to resume the tests from the 
point of interruption. 

Replace any module that the test indicates is faulty (see 
Section 2, Take-Apart). Before replacing the module, 
use AppleCAT IIcx/Hci or refer to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, to verify the diagnosis. If the system 
is still not operating properly, turn to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, for more information. 

If all tests pass, the Macintosh Ilex returns to the 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci Status window. The message All 
selected tests have passed displays on the Status line. 

When you choose Loop on all selected tests, a looping 
counter shows the number of completed loops. 



Macintosh Ilex rev. Jan 90 Diagnostics / 3.13 



□ DIAGNOSTIC SOUND SAMPLER 



Introduction 



The Diagnostic Sound Sampler enables you to listen to 
and become familiar with the Macintosh Hex error 
chords. Error chords are brief, musical tones that 
indicate whether the system is functioning correctly or 
if there is a hardware problem. 

Refer to Section 4, Troubleshooting, for complete 
information on startup and error chords. 



Materials Required 



Known-good Macintosh Ilex system 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci (backup) 



Procedure 



To listen to the various Macintosh Ilex error chords, 
follow these steps: 

1. Set up the Macintosh Ilex system. 

2. Insert the MacTest Ilcx/IIci backup disk. A window 
appears. 

3. Click Quit from the File menu. The desktop 
appears. 

4. Open the disk or folder and then open the 
Diagnostic Sound Sampler. A window listing the 
various chords and chord sequences displays. Select 
the ones you wish to hear. 

5. On completion, click Quit. 



3.14 /Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 



□ INTRODUCTION TO AppleCAT llcx/llci 



) 



AppleCAT® Ilcx/IIci is a diagnostic tool that uses a 
known-good Macintosh to diagnose module failures in a 
defective Macintosh Ilex. The known-good Macintosh 
(test station) and defective Macintosh Ilex (unit under 
test, or UUT) are connected through their 
communication ports. The test station performs the 
following functions: 

• Establishes communications with the UUT 

• Calls tests in the UUT ROM 

• Downloads tests to the faulty machine 

• Calls tests for MacTest in the UUT disk drive 

• Displays test results on the test station screen 

• Identifies the failing module 

• Prompts the technician for information 

• Recommends a repair procedure 

With AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci, the unit under test does not 
have to be fully operational. By using an independent, 
working computer to do the diagnosis, AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci depends very little on the unit under test 
(UUT), making the test results more reliable and 
thorough than traditional diagnostic methods. 

Standard windows guide the technician through each 
stage of the diagnostic. When the UUT fails a test or 
indicates a problem, an AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci screen asks 
for more information or recommends a repair. 

After each module replacement or adjustment, AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci reruns all the prior tests to verify that the 
problem has been fixed. If the UUT successfully 
completes a final system verification, an alert window 
reports All selected tests passed, click start to begin. 

There is also a looping mode that allows users to check 
for intermittent RAM failures. This mode is available 
only for testing RAM. 



Macintosh Ilex rev. Jan 90 Diagnostics / 3.15 



□ RUNNING AppleCAT llcx/llci 



Materials Required 



Macintosh Ilex (unit under test, or UUT) 
Known-good Macintosh Plus, SE, SE/30, II, IIx Ilex, or 

Ilci (test station) 
AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci diagnostic disk 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk 
Blank 800K disk 
Blank 1.4 MB disk 
Programmer's switch for the UUT 
Mini-DIN-8-to-mini-DIN-8 serial port cable 
SCSI loopback card 
Mini DIN-8 serial loopback plug 
Video card in slot 1 
Digital multimeter or volt/ohmmeter 
#2 Phillips screwdriver 
Monitor 

Known-good ADB keyboard for the UUT 
Known-good ADB mouse for the keyboard 



i 



Setting Up the 
Test Station 
and UUT 



1. Connect the test station to a wall socket with an 
AC power cord. 

2. Place the UUT next to the test station and connect 
the UUT to a wall socket with an AC power cord. 

3. Connect the SCSI loopback card (Figure 5, #1) to 
the SCSI port (Figure 5, #2) on the UUT. 

4. Connect the serial loopback plug to the printer port 
(Figure 5, #3) on the UUT. 




FIGURE 5 



3.16 /Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 






5. Connect one end of the serial port cable to the 
modem port (Figure 6, #1) on the UUT and connect 
the other end to the modem port (Figure 6, #2) on 
the test station. 



6. Connect a known-good keyboard to the ADB port on 
the UUT and connect a known-good mouse to the 
other ADB port (Figure 6, #3) on the UUT. 

Note: Both a keyboard and a mouse must be 
connected if you want to test either device. 



/i 






/mmm////i\\\mmms&K 












FIGURE 6 

7. Verify that the programmer's switch (Figure 7) is 
installed. With the front of the Macintosh Ilex 
(UUT) facing you, look at the lower-left corner 
where the two slots are, and see if the switch is 
installed (Figure 7, #1). If it is not installed, then 
you must install one. Refer to Section 2, Take- 
Apart, for installation instructions. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Jan 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.17 



Verify that the programmer's switch (Figure 7) is 
installed. With the front of the Macintosh Ilex 
(UUT) facing you, look at the lower-left corner 
where the two slots are, and see if the switch is 
installed (Figure 7, #1). If it is not installed, then 
you must install one. Refer to Section 2, Take- 
Apart, for installation instructions. 




FIGURE 7 

The programmer's switch has two buttons (Figure 8). 
The left button is the reset switch. Pressing it is 
just like turning the power switch off and back on. 
The right button is an interrupt switch. Pressing 
the interrupt switch places the UUT in interrupt 
mode. 




Reset Interrupt 

FIGURE 8 



3.18/ Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 






Establishing 
Communication 



1. Insert the AppleCAT Hcx/IIci disk into the test 
station, and switch on the test station. 

2. Open the disk icon and then the AppleCAT Hcx/IIci 
icon. The AppleCAT Hcx/IIci Start window 
(Figure 9) appears on the test station screen. 



i 



Start 



Pause 



flppleCfiK' IIck, 



f > 

I* 








/»Wl^BBBmSSSSSCS m J 







Status: 

Click Start ta bsqin selected teste. 






FIGURE 9 



3. Make sure that all disks are ejected from the UUT. 

4. Switch on the UUT. If you hear only the boot tone 
(a single chord), you are not in interrupt mode. To 
get into interrupt mode, wait about four seconds per 
megabyte of installed memory, and then press the 
interrupt switch (see Figure 8). When in interrupt 
mode, or test mode, the UUT can respond to 
information received over the communication port. 

IMPORTANT: If you hear any additional chords after the 
single boot tone, you are already in interrupt/test mode. 
Do not hit the interrupt switch. The Macintosh Ilex will 
automatically go into interrupt mode if an error is detected 
at power on. 

Note: If the unit boots with the hard disk or with any 
bootable disk that was left in the UUT disk drive 
during power on, the window for pressing the interrupt 
switch on the UUT was missed. If the window was 
missed, press the reset on the UUT, and start over at 
step 3. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Jan 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.19 



Using the 
AppleCAT Ilcx/llci 
Menus 



Before you start AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci, use the AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci menus to select the tests you want to run or 
to select other features of the diagnostic. 

Note: You must make your test selections before you 
start AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci. Changes to the test selections 
cannot be made while AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci is running. If 
you do not use the Test Selections submenu, the default 
test selection will include the following tests: 

• Logic Board (which includes RAM testing) 

• Internal Drive 

IMPORTANT: Selecting specific tests shortens the 
AppleCAT Ilcx/llci test, but you may not find all faulty 
modules. Except for not testing the video card, the default 
test selections will ensure a complete system check. 



Options Menu 



The Options menu contains the Test Selections submenu 
(Figure 10). When you choose Test Selections, the 
following window appears: 



RppleCRT Mch Test Selections 

O Macintosh I lei (non parity) 
O Macintosh Mci (parity) 
<§) Macintosh Mch 



£3 Logic Board 

[3 Internal Disk Driue 

□ NuBus Uideo Card 



□ loop on BflM ie*X 

OSiop H *<* SIMM f&tls 

O Continue if <* SIMM fails 



Cancel 



^D 



FIGURE 10 



3.20 / Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 









Test Selections allows you to select certain tests 
individually. To select a test, click the box next to the 
name of the item to be tested. The box will display an 
X. To deselect the test, click the box again to remove 
the X. When you have selected all the tests you wish, 
click OK. You will be returned to the AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci Start window. 

Note: Test Selections will remain in effect until you 
change them or you reboot AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci. 

• UUT Selection allows you to select one of the 
following: 

Ilci (non-parity) 
Ilci (parity) 

- Ilex 

• Logic Board verifies the correct functioning of the 
following circuitry on the Macintosh Ilex logic 
boards: 

- ROM 

Memory size plus RAM testing 
CPU data bus and address bus 
VIA (Versatile Interface Adapter) 
Internal clock 
Parameter RAM 

- Serial ports (SCC) 

- External SCSI bus 
NuBus control circuitry 

- SWIM (Disk Controller IC) 

- FPU (Floating-Point Unit) 
Apple Stereo Sound Chip 

Note: Although AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci tests the SCSI 
circuitry on the logic board, it does not test the 
internal SCSI hard disk. To test the hard disk, use 
the Apple Hard Disk Test disk (see Section 3, 
Diagnostics, in the SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures). 

• Macintosh n Video Card runs only if you have a 
video card installed. The test checks the video RAM 
on the video card and the video DAC (digital-to- 
analog converter). The video card must be installed 
in slot 1 before running this test. 



Macintosh Ilex rev. Jan 90 Diagnostics / 3.21 



Internal Drive verifies the proper functioning of the 
drive, cable, and SWIM circuitry. 



i 



File Menu 



The File menu displays the following items. All are 
dimmed except Stop and Quit. 



Open 


[Dimmed] 


Close 


[Dimmed unless a desk 




accessory is open] 


Save Test Selections 




Stop 


[Command-.] 


Quit 


[Command-Q] 



Stop ends the diagnostic and returns you to the 
AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci Start window. 

Quit exits the program and returns you to the desktop. 



Apple Menu 



The Apple (#) menu contains the following three 
choices: 



• About Diagnostic displays the diagnostic name, 
version number, date of release, serial number, and 
a copy-protect statement. 

• Control Panel sets preferences for things such as 
speaker volume, mouse tracking, whether or not 
AppleTalk is connected, and the desktop pattern. 

• Key Caps displays a window with a keyboard. 



> 



Running 
the Tests 



After using Test Selections to select the tests you wish 
to run, you are ready to start AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci. Click 
Start in the AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci window. Please note 
the following: 

• The Status line at the bottom of the AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci window keeps you informed of the tests 
being performed and their results. 

Note: If the message Could not establish 

communication appears on the Status line, you may 
have inserted a bootable disk in the UUT disk drive 
before switching the unit on. If this message 
appears, follow the instructions given in the 
AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci window. 



3.22 / Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 



• AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci interacts with you throughout 
each stage of the testing. When the UUT fails a test 
or indicates a problem, AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci prompts 
you for more information or recommends a repair. 

• By displaying a choice of answers, AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci asks you for information that it cannot 
obtain electronically. Select the most appropriate 
answer for each situation. After selecting a 
response, click OK to continue. 

CA UTION: Do not click the OK button until you've 
completed every instruction given on the screen. Failure 
to complete the instructions may misdirect the diagnostic. 

• If the UUT is turned off to replace or reinstall a 
module, 

a) Verify that all cables and test fixtures are 
reattached before switching on the UUT. Do not 
click the OK button until you've completed 
every instruction given on the screen. 

b) Eject any disk from the UUT before switching on 
the UUT. 

c) If you do not hear the test mode chimes, press 
reset and wait about four seconds per megabyte 
of RAM, and then press the interrupt switch to 
get into the test mode. 

d) Click Start at the test station to restart the test. 

• AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci will also ask you to perform 
setup steps when checking drives, video cards, and 
the ADB. When the Setup Required window 
appears, insert the requested disk. AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci will specify which drive to use. After 
inserting the disk, click Done to continue the test. 
AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci will request the following disks: 

- 800K disk (blank and write-enabled) 

High-density disk (blank and write-enabled) 
Write-protected MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk 



Macintosh Ilex rev. Jan 90 Diagnostics / 3.23 



• You may halt the testing by clicking Stop or 
Pause anytime during the tests: 

a) Choose Stop to halt the testing and to return to 
the Status window. Choose Start to begin the 
testing sequence again from the beginning. 

b) Choose Pause to discontinue testing temporarily. 
Choose Continue to resume testing from the 
point of interruption. 

IMPORTANT: Please read all messages and instructions 
carefully. Do only what AppleCA T llcx/llci specifically 
instructs you to do. 

When the UUT passes its final test, an alert window 
will show All selected tests passed, click start to begin. 



Helpful 
Suggestions 



If the unit passes AppleCAT Hcx/IIci but is still not 
running correctly, refer to Section 4, Troubleshooting, 
for information that can help you isolate the problem. 
Also keep in mind that AppleCAT Hcx/IIci is unable to 
identify a system failure if any of the following is true: 

• The bad module fails intermittently. 

• The system configuration changes during the test 
(memory is removed or added, or system power is 
removed). 

• Selected modules are tested; except for the video 
card, only the default tests perform a complete 
system check. 

• The replacement module itself is bad. 

• You provided inaccurate input to AppleCAT Hcx/IIci, 
or set up the test station incorrectly. 



i 






3.24 / Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 






□ SCSI LOOPBACK JUMPER PROCEDURE 



Determining 
If a Jumper 
Is Needed 



In order to use the SCSI loopback card with MacTest 
Ilcx/IIci and AppleCAT Ilci, the card must be jumpered 
between pin 25 of Jl and pin 14 of RP1. On new SCSI 
loopback cards, the jumper has been etched into the 
printed circuit. Only cards with the old PCB circuitry 
need the jumper procedure. 

Note: This modification does not interfere with the 
card's use on other Macintosh or Apple II family 
systems, except that to work on Apple II systems the 
card must be connected to a notched mouse cable. (For 
further information on the notched cable, refer to 
Section 5, "SCSI Interface Card" in the SCSI Hard Disk 
Drives Technical Procedures. 



To determine if you have a new card, which will not 
need to be jumpered, look at the back of the card. If 
the jumper is included in the circuitry, there is an A 
instead of double zeros (00) at the end of the part 
number, which is located under the words APPLE 
COMPUTER (Figure 11, #1). These new cards do not 
have to be jumpered. 




FIGURE 11 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Jan 90 



Diagnostics / 3.25 



External 
Jumpers on 
Old Cards 



Some cards with the 00 part number and the old 
artwork were modified with an external jumper during 
the manufacturing process. Therefore, if your card has a 
00 part number, check to see if it has an external 
jumper from pin 25 of Jl to pin 14 of RP1 (Figure 12, 
#1). If the card does not have an external jumper, you 
must install one yourself. 



i 




FIGURE 12 



Summary 



To summarize: 

If # on back 
ends with: 
A 



00 



Do this: 

Nothing 

(Jumper is present in artwork.) 

Check to see if external jumper 
is present. If not, install jumper. 



Installing 
the Jumper 



If you find that the card must be jumpered, solder a 
wire connection between pin 25 of Jl and pin 14 of 
RP1, as shown in Figure 12. (The pins are not 
numbered on the board. In the orientation shown in 
Figure 12, pin 25 is the pin closest to the upper-left 
corner of the card; pin 14 is in the middle line of pins 
and closest to the left edge of the card.) 



3.26 / Diagnostics 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 



6 Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Ilex 

Section 4 - Troubleshooting 



□ CONTENTS 



4.3 


Introduction 


4.3 


General Information 


4.3 


Before You Start 


4.3 


Error Chords 


4.3 


How to Use the Symptom Charts 


4.4 


How to Use the Troubleshooting Flowcharts 


4.5 


Things to Remember 


4.7 


Module Exchange Information 


4.7 


Logic Board Configuration 


4.7 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 


4.8 


Startup and Error Chords 


4.8 


Introduction 


4.8 


Startup Chord 


4.8 


Error Chords 


4.9 


Summary 


4.11 


Symptom Chart 


4.11 


Video Problems 


4.12 


Drive Problems 


4.12 


SCSI Problems 


4.13 


Peripheral Problems 


4.14 


Miscellaneous Problems 


4.16 


Macintosh Ilex Flowcharts 


4.16 


Flowchart 1 Notes 


4.18 


Flowchart 2 Notes 


4.20 


Flowchart 3 Notes 


4.22 


Flowchart 4 Notes 


4.24 


Flowchart 5 Notes 


4.26 


SIMM Verification 


4.26 


Introduction 


4.26 


Isolating to the Customer's SIMMs 


4.27 


Verification 


4.28 


Verification Flowchart Notes 



.Continued on next page 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.1 



4.30 Battery Verification 

4.30 Introduction 

4.30 Verification Procedure 



i 



Note: If a step is underlined, instructions for that step 
can be found in Section 2, Take-Apart. 



4.2 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



□ INTRODUCTION 

General 
Information 



There are three test disks that may be used to test 
portions of the Macintosh Ilex system: 

• AppleCAT™ Ilex 

• MacTest™ Ilex 

• Apple Hard Disk Test 
(version 1.0 or higher) 

Use this troubleshooting section if you are unable to 
boot the MacTest Ilex disk, or if the disk is unable to 
detect a module failure. After you repair the system, 
run the test disk again to verify system operation. 



Before 
You Start 



Read the sections titled "Things to Remember," 
"Module Exchange Information," "Startup and Error 
Chords," "SIMM Verification," and "Battery Verification" 
before you begin troubleshooting. You need the 
information provided in these sections to troubleshoot 
the Macintosh Ilex effectively. 






Error Chords 



The Macintosh Ilex executes a ROM-based self-test 
when switched on. If any part of the self-test fails, a 
sequence of chords will sound. To hear a sample of 
each sequence of chords, listen to the Diagnostic Sound 
Sampler on the MacTest Ilex disk. (Refer to Section 3, 
Diagnostics, for more information.) 



How to Use 

the Symptom 
Charts 



First find the symptom that most nearly describes 
the problem; then perform the first corrective action 
on the solution list. If that corrective action does 
not fix the problem, go to the next one. If you replace 
a module and find that the problem remains, reinstall 
the original module before you go on to the next action. 

If the symptoms displayed by the Macintosh Ilex are not 
listed in the symptom charts, or if the system is not 
displaying a clearly defined problem, use the flowchart 
sections. 






Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.3 



How to Use the 

Troubleshooting 

Flowcharts 



There are five numbered flowcharts for the 
Macintosh Ilex. On completion of Flowchart 1, you 
will be instructed to continue to the next flowchart. 
Continue until you complete Flowchart 5. 



Each of the flowcharts includes references to notes on 
the opposite page. These notes provide additional 
instructions or referrals to other procedures. 

Starting at the top of Flowchart 1, answer the questions 
and proceed down the chart. When you arrive at a 
rectangular box containing a list of actions, perform the 
actions in the sequence listed. On completion, return 
to the preceding diamond box. If the problem remains, 
reinstall the original module before you go on to the 
next action. 



4.4 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






□ THINGS TO REMEMBER 



ESD 



1. Follow all electrostatic discharge (ESD) 

precautions when working on the Macintosh Ilex. 
Refer to the You Oughta Know tab in the Apple 
Service Technical Procedures for additional 
information. 



Troubleshooting 
Hints 



2. If available, use a known-good monitor and video 
interface card. This will isolate the problem to the 
CPU, internal drive, keyboard, and mouse. 

3. Before you begin troubleshooting, remove all 
interface cards (except the video interface card) and 
disconnect any external devices (printers, SCSI 
devices, and/or ADB devices other than the 
keyboard and mouse). 

After the Macintosh Ilex has passed the diagnostic 
tests, each expansion card or peripheral must be 
installed and tested. Install one device and test the 
system before adding any others. Repeat the install- 
and-test process until all devices have been 
installed and tested. 

4. Mark each known-good SIMM module on the logic 
board with white correction fluid or a small sticker 
to prevent confusion during the troubleshooting 
procedure. 

5. Use a known-good copy of the MacTest Ilex disk. 



Normal 
Startup Tone 



During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
soft chord is emitted. If this does not happen, refer 
to "Startup and Error Chords" for additional 
information. 



System 
Configuration 



7. To ensure that customers get back the same system 
configurations that they bring in, record the 
following information: 



• The size of the SCSI hard disk (20 MB, 40 MB, 
80 MB), if one is installed 

• SIMM sizes for both banks 

• Type and serial number of expansion cards 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Aug 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.5 



System Software 



Verify that the customer is using System 6.0.3 and 
Finder 6.1 (or higher). Using the wrong versions 
may destroy data. 



> 



4.6 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






□ MODULE EXCHANGE INFORMATION 



Logic Board 
Configuration 



The Macintosh Ilex logic board service exchange 
module is shipped without RAM SIMMs. 

To make sure that customers always get back the same 
logic board configurations that they brought in, be sure 
to record the following information before you 
exchange any modules: 

• The amount of memory installed and the size of the 
SIMMs in each bank 

• If a ROM SIMM is installed 



Internal 
Hard Disk 
SCSI 



The internal 20 MB, 40 MB, and 80 MB SCSI hard disk 
service modules are shipped without the SCSI cable 
connected. Be sure to keep the SCSI cable with the 
customer's Macintosh Ilex system. The SCSI cable is 
sold as a separate replacement part and is not part of 
any module. 



The SCSI power cable is included with all the internal 
SCSI drive modules. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Aug 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.7 



□ STARTUP AND ERROR CHORDS 



Introduction 



When the Macintosh Ilex is switched on, the ROM 
executes a self-test. If any part of the self-test fails, a 
sequence of chords will sound. To hear a sample of 
each sequence of chords, listen to the "Diagnostic Sound 
Sampler," which is included on the MacTest Ilex disk. 
(Refer to Section 3, Diagnostics, for more information.) 

If you are unable to interpret the chords, use the 
flowcharts and ignore the question about the startup 
chord on Flowchart 1. 



i 



Startup Chords 



During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
chord is emitted; then a disk icon with a flashing 
question mark is displayed on the screen. If a hard 
disk is installed, there will not be any flashing 
question mark. 



Error Chords 



If a startup chord and additional chords -sound, a blank 
gray screen will usually be displayed. Three cords will 
always sound when an error is encountered during 
startup: startup chord, error chord, and test monitor 
chord. 



) 



Initial Failure 



Refer to the list of failure areas below, which includes 
a description of each error chord, the problem it 
indicates, and what to do to correct the problem. 



A short, harsh chord indicates a failure during the 
initial hardware self-tests. To correct the problem: 

1. Exchange the logic board. (Install the customer's 
SIMM modules on the exchange board.) 

2. If exchanging the logic board doesn't work, use the 
customer's logic board and exchange the SIMMs 
only. (Refer to "SIMM Verification" in this section 
for complete instructions.) 

If the system still does not work, you will need to 
verify the customer's SIMMs on the exchange logic 
board. (Refer to "SIMM Verification" in this section for 
complete instructions.) 



4.8 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






RAM 1 and 2 Failure 



A long, medium-pitched chord (RAM 1, in Bank A) or a 
medium-pitched, then high-pitched chord (RAM 2, in 
Bank B) indicates a RAM self-test failure. To correct 
the problem: 



1. Exchange only the SIMMs in Bank A. (Refer to 
"SIMM Verification" in this section for complete 
instructions.) 

2. Exchange only the SIMMs in Bank B. (Refer to 
"SIMM Verification" in this section for complete 
instructions.) 

3. If these exchanges do not work, exchange the logic 
board. (Install the customer's SIMM modules on the 
exchange board.) 

4. If the system still does not work, you will need to 
do the SIMM verification with the exchange logic 
board. 



Test Monitor 



Four chords (from low to high) indicate that the system 
has entered the test monitor. 



Summary 



The following chart summarizes all the preceding 
information on error chords. The left column lists the 
chords, and the right column lists the actions to be 
taken. 



Chord Sequences 



Actions 



Startup, Initial 
Test Monitor 



1. Replace logic board only. 

2. Perform SIMM verification on customer's logic 
board. 



Startup, RAM 1, 
Test Monitor 



1. Perform SIMM verification of Bank A, then of 
Bank B on customer's logic board. 

2. Replace logic board only. 

3. Perform SIMM verification on a replacement logic 
board. 






..Continued on next page 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.9 



Startup, RAM 2, 
Test Monitor 



1. Perform SIMM verification of Bank A, then of 
Bank B on customer's logic board. 

2. Replace logic board only. 

3. Perform SIMM verification on replacement logic 
board. 



i 






4.10 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






□ SYMPTOM CHART 



Video Problems Solutions 



• Screen is dark, audio 
and drive operate, 
fan is running, and 
LED is lit 



1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 



7. 
8, 
9. 



Adjust brightness on monitor. 

Replace monitor. 

Replace video cable. 

Move video interface to a different slot. 

Replace video interface card (refer to Macintosh 

Family Cards Technical Procedures). 

Make sure ROM jumper is on (refer to Section 1, 

Basics). 

Replace SIMMs (refer to "SIMM Verification"). 

Replace logic board. 

Replace power supply. 






Screen dark, no audio, 
no drive, but fan is 
running and LED 
is lit 



1. Replace video cable. 

2. Move video interface to a different slot. 

3. Replace video interface card (refer to Macintosh 
Family Cards Technical Procedures). 

4. Make sure ROM jumper is on (refer to Section 1, 
Basics). 

5. Replace SIMMs (refer to "SIMM Verification"). 

6. Replace logic board. 

7. Replace power supply. 

8. Replace monitor. 



Partial or whole 1. 

screen is bright and 2. 

audio is present, but 3. 

no video information 4. 
is visible 



Replace monitor. 

Replace video cable. 

Move video interface to a different slot. 

Replace video interface card (refer to Macintosh 

Family Cards Technical Procedures). 

Replace logic board only. 



Screen is completely 
dark, fan is not 
running, and LED is 
not lit 



1. Plug the monitor directly into the wall socket, and 
verify that the monitor has power. 

2. Replace power supply. 

3. Replace logic board only. 

Note: If replacing the monitor will correct the 
problem, refer to the appropriate Technical Procedures 
to obtain replacement information. 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.11 



Drive Problems 



Solutions 



i 



Audio and video 
present, but 
internal drive 
does not operate 



1. 

2. 



5. 
6. 



Replace bad disk. 

Verify that all external SCSI devices are 

disconnected. 

Replace internal disk drive cable. 

Replace internal disk drive. 

Replace logic board only. 

Replace power supply. 



Disk ejects; display 
shows icon with 
blinking "X" 



1. Replace disk with known-good system disk. 

2. Replace internal disk drive cable. 

3. Replace internal disk drive. 

4. Replace logic board only. 



Will not eject 
disk 



1. Switch off system and hold mouse button down 
while switching on. 

2. Replace disk drive. 



Attempts to eject 
disk, but doesn't 



- Reinsert disk. 



SCSI Problems 



Solutions 



Internal disk drive 
runs continuously 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Replace internal disk drive cable. 

3. Replace internal disk drive. 

4. Replace logic board only. 



Internal hard disk 
will not operate 



1. Replace SCSI cable connector. 

2. Replace SCSI power connector. 

3. Replace hard disk. 

4. Replace logic board only. 



Works with internal or 
external SCSI device 
but will not work 
with both 



1. Verify that SCSI select level switch on external 
device is set to a different priority. 

2. Replace terminator on the external device. 

3. Verify terminator is installed on the internal SCSI 
drive. 

4. Replace SCSI device select cable. 






4.12 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






Peripheral Problems 



Solutions 



Cursor does not move 



1. Check mouse connection. 

2. If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to a 
rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, keyboard 
should be replaced. 

3. If mouse does not work in any ADB port, replace 
mouse. 

4. Replace logic board only. 



Cursor moves, but 1. 

clicking the mouse 2. 

button has no effect 



Replace mouse. 

Replace logic board only. 






Cannot double-click 
to open an application, 
disk, or server 



1. Remove any multiple system files on the hard disk. 

2. Clear parameter RAM. Hold down the 
<Shift><Option><Command> keys and select 
Control Panel from the Apple menu. Reset mouse 
controls. 

3. If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to a 
rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, keyboard 
should be replaced. 

4. If mouse does not work in any ADB port, replace 
mouse. 

5. Replace main logic board. 



No response to any 
key on the keyboard 



1. Check keyboard connection to ADB port. 

2. Replace keyboard cable. 

3. Replace keyboard. 

4. Replace logic board only. 



Known-good 
I mage Writer or 
Image Writer II 
will not print 



1. Make sure System 6.0.3 and Finder 6.1 (or higher) 
are used. 

2. Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 
are set correctly. 

3. Replace printer interface cable. 

4. Replace logic board only. 






...Continued on next page 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.13 



Known-good 1. Make sure System 6.0.3 and Finder 6.1 (or higher) 

LaserWriter are used. 

will not print 2. Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 

are set correctly. 
3. Refer to the Networks tab in the Apple Service 
Technical Procedures for more information. 



■ 



4.14 / Troubleshooting Mar 89 Macintosh Ilex 






Miscellaneous Problems Solutions 



Clicking, chirping, 1. 

or thumping sound 2. 



Replace power supply. 
Replace logic board only. 



System shuts down 
intermittently 



1. 



2. 
3. 

4 



Make sure air vents on the back side and top of the 
main unit are kept clear. Thermal protection 
circuitry may shut down the system. After 30 to 40 
minutes, the system should be OK. 
Replace power cable. 
Replace power supply. 
Replace logic board only. 



System intermittently 
crashes or locks up 



1. Make sure System 6.0.3 and Finder 6.1 (or higher) 
are being used. 

2. Make sure software is known-good. 

3. Replace logic board only. 

4. Replace SIMMs (refer to "SIMM Verification"). 

5. Replace power supply. 






• No sound from 
speaker 



1. Verify that the volume setting in the Control Panel 
is set to 1 or above. 

2. Replace speaker. 

3. Replace logic board only. 



System intermittently 
doesn't power on 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 



7. 



Check cables. 

Plug the monitor directly into the wall socket, and 

verify that the monitor has power. 

Try a known-good keyboard and ADB cable. 

Replace power cord. 

Check batteries (refer to "Battery Verification"). 

Unplug the power cord from the system for 

approximately 5 to 10 minutes; plug the power cord 

back in and turn on the system. If the system starts 

up normally, replace the power supply. 

Replace logic board only. 



Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Aug 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.15 



□ MACINTOSH Ilex FLOWCHARTS 



Flowchart 1 
Notes 



1. During a normal startup sequence, a medium 
pitched soft chord is emitted. If this does not 
happen, refer to "Startup and Error Chords" for 
additional information. If you cannot interpret the 
chords, continue with the flowchart. 



. 



2. If exchanging the monitor will correct the problem, 
refer to the Apple High-Res Monochrome Monitor, 
Apple High-Res RGB Monitor, or the Apple Two- 
Page Monochrome Monitor Technical Procedures to 
isolate the monitor problem to the module level. 

3. If exchanging the video interface card corrects the 
problem, refer to the Macintosh Family Cards 
Technical Procedures for information on 
troubleshooting the card. 

4. There are two steps to perform when exchanging 
the SIMM modules. Refer to "SIMM Verification" 
for complete instructions on verifying and 
troubleshooting the SIMMs. 

5. If the known-good SIMMs did not correct the 
problem, install the customer's SIMMs on the 
replacement logic board. 



4.16 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






( Start ) 

i 






Power on the system 
without installing a disk. 




^^^^ Is a normal^ s *v. 


•VNO 






^y^ startup sequence of ^ 
^^ chords issued? 
>. (See Note #1.) ^ 




Interpret error 

chords (see 

Note #1). 





,YES 



YES 




Goto 
Flow- 
chart 2. 



YES 



Goto 
Flow- 
chart 4A. 



Does the 

desktop or a disk icon 

with a flashing question 

mark appear? 



.NO 



Power off. If a hard disk is installed, 

disconnect the SCSI power connector 

and cable connector. 



i 



Power on the Macintosh Ilex system 
without installing a disk. 




Exchange video interface card 

(see Note #3). 
Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #5). 
Exchange SIMMs (see Note #4). 
Exchange power supply. 






c 



T 



1 . Exchange monitor (see Note #2). 

2. Exchange video cable. 

3. Exchange video interface card 

(see Note #3). 

4. Exchange SIMMs (see Note #4). 

5. Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #5). 

6. Exchange power supply. 



Go to Flowchart 4A. 



3 



C 



Go to Flowchart 3. 



j 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.17 



Flowchart 2 1. Refer to Section 3, Diagnostics, for complete 

Notes information. 

2. Refer to the SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures for complete instructions. 

3. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



i 



> 



4.18 / Troubleshooting Mar 89 Macintosh Ilex 









Shut down and install 

another MacTest Ilex 

disk. Power on. 




Power off. If a hard disk is installed, 

remove the SCSI power and cable 

connector, or any external drive. 



( Flowchart 2 ) 



Insert MacTest Ilex disk. Power on. 



NO 




Run MacTest Ilex (see Note #1). 



j 



Run Apple Hard Disk Test (see Note #2). 



i 



( END ) 



1 



Run MacTest ll/cx (see Note #1). 



Run Apple Hard Disk Test (see Note #2). 



i 




GD 



1. Exchange drive cable. 

2. Exchange drive . 

3. Exchange power supply. 
4. . Exchange logic board 

only (see Note #3). 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.19 



Flowcharts 
Notes 



1. If exchanging the monitor will correct the 

problem, refer to the Apple High-Res Monochrome 
Monitor, Apple High-Res RGB Monitor, or the Apple 
Two-Page Monochrome Monitor Technical 
Procedures to isolate the monitor problem to the 
module level. 



i 



2. If exchanging the video interface card corrects the 
problem, refer to the Macintosh Family Cards 
Technical Procedures for information on 
troubleshooting the card. 

3. There are two steps to perform when exchanging 
the SIMM modules. Refer to "SIMM Verification" 
for complete instructions on verifying and 
troubleshooting the SIMMs. 

4. If the known-good SIMMs did not correct the 
problem, install the customer's SIMMs on the 
replacement logic board. 

5. Exchange only the logic board by installing the 
customer's SIMMs on the replacement logic board. 



i 



4.20 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






( Flowchart3 ) 




YES 





NO 


. 


' 


1. Exchange monitor 


(see Note #1). 


2. Exchange video cable. 


3. Exchange video interface 


card (see Note #2). 


4. Exchange SIMMs 


(see Note #4). 


5. Exchange logic board 


(see Note #5). 


6. Exchange power supply. 



1 . Exchange power supply. 

2. Exchange logic board 

only (see Note #5). 


IF 


f Go to Flowchart 4A. 


) 






Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.21 



Flowchart 4 1. Refer to Section 3, Diagnostics, for complete 

Notes information. 

2. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



) 



4.22 / Troubleshooting Mar 89 Macintosh Ilex 






( Flowchart 4A ) 



Insert MacTest Ilex disk. Power on. 



C Flowchart 4B 




1. Exchange drive cable. 

2. Exchange disk drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #2). 



Run MacTest Ilex disk (see Note #1). 



c 



i 



Go to Flowchart 5. 



3 



i 






Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.23 



Flowchart 5 
Notes 



1. Refer to Section 3, Diagnostics, for complete 
information. 

2. Refer to SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures for complete instructions. 

3. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 

4. Customers must always get back the same system 
configurations they bring in. Refer to "Module 
Exchange Information." 



i 



) 






4.24 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



( Flowcharts ) 



Power off. Reconnect the 

SCSI drive (if Installed). 

Power on. 




1 . Exchange SCSI power and 

connector cable. 

2. Exchange SCSI drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #2). 



Insert MacTest Ilex disk. Power on. 




1 . Exchange SCSI power and 

connector cable. 

2. Exchange SCSI drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board only 

(see Note #2). 



Run MacTest Hex (see Note #1). 



I 



Run Apple Hard Disk Test (see Note #3). 



I 



Customer has correct configuration 
(see Note #4). 



■/ end") 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.25 



□ SIMM VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



The service exchange logic board comes without RAM 
SIMMs. 



Isolating to 
the Customer's 
SIMMs 



The SIMMs installed on the customer's logic board may 
be defective. To verify this, remove all of the 
customer's SIMMs and install known-good SIMMs. 
Mark each known-good SIMM with a dot of white 
correction fluid or a small sticker. Whatever you use, 
be sure it will not come off while you are testing. 



1. Remove the top cover . 



CAUTION: Before removing the SIMMs, be sure to use 
proper ESD procedures. If an ESD pad is not available, 
touch bare metal on the power supply before proceeding. 
Failure to do so can result in damage to the logic board. 

2. Remove the customer's SIMMs , using the SIMM 
removal tool. See You Oughta Know for SIMM tool 
usage. 

Note: Record the number and the sizes of the 
customer's SIMMs. The customer should get the 
same number and sizes back! Refer to Section 5, 
Additional Procedures, for information on 
identifying the SIMMs. 

3. Install the four known-good 256K SIMMs in Bank A 
(Figure 1, #1). 

4. Power on the system. 

5. Insert the MacTest Hex disk. 

If the test boots, run it. Then continue with the 
appropriate verification procedure. 

If the test does not boot, return to the appropriate 
flowchart. 



4.26 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Aug 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






□ E3q q cpci ~ 

ooo DDD ■—„ o 



o 




J\ 



m 

m 

•4m- 



fflBi n.: , 

OOOooock 

a o o o o B 



A 



J£ 



s* 7 * 11 ^ 



FIGURE 1 



Verification 



If the customer has 256K SIMMs or 1M SIMMs 
installed, you will need to verify all of them. Use the 
flowchart and referenced notes on the next two pages 
to perform the verification of the SIMMs. 



Materials Required 



If verifying 256K SIMMs, you will need four 256K 
known-good SIMMs. 

If verifying 1M SIMMs, you will need four 1M known- 
good SIMMs 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.27 



Verification 

Flowchart 

Notes 



1. Locate Bank A on the logic board and install 
three known-good SIMMs (Figure 1, #1). 

2. During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
soft chord is emitted; then a disk icon with a 
flashing question mark is displayed on the screen. 
If either of these things does not happen, refer to 
"Startup and Error Chords" for additional 
information. 



i 



3. Be sure to set the defective SIMM where it will not 
be mixed up with the others. 

4. Return to the beginning of the flowchart and 
perform the same procedure for Bank B 
(Figure 1, #2). 



) 



4.28 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



c 



Verification Flowchart 



i 



d 



Install three known-good 

SIMMs into Bank A 

(see Note #1). 



I 



Install one of the customer's SIMMs 
into the empty slot in Bank A. 



Remove another 
known-good 
marked SIMM. 




Power off the system. 

Remove and set aside the 

customer's bad SIMM 

(see Note #3). 



Repeat for Bank B (see Note #4). 



f END J 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.29 



□ BATTERY VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



There is one lithium battery on the Macintosh Ilex logic 
board. 

WARNING: Lithium batteries, the type used in the 
Macintosh Ilex, have some potential for explosion if 
improperly handled. Follow the procedure below exactly 
as written. 



Materials Required 



Voltmeter 



Verification 
Procedure 



To check the lithium battery with a voltmeter: 

1. Be sure power is off. Then remove the top lid . 

2. Set the voltmeter range to measure 10 volts DC. 

3. Touch and hold the positive probe of the voltmeter 
to the positive side of the battery (Figure 2, #1). 




) 



FIGURE 2 



4.30 / Troubleshooting 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






4. Touch and hold the ground probe of the voltmeter to 
the negative side of the battery. 

5. The reading for a good battery should be above 2.8 
volts. If the battery falls below 2.8 volts, replace it. 
Refer to Section 5, Additional Procedures, for 
replacement instructions. 






Macintosh Ilex Mar 89 Troubleshooting / 4.31 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Ilex 

Section 5 - Additional Procedures 



□ CONTENTS 








5.3 


Battery Replacement 




5.3 


Storage and Handling 




5.3 


Disposal 




5.6 


Logic Board RAM Identification and Upgrades 




5.6 


Introduction 




5.6 


Identification 




5.9 


Upgrades 




5.10 


Macintosh Ilex Upgrade to Macintosh Ilci 



Note: If a step is underlined, instructions for that step 
can be found in Section 2, Take-Apart. 






Macintosh Ilex rev. Nov 89 Additional Procedures / 5.1 






□ BATTERY REPLACEMENT 



WARNING: A lithium battery, the type used in the 
Macintosh Ilex, has some potential for explosion if 
improperly handled. ^_^ 



Storage and 
Handling 



Take the following precautions when storing and 
handling lithium batteries. 

• When Apple's lithium battery is shipped to you, it is 
sealed in an individual zip-lock wrapper. When you 
receive it, check to make sure the wrapper is intact. 
If it is not, mend the wrapper before you store the 
battery. 

• Store the battery in the packaging in which you 
received it. 

• The storage area for lithium batteries should be 
well marked, and access to the area should be 
restricted. 






Disposal 



Lithium batteries cannot be recharged and will require 
disposal when "dead." But you cannot throw them away 
as you would other batteries because lithium is water- 
reactive, in addition to being potentially explosive. 
Lithium batteries must be disposed of as hazardous 
waste. 

WARNING: "Dead" lithium batteries are considered 
hazardous waste and must be returned to Apple in their 
original packaging for disposal following EPA guidelines. 



Because of this hazard, Apple recommends the following 
course of action: 

After removing a "dead" battery from a board, place the 
battery in the zip-lock wrapper and original packaging 
from which the replacement battery was taken. Mark 
the battery DEAD and return it to Apple, where it will 
be disposed of following EPA guidelines. 

The long-life lithium battery in the Macintosh Ilex 
should serve about seven years. Refer to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, to check the condition of the battery. 
But if the battery should fail for some reason, replace it 
according to the following procedure. 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Additional Procedures / 5.3 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench and wriststrap 



CAUTION: Use ESD precautions before removing or 
replacing the battery. Failure to do so may result in logic 
board failure. 



. 



Remove 



1. Remove the logic board . 

2. Locate the battery holder (Figure 1, #1) and battery 
(Figure 1, #2) on the front of the logic board. 




FIGURE 1 

3. Gently squeeze either end of the holder and lift up. 
As that side becomes loose, do the same on the 
other end and remove the cover from the holder. 

4. Grasp the battery between the thumb and fore- 
finger and lift out the battery. 



5.4 / Additional Procedures 



Mar 89 



Macintosh Ilex 






Replace 1. Insert the new battery so the positive side of the 

battery is inserted into the positive-marked side of 
the holder (Figure 1, #3), the side toward the LED. 



CAUTION: Be sure the positive side of the battery is in the 
correct location (see Figure 1, #3). An incorrectly placed 
battery can damage the logic board. 

2. Replace the logic board . 

3. Set the clock using the Control Panel. 



Macintosh Ilex Mar 89 Additional Procedures / 5.5 



□ LOGIC BOARD RAM IDENTIFICATION AND UPGRADES 



Introduction 



RAM for the Macintosh Ilex is provided in packages 
known as Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs). A 
SIMM is a circuit board 3.5-inches long and from 
5/8-inch to one-inch high. SIMMs have memory chips 
that are either surface mounted or mounted through the 
board. Each SIMM board has pins (or legs) that fit into 
sockets on the logic board. 

CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to damage from 
ESP and skin acid Handle only by the edges! 



Identification 



The SIMMs are available with two sizes of RAM — 256K 
and 1 MB — and come in several configurations that can 
be used interchangeably. 



Speed 



You must use 120 ns (or faster) SIMMs on the 
Macintosh Ilex. Slower SIMMs (e.g., 150 ns) will cause 
serious timing problems. The RAM speed is usually 
indicated by the -xx number after the manufacturer's 
part number. For example, -12 indicates 120 ns SIMMs 
and -15 indicates 150 ns SIMMs. 



Note: When you are removing SIMMs from the logic 
board, use the SIMM removal tool. Instructions for 
using this tool are located in You Oughta Know. 



256K SIMMs 



The 256K SIMMs come in four configurations: 

• 256K DIP SIMM, 8 IC (Figure 2, #1) 

The 256K DIP (Dual In-line Package) SIMM, 8 IC, 
contains eight ICs mounted through the printed 
circuit board. Each IC has eight pins (or legs) on 
each of two sides. 

• 256K PLCC SIMM (Figure 2, #2) 

The 256K PLCC (Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier) SIMM 
contains eight surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has five 
pins (or legs) on each of two sides and four pins (or 
legs) on each of the other two sides. 

• 256K SOJ SIMM (Figure 2, #3) 

The 256K SOJ (Single Out-line JLead) SIMM 
contains two surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has ten 
pins (or legs) on each of two sides. 



5.6 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 






256K DIP SIMM, 2 IC (Figure 2, #4) 
The 256K DIP (Dual In-line Package) SIMM, 2 IC, 
contains two ICs mounted through the printed 
circuit board. Each IC has ten pins (or legs) on each 
of two sides. 



DDDDOI 




n nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn n n nnnn nnn n 




D UUUUUUUU ° 

nnnnmnnnn n n n nnn f in n nnnnn nr in nn n 




.nnnnn nnnnn 

P 1 

1 uuuuu — uuuuu ' 



ripnnn nnnnn 

'uuuuu — uuuuu' 




n nnnnnnn n nn nnn rin nn nn n nn nn n nn r i n 






.nnnnnnnnnn, 



nnnnnnnnnn 



° j i r__j ° 

nnnn n nnnnn n nnnn nn nnn nnnnnn n nn n 




FIGURE 2 






Macintosh Ilex 



rev. Jan 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.7 



1 MB SIMMs 



The 1 MB SIMMs come in two configurations: 



1 MB DIP SIMM (Figure 3, #1) 

The 1 xMB DIP (Dual In-line Package) SIMM contains 
eight ICs mounted through the printed circuit board. 
Each IC has nine pins (or legs) on each of two sides. 

1 MB SOJ SIMM (Figure 3, #2) 
The 1 MB SOJ (Single Out-line JLead) SIMM 
contains eight surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has ten 
pins (or legs) on each of two sides. 



o l 



1 C 3 C 3 



C I C } C 3 C 3 C 3 




nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 



! Bi U H ! 




Li 




nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 



FIGURE 3 



IMPORTANT: Mitsubishi 1 MB SIMMs for the Macintosh 
Ilex, which are labeled "For 030 Systems Only, " should be 
used only in systems with 68030 microprocessors. 



5.8 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilex 






Upgrades 



Various RAM upgrades are possible on the Macintosh 
Ilex, depending on the number and size of the SIMMs 
that you install on the logic board. 



For installation purposes, two banks of SIMM sockets 
are located on the logic board and are labeled Bank A 
and Bank B (see Figure 4). Each bank contains four 
slots, which are grouped into twos. All four slots 
within a bank must be filled with SIMMs of the same 
RAM size. 







FIGURE 4 

The following chart summarizes the various 
configurations that the Macintosh Ilex will support: 



RAM 


Bank A 


BankB 


1M 


Four 256K SIMMs 


Empty 


2M 


Four 256K SIMMs 


Four 256K SIMMs 


4M 


Four 1M SIMMs 


Empty 


5M 


Four 1M SIMMs 


Four 256K SIMMs 


8M 


Four 1M SIMMs 


Four 1M SIMMs 


CAUTION: Other configurations, such as a single SIMM or 
a pair of differently sized SIMMs, will not function correctly. 



Macintosh Ilex 



Mar 89 



Additional Procedures / 5.9 



□ MACINTOSH Ilex UPGRADE TO MACINTOSH llci 



Use this procedure to upgrade a Macintosh Ilex to a 
Macintosh llci. Making the change involves changing 
the logic board, RAM SIMMs, bottom case, and the HDA 
power cable as explained below. 



i 



Materials 
Required 



Phillips screwdriver 
RAM SIMM removal tool 
Macintosh llci Upgrade Kit 
Macintosh Ilex Technical Procedures 
Macintosh llci Technical Procedures 



Procedure 



Upgrading a Macintosh Ilex to a Macintosh llci involves 
the use of the Macintosh llci Upgrade Kit. The kit 
includes a llci logic board, 1 MB of 80 ns fast page 
mode RAM SIMMs, a new bottom case, and a new HDA 
power cable. You must first take apart the Ilex by 
following the technical procedures for the Ilex and then 
rebuild the new unit using the llci technical 
procedures. The major differences are 

• The llci logic board has a slighly different layout 
and also a new connector (video port). 

• A new bottom case accommodates the new video port 
connector. 

• The llci requires new, faster RAM SIMMs. 
Therefore, you cannot use the RAM SIMMs from the 
Ilex (120 ns); you must use 80 ns fast page mode 
RAM SIMMs in the llci. 

• A new HDA (hard disk) power cable is used to 
accommodate the new connector on the logic board. 



Take Apart 



1. Remove the Macintosh Hex logic board (see the 
Macintosh Ilex Technical Procedures). Return the 
logic board to Apple. 



2. Using the SIMM removal tool, remove the RAM 
SIMMs from the logic board and give them to the 
customer. The RAM SIMMs in the Ilex are 120 ns, 
which cannot be used in the llci. 






5.10 / Additional Procedures 



Nov 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



3. Discard the bottom case. (You need not return the 
bottom case to Apple.) 



Rebuild 1. From the Ilci Upgrade Kit, insert the Ilci logic 

board into the new bottom case. (Use the Macintosh 
Ilci Technical Procedures.) 

2. Insert the new RAM SIMMs into the Ilci logic board. 
These RAM SIMMs have to be 80 ns fast page mode 
SIMMs to work correctly in the Ilci. 

CAUTION: You cannot use the 120 ns RAM SIMMs from 
the Ilex. If you do, the new Ilci will not function correctly. 

Note: Unlike the requirements for the Ilex, it is not 
mandatory to have the larger RAM SIMMs in bank A 
in the Ilci. You may put the larger RAM SIMMs in 
bank A or bank B; however, keep in mind that if 
built-in video is going to be used, bank A must have 
RAM SIMMs installed. 

3. Using the Macintosh Ilci technical procedures, 
install the speaker, disks, disk carrier (using new 
disk power cable), power supply, and 
reset/interrupt switch. 

Note: If the unit contains a hard drive, the hard 
drive light pipe from the old Macintosh Ilex case 
must be transferred to the Macintosh Ilci bottom 
case. 



Macintosh Ilex rev. Jan 90 Additional Procedures / 5.11 



« Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Ilex 

Illustrated Parts List 



□ CONTENTS 



IPL.3 Macintosh Ilex — System Exploded 

View (Figure 1) 
IPL.5 Macintosh Ilex — Logic Board (Figure 2) 



The figures and lists in this section include all piece 
parts that can be purchased separately from Apple for the 
Macintosh Ilex, along with their part numbers. These 
are the only parts available from Apple. Refer to your 
Apple Service Programs manual for prices. 



Macintosh Ilex rev. Nov 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.1 



• 




© <© 



) 



FIGURE 1 



IPL2/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Jun 90 



Macintosh Ilex 






□ MACINTOSH Ilex— SYSTEM EXPLODED VIEW (Figure 1) 

Item Part No. Description 

Screw, M 3.5 x .6 x 8 (Top Cover, Drive Carrier to 

Bottom Case) 
Cable, Internal HDA Power 
Cable, Internal HDA Power (2x2 Pin) 
Cable, Internal HDA 
Bracket, Power Supply Fan 
Power Supply Fan 

Screw, 6-32 x .250 (HDA to HDA Bracket) 
Power Supply with Fan 
On-Off Button 
Logic Board (without RAM; replaces part number 

661-0459) 
Bottom Case 
Light Pipe, Power On 
Cable, Power AC (smoke) 
Rubber Feet 
Light Pipe, HDA 
Cable, HDA LED (amber) 
Screw, Socket, Phillips (1.4 MB Mechanism) 
Shield, Internal 1.4 MB Mechanism 
Reset/Interrupt Switch 

1.4 MB Mechanism, Apple FDHD/SuperDrive 
Cable, Internal 1.4 MB Mechanism 
Drive Carrier 
Speaker 

Speaker Bracket 
HDA, Internal 3.5 SCSI, 20 MB 
HDA, Internal 3.5 SCSI, 40 MB 
HDA, Internal 3.5 SCSI, 80 MB with A/UX, v. 1.1 

(replaced by 661-0613) 
HDA, Internal 3.5 SCSI, 80 MB 
HDA, Internal 3.5 SCSI, 80 MB with A/UX, v.2.0 
Bracket, HDA, Mounting 
Top Cover 



1 


416-1412 


2 


590-0505 




590-0512 


3 


590-0609 


4 


815-5071 


5 


982-0023 


6 


444-6104 


7 


661-0467 


8 


815-6033 


9 


661-0537 


10 


630-5502 


11 


815-6032 


12 


590-0380 


13 


865-0026 


14 


815-6036 


15 


590-0506 


16 


844-0018 


17 


805-0961 


18 


815-6034 


19 


661-0474 


20 


590-0607 


21 


815-6030 


22 


630-5503 


23 


815-6031 


24 


661-0373 




661-0464 




661-0561 




661-0600 




661-0613 


25 


805-5078 


26 


810-6028 



Macintosh Ilex rev. Oct 90 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.3 



ni in ,p i i 



lo^moj jflT^ 




FIGURE 2 



IPL4/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Oct 89 



Macintosh Ilex 



□ MACINTOSH Ilex— LOGIC BOARD (Figure 2) 
item Part No. Description 



1 


742-0011 


Lithium Battery (without Leads) 


2 


520-0344 


Battery Holder Cover 


3 


661-0402 


SIMM, 256K, 120 ns 




661-0494 


SIMM, DIP, 256K, 120 ns 




661-0403 


SIMM, 1 MB, 120 ns 




661-0410 


SIMM, DIP, 1 MB, 120 ns 



Macintosh Ilex rev. Oct 89 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.5 






# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llci 

Technical Procedures 



□ TABLE OF CONTENTS 




Section 1 - 


1.3 


Product Description 


Basics 


1.3 


New Features 




1.3 


Macintosh llci Configurations 




1.5 


Connector Identification 




1.5 


Back Panel 




1.6 


Internal Connectors 




1.7 


Module Identification 




1.8 


Macintosh llci System Features 




1.8 


Macintosh llci Logic Board 




1.10 


Apple FDHD Drive 




1.14 


Specifications 




1.17 


Theory of Operation 




1.17 


Introduction 




1.17 


System Startup 




1.19 


Logic Board 




1.22 


Input/Output Interface 




1.26 


Real-Time Clock 




1.26 


NuBus Interface 




1.27 


Cache Connector 




1.28 


Parity 




1.28 


Power Control 




1.29 


Power Supply 




1.29 


Fuses 




1.29 


Internal Floppy Disk Drives 




1.30 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 


Section 2 - 


2.2 


Electrostatic Discharge Prevention 


Take-Apart 


2.3 


Top Lid 




2.4 


Interface Cards 




2.5 


Speaker Bracket and Speaker 




2.8 


Power Supply 




2.10 


Fan Bracket and Fan 




2.12 


Hard Disk Drive 




2.16 


Disk Drive Carrier and Floppy Disk Drive 




2.21 


Reset/Interrupt Switch 




2.22 


Main Logic Board 



Macintosh llci 



rev. Apr 91 



Contents / i 



Section 3 - 


3.2 


Introduction to MacTest Ilcx/IIci 


Diagnostics 


3.3 


Copying the Disk 




3.3 


Using Your Backup Disk 




3.4 


Running MacTest Ilcx/IIci 




3.4 


Starting MacTest Ilcx/IIci 




3.5 


Helpful Startup Information 




3.6 


Installing the Loopbacks 




3.7 


Using the MacTest Ilcx/IIci Menus 




3.12 


Running the Tests 




3.14 


Diagnostic Sound Sampler 




3.14 


Introduction 




3.14 


Procedure 




3.15 


Introduction to AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci 




3.16 


Running AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci 




3.16 


Setting Up the Test Station and UUT 




3.18 


Establishing Communication 




3.19 


Using the AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci Menus 




3.22 


Running the Tests 




3.24 


Helpful Suggestions 




3.25 


SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure 




3.25 


Determining If a Jumper Is Needed 




3.25 


Identifying a New Card 




3.26 


External Jumpers on Old Cards 




3.26 


Summary 




3.26 


Installing the Jumper 


Section 4 - 


4.3 


Introduction 


Troubleshooting 


4.3 


General Information 




4.3 


Before You Start 




4.3 


Error Chords 




4.3 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 




4.4 


How to Use the Troubleshooting Flowcharts 




4.5 


Things to Remember 




4.7 


Module Exchange Information 




4.7 


Logic Board Configuration 




4.7 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 




4.7 


Macintosh Ilci Cache Card 




4.8 


Startup and Error Chords 




4.8 


Introduction 




4.8 


Startup Chord 




4.8 


Error Chords 




4.9 


Symptom Chart 




4.9 


Built-in Video Problems 




4.10 


Floppy Drive Problems 




4.10 


SCSI Problems 




4.11 


Peripheral Problems 




4.13 


Miscellaneous Problems 



ii / Contents 



rev. Apr 91 



Macintosh Ilci 





4.14 


Macintosh Ilci Flowcharts 




4.14 


Flowchart 1 Notes 




4.16 


Flowchart 2 Notes 




4.18 


Flowchart 3 Notes 




4.19 


Flowchart 4 Notes 




4.20 


Flowchart 5 Notes 




4.22 


SIMM Verification 




4.22 


Introduction 




4.22 


Isolating to the Customer's SIMMs 




4.23 


Verification 




4.24 


Verification Flowchart Notes 




4.26 


Battery Verification 




4.26 


Introduction 




4.26 


Verification Procedure 


Section 5 - 


5.3 


Battery Replacement 


Additional Procedures 


5.3 


Storage and Handling 




5.3 


Disposal 




5.6 


Logic Board RAM Identification and Upgrades 




5.6 


Introduction 




5.6 


Identification 




5.7 


Upgrades 






Illustrated 
Parts List 



IPL.3 Macintosh Ilci — System Exploded View 

(Figure 1) 
IPL.5 Macintosh Ilci — Logic Board (Figure 2) 
IPL.5 Macintosh Ilci — Logic Board with Parity 

(Figure 3) 
IPL.7 Macintosh Ilci — Cache Card (Figure 4) 



Atofe; The labels FDHD and FDHD/SuperDrive refer to 
the same product. 



©Apple Computer, Inc., 1989, 1990, 1991. No portion of this document may be reproduced in 

any form without the written permission of Apple Computer, Inc. 
MacTest, FDHD, Apple Desktop Bus, and SuperDrive are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 
Macintosh, AppleCAT, A/UX, AppleTalk, EtherTalk, Apple, and the Apple logo are registered 

trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. 
UNIX® is a registered trademark of UNIX System Laboratories. 
NuBus™ is a trademark of Texas Instruments. 



Macintosh Ilci 



rev. Apr 91 



Contents / iii 






« Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llci 

Section 1 - Basics 






□ CONTENTS 








1.3 


Product Description 




1.3 


New Features 




1.3 


Macintosh llci Configurations 




1.5 


Connector Identification 




1.5 


Back Panel 




1.6 


Internal Connectors 




1.7 


Module Identification 




1.8 


Macintosh llci System Features 




1.8 


Macintosh llci Logic Board 




1.10 


Apple FDHD Drive 




1.14 


Specifications 




1.17 


Theory of Operation 




1.17 


Introduction 




1.17 


System Startup 




1.19 


Logic Board 




1.22 


Input/Output Interface 




1.26 


Real-Time Clock 




1.26 


NuBus Interface 




1.27 


Cache Connector 




1.28 


Parity 




1.28 


Power Control 




1.29 


Power Supply 




1.29 


Fuses 




1.29 


Internal Floppy Disk Drives 




1.30 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 



Macintosh llci 



Sep 89 



Basics/ 1.1 



□ PRODUCT DESCRIPTION 



The Macintosh® Ilci is a high-performance, open- 
architecture Macintosh computer with enhanced 
functionality. It is designed to run existing software 
while providing the power, flexibility, and 
expandability necessary for future applications. 



New Features 



The Macintosh Ilci has the following features: 

• Increased speed — 25 MHz (true 32-bit support) 

• Built-in video support 

• Parity support (optional) 

• 512K of ROM 

• RAM cache connector 



Macintosh Ilci 
Configurations 



The Macintosh Ilci comes in a variety of configurations. 
Below are four configurations that are offered. These 
are not the only possible configurations. Because of the 
flexibility of this unit, you may see units with different 
amounts of RAM and with other SCSI 3.5-inch hard disk 
drives. Presented here are basic configurations and 
some of the limitations. 



Floppy-Only 
Systems 



The floppy-only system includes the following elements: 

• 1 megabyte (MB) of RAM 

• One Apple FDHD drive 

(Floppy Disk High Density, 1.4 MB Drive) 



Hard Disk Systems 



The hard disk systems include the following elements: 

The 1 MB system with a 40 MB HDA: 

• 1 MB of RAM 

• One Apple FDHD drive 

(Floppy Disk High Density, 1.4 MB Drive) 

• 40 MB SCSI internal hard disk 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Basics / 1 .3 



I 



The 4 MB system with an 80 MB HDA: 

• 4 MB of RAM 

• One Apple FDHD drive 

(Floppy Disk High Density, 1.4 MB Drive) 

• 80 MB SCSI internal hard disk 

The 4 MB system with A/UX®: 

• 4 MB of RAM 

• One Apple FDHD drive 

(Floppy Disk High Density, 1.4 MB Drive) 

• 80 MB SCSI + A/UX (Apple UNIX®) on a special 
internal hard disk 

The 4 MB system with parity: 

• 4 MB of RAM 

• One Apple FDHD drive 

(Floppy Disk High Density, 1.4 MB Drive) 

• 80 MB SCSI internal hard disk 

Note: The limitation of the 1 MB system is that the 
built-in video uses 320K of memory to support a 
640 x 480 screen at 8 bits/pixel (and 640 x 870 at 
4 bits/pixel); therefore, the system will default to 
1 bit/pixel. This leaves 680K of memory available for 
application use. 

Note: The RAM cache slot is not compatible with the 
SE/30 direct slot. 



Enhancements The following enhancements can be added to any of the 

systems: 

• 800K, 3.5-inch external disk drive or external 1.4 
MB FDHD (the Macintosh Ilci will not support the 
HD20, or any 400K drives) 

• 1 to 8 MB of RAM (up to 128 MB when larger 
DRAMs become available) 

• Any Apple 20, 40, or 80 MB (or larger, within 
limits) 3.5-inch internal SCSI hard disk drive 

• Up to 6 external SCSI devices of any size or kind 

• Macintosh Ilci Cache Card containing 32K of static 
RAM 



IMPORTANT: To maintain system functionality, A/UX 
customers planning to use the Macintosh Ilci and/or Apple 
FDHD drive must upgrade A/UX software to at least 
version 1.0.1. 



1 .4 / Basics rev. Jul 90 Macintosh Ilci 



□ CONNECTOR IDENTIFICATION 



Back 
Panel 



The back panel of the Macintosh Ilci has eight built-in 
ports and two connectors, as listed below. The number 
beside the item below corresponds to the numbered 
arrow in Figure 1. 



1. Apple Desktop Bus™ 1 and 2 

2. Stereo sound port 

3. Serial port 2 

4. Serial port 1 

5. Video port 

6. SCSI port 

7. External disk drive connector 

8. Locking power switch 

9. AC power connector 

10. Switched (courtesy) monitor connector 




FIGURE 1 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Basics / 1 .5 



Internal 
Connectors 



The Macintosh Ilci logic board has nine connectors and 
one jumper. In the list below, the number beside the 
connector or jumper name corresponds to the numbered 
arrow in Figure 2. 



i 



1. Power supply connector for the logic board 

2. Internal SCSI connector 

3. Power connector for internal SCSI 

4. Internal disk drive connector 

5. RAM SIMM connectors 

6. Speaker connector 

7. ROM jumper 

8. NuBus slots 

9. ROM SIMM connector 
10. Cache card connector 




FIGURE 2 






1 .6 / Basics 



Sep 89 



Macintosh Ilci 



□ MODULE IDENTIFICATION 




FIGURE 3 
Module Components 



Macintosh I lei 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 


Top lid 

Fan bracket 

Fan 

Power supply 

Logic board 

Outer case 

Power lamp lens 

Sep 


89 


8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 


Diode light assembly 
Programmer's switch 
Floppy disk 
Speaker 

Speaker bracket 
Disk carrier 
Hard disk 

Basics / 1 .7 



□ MACINTOSH llci SYSTEM FEATURES 



I 



The Macintosh llci is an enhanced-performance 
Macintosh Ilex that includes the following new or 
upgraded components: 



Motorola 68030 microprocessor running at 25 MHz 

512K of ROM 

RBV (RAM-Based Video chip) 

MDU (Memory Decode Unit) 

Nu-Chip 30 (NuBus controller chip) 

NuBus Transceivers (NuBus support chips) 

Cache Card connector 

PGC (Parity-Generating Chip) (special orders) 



Macintosh llci 
Logic Board 



At the heart of the Macintosh llci is the Motorola 
68030 microprocessor (Figure 4, #1). The 68030 is a 
true 32-bit microprocessor that is fully compatible with 
earlier 16- and 24-bit Macintosh microprocessors. This 
high-performance microprocessor runs at 25 MHz and is 
designed to handle paged memory management, thereby 
eliminating the HMMU (or PMMU). With this increased 
speed, and by taking advantage of the 68030 burst 
access capability (which enables the CPU to read groups 
of instructions or data in fewer clock cycles than in 
normal access mode), the Macintosh llci delivers 
significantly higher performance than the existing 
Macintosh systems. 

The Macintosh llci logic board includes four 128K x 8 
bits in 32-pin DIP soldered-in 512K ROM (Figure 4, #2). 
It also contains a 64-pin SIMM (Single In-line Memory 
Module) socket (Figure 4, #3) that allows for future 
ROM upgrades to the Macintosh llci without changing 
the main logic board. These ROM chips include code 
that supports the built-in video, parity, virtual memory 
(used on A/UX systems), and 32-bit QuickDraw™. The 
code supports future upgrades to the Macintosh 
Operating System. 

Note: When a new ROM SIMM is installed, the 
existing DIP ROM will not have to be removed from 
the board. For the new ROM to be recognized, it will 
just be a matter of removing a jumper (Figure 4, #4) on 
the logic board. 






1 .8 / Basics 



Sep 89 



Macintosh llci 










FIGURE 4 



Having the RBV (RAM-Based Video) chip (Figure 4, #5) 
on the logic board enables the Macintosh Ilci to drive a 
640 x 480 screen at up to 8 bits/pixel and a 640 x 870 
screen at up to 4 bits/pixel without the need for a 
video card. The chip uses a section of the RAM as a 
screen frame and retrieves the video data, which is 
then converted for display by a video DAC (digital-to- 
analog converter) and sent out through the DB-15 video 
port. 

For decoding address space, a new chip called the MDU 
(Memory Decode Unit) has been added (Figure 4, #6). 
The chip decodes device selection for the physical 
address map, and addresses both banks of RAM memory. 
Unlike earlier Macintosh units, this allows larger 
amounts of memory to be installed in bank B. 

The NuChip 30 chip (Figure 4, #7) is a new version of 
the NuBus chip (Macintosh Ilex). It is a controller chip 
that controls the NuBus transceivers through which data 
transfers to and from the NuBus slots. 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Basics / 1 .9 



The new cache connector (Figure 4, #8) allows the use 
of a cache card. The use of a cache card increases the 
effective speed of the main memory by providing the 
CPU with a copy of the most frequently used data more 
quickly than the memory that the cache supports. The 
cache stores the most recently accessed data and 
instructions in a small bank of high-speed memory, 
which the CPU can access faster. 

CAUTION: The cache slot is not compatible with the 
SE/30 direct slot. Trying to use an SE/30 direct board in 
the cache slot will result in damage to the main logic 
board and the direct board. 

The last of the new features on the Macintosh Ilci is 
the ability to have parity checking if the Macintosh Ilci 
is a special-order unit. If the system has parity 
checking, it will have a PGC (Parity-Generating Chip — 
Figure 4, #9) installed on the logic board and will also 
have special 9-bit parity SIMMs installed in the RAM 
SIMM sockets. The PGC will generate an extra bit of 
information for each byte of information stored in 
memory so that the total number of "on" bits add to an 
ODD number. When the data is read from memory, the 
byte is checked to determine whether the data has been 
corrupted (does the byte still add to an odd number of 
"on bits"?). If so, the system is halted and a restart 
must be done. 

The SWIM chip (Figure 4, #10) enables the Apple FDHD 
drive to read and write both GCR (Group-Coded 
Recording) and MFM (Modified Frequency Modulation) 
data formats. 



Apple FDHD The Apple FDHD drive is a high-density (1.4 MB), 3.5- 

Drive inch disk drive for the Macintosh Ilci system. In 

addition to high-capacity data storage, the Apple FDHD 
drive provides data exchangeability between Apple 
(GCR data format) and MS-DOS (MFM data format) 
systems. The Apple FDHD. drive is also fully backward- 
compatible with the current 400K and 800K disk 
formats. 



1.10/ Basics Sep 89 Macintosh Ilci 



Identification 



The Apple FDHD drive cannot be distinguished from 
400K and 800K format disk drives. However, since the 
Apple FDHD drive is the only drive supported 
internally, you should not have any problem. If you 
suspect that an 800K drive has been installed 
internally, you can tell by removing the top lid and 
locating the microswitches (Figure 5, #1) at the front of 
the drive. The Apple FDHD drive has three 
microswitches; the 800K drive has only two 
microswitches. 




FIGURE 5 

You can also identify an Apple FDHD drive by removing 
it from the Macintosh Ilci and checking the 
manufacturer's label (Figure 6) on the bottom of the 
drive: all high-density drives have the note 2MB on 
the label. 




FIGURE 6 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Basics/ 1.11 



CAUTION: High-density media are more likely to have 
problems than low-density media. To avoid media-related 
problems, use only known-good media or high -density 
media bearing the Apple label. 



High-Density 



The Apple FDHD drive can read, write, and format 400K 
and 800K media data disks. However, special high- 
density, 3.5-inch disks that take full advantage of the 
increased capacity of the Apple FDHD drive are also 
available. To avoid media-related problems when using 
the Apple FDHD drive, Apple advises using high- 
density media bearing the Apple label. 

As shown in the drive and media compatibility matrix 
(Figure 7), 400K drives can read, write, and format both 
single-sided media and double-sided media (in 400K 
format only). The 800K drives can also read, write, and 
format both single- and double-sided media. However, 
Apple does not recommend using high-density media in 
either 400K or 800K disk drives. Data saved to high- 
density media using 400K or 800K drives is unreliable 
and could be lost later. The Apple FDHD drives can 
read, write, and format single-sided, double-sided, and 
high-density media. In addition, Apple FDHD drives can 
read, write, and format 720K and 1.4 MB double-sided 
IBM (MFM) format media. 



Drive 


Media 


FORMAT 


400K(GCR) 


800K(GCR) 


720K(MFM) 


1.4 MB (MFM) 


400K 
400K 
400K 


Single-Sided 
Double-Sided 
High-Density 


R/W/F 

R/W/F 

NR 


X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 


800K 
800K 
800K 


Single-Sided 
Double-Sided 
High-Density 


R/W/F 

R/W/F 

NR 


NR 

R/W/F 

NR 


X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 


FDHD 
FDHD 
FDHD 


Single-Sided 

Double-Sided 

High-Density 


R/W/F 

R/W/F 

X 


NR 

R/W/F 

X 


X 

R/W/F 
X 


X 
X 

R/W/F 



LEGEND: R 

W 

F 
X 
NR 



Read 

Write 

Format 

Not Allowed 

Not Recommended 



FIGURE 7 



1.12/ Basics 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 






Note: To help understand drive and media format 
compatibility, think in terms of the drive/media of 
lowest capacity. For example, if your system has both 
an external 800K drive and an Apple FDHD drive, to 
ensure media format compatibility between the two 
drives you must use 800K media (the drive and media of 
lowest capacity). 



Macintosh I lei Sep 89 Basics/ 1.13 



□ SPECIFICATIONS 



Processor 



i 



MC68030 CPU, 32-bit architecture with bursting 
support 



Clock Frequency 



25.0 MHz 



Addressing 



32-bit internal registers 

32-bit address bus 

Supports paged memory management 



Coprocessor 



25 MHz MC68882 Floating-Point Unit (FPU) 

Accepts optional coprocessor cards installed in NuBus 

expansion slots. 



ROM 



512K 



RAM 



1 MB expandable to 8 MB (expandable to 128 MB when 
SIMMs with higher-density DRAM chips become 
available); additional expandability through NuBus slots 



Slot Expansion 



Three NuBus expansion slots 
Power available per slot 
+ 5 V 12 Amps 10 Watts 

+12 V 0.175 Amps 2.1 Watts 
-12 V 0.150 Amps 1.8 Watts 

One RAM cache slot 
Power available 
+5 V 1 Amp 5 Watts 



Sound 



Apple Sound Chip (ASC), including four- voice wave- 
table synthesis and stereo sampling generator capable 
of driving stereo mini phone jack headphones or stereo 
equipment 



Disk Drives 



Internal Apple FDHD drive 
External 3.5-inch 800K disk drive 



Hard Disk 



SCSI hard disks (internal/optional external) 



1.14/ Basics 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 



SCSI 



One external SCSI port (DB-25) 



Serial Ports 



Two RS-422 (RS-232 compatible) serial ports, 230.4K 
baud maximum (Mini DIN-8) 



Video Display 



Built-in video support with external video port to 
support the Apple High-Resolution Monochrome 
Monitor, AppleColor High-Resolution RGB Monitor, and 
the Apple Portrait Display 

Will also support multiple external color and 
monochrome monitors connected through video cards in 
NuBus expansion slots 



Keyboard 



Apple Keyboard or Apple Extended Keyboard connected 
through Apple Desktop Bus ports (Mini DIN-4) 



Mouse 



Apple Desktop Bus mouse (Mini DIN-4) 



Input Power 



100 to 240 volts AC RMS automatically configured 
50-60 Hz single phase 

130 Watts maximum, not including monitor convenience 
power connector load 



System 
Output Power 



Output receptacle: 100-240 Volts AC, RMS 
(determined by actual input voltage) 



DC power: 90 watts maximum 

+5 Volt 12.0 Amps (60 Watts) 
+12 Volt 1.5 Amps (18 Watts) 
-12 Volt 1.0 Amps (12 Watts) 



Clock/Calendar 



CMOS custom chip with long-life lithium battery 
256 bytes of parameter memory 



Operating Temperature 



10° C to 40° C 
50° F to 104° F 



Storage Temperature 



-40° C to 47° C 
-40° F to 116.6° F 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Basics/ 1.15 



Relative Humidity 5% to 95% (noncondensing) 

Altitude to 3048 m (0 to 10,000 ft.) 



1.16/ Basics Sep 89 Macintosh I lei 



□ THEORY OF OPERATION 



Introduction 



The Macintosh Ilci computer is made up of three basic 
modules: the logic board, the power supply, and the 
disk drives. The computer can have one internal floppy 
disk drive and can have one internal SCSI hard disk. 



The information here will give you an understanding of 
how the Macintosh Ilci computer works. This 
understanding, in turn, will assist you in performing 
logical troubleshooting on this system. 



System 
Startup 



When the computer is turned on, the system begins a 
carefully synchronized sequence of events. First, ROM 
is mapped by the MDU to physical $0000 0000. This 
enables the starting address, retrieved by the 68030 on 
reset, to be stored in ROM. After the first access to 
the true ROM address space, the normal memory map is 
imposed by the MDU. The only change from one map to 
the other is that the power-up map selects ROM for 
low addresses, whereas the normal map selects RAM for 
that address space. 

The software determines the memory size and compiles 
a table describing the current memory configuration. 
The MMU is then programmed, based on this table, to 
provide contiguous logical memory from the potentially 
noncontiguous physical segments in Bank A and B. 
The 24/32-bit memory map is designed to allow 
existing Macintosh software to use a 24-bit address 
mode while new software can use the full 32-bit 
address space. The mapping is implemented simply and 
directly. 



At this point the disk startup process begins. The 
system looks for a readable disk in the available disk 
drives in the following order: 

1) Internal floppy disk drive 

2) External floppy disk drive 

3) Setup device set in the control panel 

4) SCSI devices in declining order of device ID 
(6 to 0) 

Note: If the battery is removed or the contents of the 
parameter RAM is destroyed, the setup device defaults 
to the device with ID=0. 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Basics/ 1.17 



Once a readable disk is found, it is read and the disk 
startup process is completed. 



. 



Physical 
Address Map 



Device Selects 



Bank A 
(4 SIMMs) 
1 MB min. 

Req'dfor 
RBV Video 



Sync Signa ls 



Video 
Port 



External 
Audio Port 

— ® 




FIGURE 8 






1.18 /Basics 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 



Logic Board 



The logic board is the heart of the system, the place 
where all processing of information takes place. What 
follows is a list of the major components of the 
Macintosh Ilci logic board and the functions they 
perform. 

By using the block diagram in Figure 8 as you read 
through the various sections, you will get a clearer 
understanding of how the logic board works. 



Microprocessors 



The Macintosh Ilci contains a 68030 microprocessor, 
which is a true 32-bit processor but also supports both 
24- and 16-bit processing modes. It runs at 25 MHz for 
high performance. When running in the 24-bit 
addressing mode, the Macintosh Ilci is compatible with 
the majority of existing Macintosh applications. 

When working in A/UX (Apple UNIX), the 68030 
microprocessor incorporates instruction sets for 
handling paged memory management, thereby 
eliminating the need for an HMMU or PMMU (as found 
in the Macintosh II). When data is sought from a memory 
location that isn't in the RAM, the 68030 swaps the page 
containing the data from the disk to the RAM. 



Numeric Coprocessor 



The MC68882 numeric coprocessor in the Macintosh Ilci 
is a surface mount Quad-Flat-Pack that uses the 
coprocessor interface of the 68030 to perform numeric 
computations in parallel with 68030 program execution. 
It provides a high degree of precision and speed for 
Macintosh programs. 



RAM 



The Random-Access Memory (RAM) is provided in 
packages known as Single In-Line Memory Modules 
(SIMMs). Each SIMM consists of a small printed circuit 
board with various configurations of dynamic RAM 
(DRAM) chips. On one edge of each SIMM is a contact 
that fits into the SIMM sockets located on the logic 
board. The RAM interface requires 80-ns-RAS-access- 
time DRAMs with CAS before RAS refresh. The amount 
of RAM on the logic board can be changed by installing 
same-size SIMMs in Bank A or Bank B. The two banks 
of RAM do not occupy contiguous address space, as they 
do on the previous Macintosh products. The 68030 on- 
chip MMU (memory management unit) is used to join 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Basics/ 1.19 



the discontiguous blocks of physical memory to current 
contiguous logical memory for application software. 

Note: If the built-in video feature is used, then you 
must have RAM in bank A. If a video card is used, and 
built-in video in not used, then bank A does not have to 
have RAM in it. 

Various RAM configurations are possible, depending on 
the size of the DRAM chips and on how many SIMMs 
(installed in sets of four) are used. 

Every time the Macintosh Ilci is switched on, the 
system software performs a memory test to determine 
how much RAM is present in the machine. 

When built-in video is being used, RAM must be 
installed in bank A because the frame buffer is 
maintained beginning at physical address $0000 0000. 
The RBV frame buffer is variable in size, depending on 
the currently selected bit depth and the size of the 
video monitor plugged into the video port. The RBV 
requires only enough memory to hold the contents of 
the screen. The operating system decides at startup 
how much of bank A to devote to video and how much 
may be mapped to the system/application RAM address 
space. 

Video accesses affect only bank A memory access 
because the data bus between the RAM banks can be 
disconnected by a bus buffer. This allows the RBV to 
fetch data from bank A without interrupting CPU access 
to bank B or I/O devices. Each bank of RAM is 
accessed independently by the MDU, so it can decode 
addresses for the CPU and the RBV at the same time 
without interference. 

If there is RAM in both bank A and bank B, the 
Macintosh Ilci will operate more efficiently with the 
larger RAM SIMMs in bank B. 



ROM The ROMs are the system's nonvolatile Read-Only 

Memory. The Macintosh Ilci presently contains four 
128K x 8-bit ROM chips in 32-pin DIP packages 
(soldered), which form a 32-bit-wide data bus. This 
provides a total of 512K of ROM that contain the 
routines for built-in video, parity, VM (virtual memory; 
used with A/UK), 32-bit Quickdraw, Toolbox, the 



1 .20 / Basics Sep 89 Macintosh Ilci 



i 



operating system, and other necessary system routines. 
The ROMs are also "32-bit clean" (have the ability to 
address 1.2 GB of addressable memory, which will 
allow support for future operating systems). 

Also included on the logic board is a 64-pin ROM SIMM 
socket that will allow the Macintosh Ilci to use new 
ROM SIMMs when available, thus providing a simple 
method to upgrade the machine. 



Built-in Video 
RBVChip 



The RBV (RAM-Based Video) consists of two functional 
parts, the video interface and the VIA2. The video 
portion of the RBV and bank A of RAM share a 
separated RAM data bus, which can be connected to or 
disconnected from the CPU data bus by bus buffers. 
Data stored in bank A of RAM is used by the RBV to 
feed a constant stream of video data to the display 
monitor during the live video portion of each 
horizontal screen line. The RBV asks the MDU 
(Memory Decode Unit) for data as it is needed. The 
MDU responds by disconnecting the bank A RAM data 
bus from the CPU data bus and performing an eight- 
long-word DMA burst read from bank A RAM while 
clocking the read data into the RBV. 

If a video burst is in progress, CPU access to RAM bank 
A is delayed, effectively slowing the CPU. This effect 
is more pronounced for the larger monitors and for 
video configurations using more bits-per-pixel. Only 
accesses to RAM bank A are affected by video. The 
optional bank B of DRAM connects directly to the CPU 
data bus, and the CPU has full access to this bank at all 
times, as it does to ROM and the I/O devices. 

The video signals that are generated by the RBV chip 
are driven through a CLUT/VDAC (Color Lookup 
Table/Video Digital-to-Analog Converter) chip. The 
lookup table has 256 three-byte entries (one byte each 
for red, green, and blue), and triple 8-bit video D/A 
converters. 

When a monitor is connected to the built-in video ports, 
the monitor will ground certain pins on the connector 
which allows the RBV to identify the type of monitor 
connected. The RBV automatically selects the 
appropriate pixel clock and sync timing parameters. If 
an unknown monitor is plugged in or no monitor is 
plugged in, built-in video output is halted. 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Basics/ 1.21 



The built-in video will support monitors with screen 
sizes of 640 x 480, with up to 8 bits/pixel (12" B/W, 
13" RGB) and 640 x 870, with up to 4 bits/pixel 
(15" full-page Portrait display). 

The VIA2 portion contains eight 8-bit registers for 
miscellaneous inputs and outputs, video control, RBV 
chip-testing modes, and interrupt handling. The CPU 
communicates with these registers over an 8-bit 
bidirectional data bus that is separate from the 32-bit 
RAM data bus used by the video portion. 



i 



Input / Output 
Interface 



The input/output interfaces of the system are the 
serial ports, controlled by the Serial Communications 
Controller (SCC) circuitry; the floppy disk, controlled by 
the SWIM circuitry; the SCSI devices, controlled by the 
Small Computer Standard Interface circuitry; the stereo 
sound port, controlled by Apple Sound Chip circuitry, 
and the ADB controlled by the ADB circuitry. The 
numeric coprocessor, the VIA chip, the VIA2 (which is 
part of the RBV chip), and associated circuitry are, to 
some extent, considered input/output devices; however, 
it should be recognized that they provide input/output 
to the processor. They do not have external ports as the 
system-level input/output circuitry does. Each of these 
interfaces is designed to be backwards compatible, when 
possible, with existing Macintosh systems. 



Versatile 
Interface 
Adapters 



The VIA1 and VIA2 provide maximum compatibility with 
existing Macintosh software. VIA1 has several CPU ID 
bits redefined to allow the ROM to distinguish between 
different computers. ROM overlay is performed 
automatically by the MDU so the overlay bit was 
eliminated. Two bits were redefined for parity, in 
addition to one bit in the VIA2 data register. The 
function of VIA2's is now provided by the RBV. Memory 
mapping is now supplied by the 68030 on-board MMU, 
so the RAM-size bits are no longer needed. 

VIA1, which is a 6523 chip, provides the system with 
most of the signals from the 68000-based Macintosh 
configuration. VIA1 also provides access to features, 
including an Apple Desktop Bus interrupt and a 
synchronous modem signal. The VIA1 is configured to 
appear to the software as the VIA chip in 68000-based 
Macintoshes. 






1.22 /Basics 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 



The VIA2 functions accommodate control of the new 
features that the Macintosh II design contains. VI A2 
function is provided by the RBV and provides decoding 
of the NuBus slot interrupts, two SCSI interrupts, the 
Apple Sound Chip interrupt, detection of the external 
speaker or amplifier, testing of the parity circuit, 
flushing and disabling of a cache card, powering the 
unit off, blocking NuBus accesses to RAM, and decoding 
what error occurred in a NuBus transaction. 



SWIM Chip 



The SWIM chip in the Macintosh Ilci replaces the IWM 
chip in the Macintosh II. The SWIM incorporates the 
functionality of the IWM and provides the capability to 
read, write, and format in both GCR (Apple) and MFM 
(MS-DOS and Apple high-density) data formats. The 
SWIM chip controls the one floppy disk drive internal 
to the unit and the one external floppy drive. In the 
Macintosh Ilci the SWIM uses a 15. 667 -MHz clock when 
accessing the Apple FDHD drive and uses a divide-by- 
two circuit when accessing an 800K drive. 



Small Computer 

Standard 

Interface 



The Small Computer Standard Interface (SCSI) consists 
of an 53C80 chip (CMOS version), an internal 50-pin 
connector, and an external DB-25 connector. The chip 
is connected directly to both connectors, and it controls 
the high-speed parallel port for communicating with up 
to seven SCSI peripherals. This device supports 
arbitration of the SCSI bus, including reselection. The 
chip is controlled through a set of memory-mapped 
read-and-write registers. 

The Macintosh Ilci external SCSI port differs from the 
industry SCSI standard in two ways: 

1. A DB-25 connector is used instead of the standard 
50-pin connector. An adapter is available to convert 
the connector to the standard. 

2. Power for termination resistors is provided. If the 
attached SCSI device does not have the required 
terminator resistor, an Apple-manufactured 
terminator block must be installed on the last 
device. 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Basics/ 1.23 



Serial 

Communications 

Controller 



The two serial ports are controlled by the Serial 
Communications Controller (SCO, an 8-MHz Z8530 
that has two independent ports for serial 
communication. Each port can be independently 
programmed for asynchronous, synchronous, and 
AppleTalk protocols. The serial ports conform to EIA 
standard RS422. These ports are used mainly for 
(though not limited to) connecting the Macintosh Ilci to 
networks, printers, and modems. 



The Macintosh Ilci uses two Mini-DIN 8-pin connectors 
(Figure 9) for the two ports. Both connectors are 
interfaced through two 26LS30 and two 75175 chips to 
the SCC. Each signal pin passes through an RC filter 
network. The ports provide an output handshake but do 
not provide the +5 and +12 volts found on the 
Macintosh 128K, 512K, and 512K enhanced serial ports. 




FIGURE 9 



Apple 
Sound Chip 



The Apple Sound Chip generates a stereo/audio signal. 
This signal is buffered by two additional chips that 
filter the Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) signal and 
drive the internal speaker or external stereo 
miniphone jack. If an external stereo mini-phone jack 
is not plugged into the Ilci connector, then the internal 
speaker is driven from channel A sound output. 






1.24 /Basics 



Sep 89 



Macintosh Ilci 



The sound generation system in the Macintosh Ilci 
supports the previous Macintosh modes; it also offers a 
complete set of new ROM tools in the Software Sound 
Manager for performing sound generation. 



Apple 
Desktop Bus 



The Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) is a serial communication 
bus used to connect keyboards, mouse devices, graphic 
tablets, and other input devices to the system. It is a 
single-master, multiple-slave serial bus using an 
asynchronous protocol. The processor normally samples 
the state of each of the devices by using the control 
lines and shift register in VTA1 to read or write bytes 
over an internal serial link to the Apple DeskTop Bus 
modem chip. This is a 4-bit microprocessor that actually 
drives the external bus and reads the status of the 
selected device. The Mini-DIN 4-pin ADB connectors 
(Figure 10) connect the devices to the Macintosh Ilci. 




Power 



DATA 



Male Cable 
(Plug) 



Female PCB mount 
(back of machine) 



FIGURE 10 

All devices that are made for the Apple Desktop Bus 
have some kind of microprocessor that makes them 
intelligent devices. All ADB devices, except the mouse, 
have ports for connecting to other ADB devices. 
Because it has no port, the mouse must be the last 
device attached to the Apple Desktop Bus. 

There are two Macintosh Apple ADB keyboards — the 
Apple Keyboard and the Apple Extended Keyboard. 
Both keyboards connect to the Apple Desktop Bus port 
on the rear of the Macintosh Ilci. Both keyboards have 
their own microprocessors, which are called keyboard 
microcontrollers. The keyboards operate 
asynchronously, issuing commands on the ADB and 
transmitting and receiving data to and from the ADB 
devices. 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Basics/ 1.25 



Real-Time 
Clock 



The Macintosh Ilci real-time clock is a custom chip. It 
contains 256 bytes of RAM that are powered by a 
battery when external power is turned off. These RAM 
bytes are called parameter RAM. They store the 
configuration of ports, the clock setting, and other data 
that must be preserved even when the system power is 
not available. 



i 



NuBus 
Interface 



The Macintosh Ilci has three expansion slots to support 
Apple standard peripherals and increase RAM size. 
Each expansion slot is a 96-pin DIN connector that uses 
the NuBus interface to communicate with the system. 
The following are a few of the cards that will go into 
the NuBus slots: 



• Video cards 

• Extra RAM 

• Ethernet™ (and other networks) 

• Add-on SCSI port card 

The NuBus interface supports the following features for 
the Macintosh Ilci: 

• Geographic Addressing Each of the three slots has a 
unique 4-bit value encoded into the slots, which 
eliminates the need for DIP switches or other means 
to uniquely address each card. 

• Distributed Arbitration There is no central bus 
master or daisy chain to assign bus mastership. The 
bus mastership is performed with the geographic 
addresses, thus allowing a priority within a group 
of bus requesters but not an overriding control of 
the bus. In theory, all requesters will receive equal 
access to the bus over time. 

• Synchronous Transaction All bus transactions are 
timed relative to a single asymmetric 10-MHz clock. 

• 32-bit Address/Data The NuBus supports 4 GB of 
address with justified 8-bit, 1 6-bit, and 32-bit data 
transactions. The 68030 supports all these data 
types through the use of dynamic bus sizing. This 
means word and long-word operations do not have 
to be aligned but instead cause multiple NuBus 
transactions to perform the proper alignment. The 
data bus from the 68030 to NuBus is byte reversed 
to allow sequential byte addresses to appear on the 
NuBus data ports in the same order as the NuBus 
address would imply. 






1 .26 / Basics 



Sep 89 



Macintosh Ilci 






• Bus Time-out The absence of a card on the NuBus 
will not hang the bus by waiting for a reply. A 
system resource will error out any transaction 
taking longer than 25.6 |is. 

• Simple Interrupts Each card has the ability to 
generate simple open-collector interrupts that allow 
inexpensive cards to gain system attention without 
having to become bus master. 

The NuBus has three major states of communication 
with the Macintosh Ilci system: 

• Processor to NuBus, which is activated whenever 
the microprocessor generates a physical slot 
address. If a device responds, the data is 
transferred. 

• NuBus to Processor Bus, which is for access to 
RAM, ROM, and I/O to and from NuBus. Two 
control functions are performed for this process. 
One tracks the changes on NuBus, and the other lets 
the 68020/68030 tell NuBus what to do next. 

• NuBus time-out, which is required to prevent access 
to empty slots. Such access would hang the system. 



The NuBus implemented in the Ilci also allows 
communications directly from one NuBus card to a 
second NuBus card. 

Every NuBus card should contain a ROM declaration 
that provides information to the operating system at 
startup. The ROM information ensures that drivers are 
properly installed and that the card is initialized and 
recognized by the system. 



Cache Connector 



The cache connector is a 120-pin EuroDIN connector 
that will enable installation of a cache card to boost the 
performance. The main idea of adding a cache card is to 
increase the effective speed of main memory by 
providing the CPU with a copy of the most frequently 
used data more quickly. The cache stores the most 
recently accessed data and instruction in a small (<64K) 
bank of high-speed memory. This storage is especially 
useful in accessing looping routines. A cache card 
should operate transparently to the user programs. 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Basics / 1 .27 



The cache should be physically mapped, because it has 
no access to the 68030 chip's on-board MMU, so cache 
coherency should not be a problem. 

CAUTION: Even though the cache connector is the same 
connector used in the SE/30, the SE/30 cards are not 
compatible with the cache connector. The pinouts are 
different. Using a SE/30 card in the cache connector will 
damage both the computer and the card. 



Parity Parity is generated by the PGC (Parity Generator Chip). 

If the parity chip is installed, and parity checking is 
required, then the system must use 9-bit DRAM SIMMs. 
If parity checking is not needed, then 8-bit DRAMs can 
be used and parity checking will not take place. A 
warning message will be issued at boot time to indicate 
non-functioning parity. 

If the PGC is present, the parity bit is always written. 
If the bit is not physically present (not using 9-bit 
DRAMs), it is simply ignored. If the correct DRAMs are 
being used when a read takes place in the RAM address 
space, the PGC generates an internal parity bit from 
each byte of the data bus, and compares it to the bit 
read from the SIMM's parity bit. If the two parity bits 
do not agree, and parity is enabled, the PGC generates 
two outputs: one that interrupts the processor and the 
other that indicates a parity error. At that point the 
system will have to be reset. 

Power The Macintosh Ilci has a Hard-ON/Soft-OFF 

Control circuit to control the power supply. The circuit is 

designed to control the power supply through the 
Power Fail Warning signal on NuBus. 

The circuit design attempts to turn on the power supply 
while the power switch is pressed (Hard-ON) and for 
2-4 seconds after the power switch is pressed, 
depending on how many external SCSI devices are 
connected. The Apple Desktop Bus keyboard has a 
secondary power switch that can turn on the unit. 
When the power switch is pressed, a capacitor is 
discharged through a resistor to activate the power-on 
circuitry. The capacitor gets its charge through a soft- 
power circuit that is active even when the computer is 
turned off. As long as AC current is present (the unit is 
plugged in), the power supply will turn on the 
computer within 2-4 seconds. 

1 .28 / Basics Sep 89 Macintosh lici 



This circuit works in conjunction with the new Locking 
Power Switch located on the rear of the unit. This 
switch can be locked in an ON position, which allows 
the unit to restart itself as soon as AC power is 
detected. In effect, if there is a power failure and the 
unit shuts off, the unit will start up as soon as the 
power is reinstated. If this switch is not in the ON 
position, the unit will not turn on until someone turns 
it on. This feature is most valuable when using the unit 
as a file server. 

The power-off function is under software control (Soft- 
OFF) by using the menu command Shut Down from the 
Special menu of the Finder. This software control 
allows the computer to clean up any pending activity 
before switching off. The power-down switch 
generates a Hard-OFF that turns off the computer after 
2 ms without going through software. 



Power 
Supply 



The power supply operates on standard line voltage and 
outputs +5V, +12V, and -12V DC voltages, which are 
used by the logic board, the internal devices, and the 
slots. 



CAUTION: It is extremely important that the ratings of the 
power supply not be exceeded. Exceeding the ratings will 
result in damage to the power supply and the logic hoard. 
See the specifications in this section for maximum ratings 
for the system. 



Fuses 



There are three fuses on the logic board to protect the 
external connectors, SCSI, floppy disk drive, and ADB. 
These fuses are resettable polyfuses and require about 
four seconds to reset once blown by an overload. 



Internal Floppy 
Disk Drives 



The internal disk drive connects to the main logic board 
through an internally installed connector. The flow of 
data between the logic board and the disk drives is 
channeled through the SWIM disk controller. The 
SWIM controls reading and writing operations. 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Basics/ 1.29 



FDHD The SWIM disk controller enables the Apple FDHD 

Drive drive to exchange data between Apple and MS-DOS 

systems. The SWIM chip interprets, converts, and 
outputs dual-disk (clock/time) and file (data) signals as 
appropriate for either GCR (Apple) or MFM (MS-DOS 
and Apple high-density) formats. This arrangement 
provides the capability to read, write, and format Apple 
400K and 800K data disks (GCR), MS-DOS 720K data 
disks (MFM), and Apple or MS-DOS high-density 
(1.4 MB) data disks (MFM). 

An application-specific translator within the Apple File 
Exchange utility program, or provided by third parties, 
must be used to translate the formatted data for use 
within an application program. 

Internal Hard The hard disk connects to the logic board through the 

Disk SCSI internal SCSI connector. Other SCSI devices may be 

daisy-chained to the external SCSI port. 



1 .30 / Basics Sep 89 Macintosh I lei 






# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llci 

Section 2 - Take-Apart 



□ CONTENTS 








2.2 


Electrostatic Discharge Prevention 




2.3 


Top Lid 




2.4 


Interface Cards 




2.5 


Speaker Bracket and Speaker 




2.8 


Power Supply 




2.10 


Fan Bracket and Fan 




2.12 


Hard Disk Drive 




2.16 


Disk Drive Carrier and Floppy Disk Drive 




2.21 


Reset/Interrupt Switch 




2.22 


Main Logic Board 



Note: If a step is underlined, detailed instructions for 
that step can be found elsewhere in the section. 



Macintosh llci Sep 89 Take-Apart / 2.1 



□ ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE PREVENTION 



I 



The Macintosh Ilci contains C-MOS components, and 
RAM memory is installed on small separate boards 
called SIMMs (Single In-line Memory Modules). Both 
the C-MOS components and the SIMM modules are very 
susceptible to damage from electrostatic discharge 
(ESD). 

Preventive measures must be taken to avoid ESD 
damage. When you are unwrapping, installing, or 
replacing any modules, observe the appropriate ESD 
precautions. 

For complete ESD prevention information, refer to You 
Oughta Know Technical Procedures. 

If the proper ESD procedures are not available, then do 
the following: 

Turn off the Macintosh Ilci power switch and disconnect 
the power cord. After removing the lid and before 
going near the logic board, touch the metal of the 
power supply case. 



2.2 / Take-Apart Sep 89 Macintosh Ilci 



□ TOP LID 



Materials Required 



Phillips screwdriver 



Remove 



1. Remove the AC power cable. 

2. Remove the Phillips screw (Figure 1, #1) at the top 
rear of the case. 




FIGURE 1 

3. Push up on the tabs on the back of the lid 

(Figure 1, #2) and lift up the lid from the back to 
the front until the lid comes off the front end. 



Replace 



1. Insert the front end of the lid onto the front end of 
the unit, making sure that the tabs on the lid fit into 
the receptacle on the unit. 

2. Swing the lid down toward the back of the unit, 
pressing down on the back until you hear a small 
click. 

3. Replace the Phillips screw on the rear of the unit 
(Figure 1, #1). 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Take-Apart / 2.3 



□ INTERFACE CARDS 



The following procedure can be used to remove or 
replace any interface or expansion card that is installed 
in the Macintosh Ilci. 



Remove 



1. Remove the top cover . 

2. Touch the metal on the power supply case inside the 
computer to discharge any static electricity that 
might be on your body or clothing. 

WARNING: If the computer has been on, let it cool for 5 
minutes before touching the power supply. 



3. Carefully grasp each end of the card and pull 

straight up to remove it. To put the least possible 
stress on the logic board, gently tilt the card 
forward and back while pulling upward. 

Note: When removing the card, pull up evenly on 
both sides of the card to avoid bending the 
connector pins. 



Replace 



1. Position the card so that the connector on the 

bottom of the card lines up with the slot. Align the 
card so that the metal guides — at the top and bottom 
of the rear slot opening — fit through the metal 
shield attached to the card. 



2. Place one hand on the card, directly over the 
connector area, and push down firmly until the 
connector is fully seated. 

CAUTION: Do not force the card If you meet a lot of 
resistance, remove the card and try again. 

3. Replace the top cover . 



' 



2.4 / Take- Apart 



Sep 89 



Macintosh Ilci 






□ SPEAKER BRACKET AND SPEAKER 



Remove 



The speaker is secured in a speaker bracket that must 
be removed from the case before the speaker can be 
removed. 



1. Remove the top lid . 

2. Find the speaker (Figure 2, #1) in the speaker 
bracket (Figure 2, #2) located at the front of the 
unit and pull out the two-wire connector going to 
the main logic board. 




FIGURE 2 

3. Gently lift up on the tab (Figure 2, #3) in the 

center of the bracket and at the same time pull back 
on the top of the speaker bracket until it comes 
loose from the bottom area. 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Take-Apart / 2.5 



CAUTION: In the next step, do not push on the heavy 
paper part of the speaker, or you will damage the speaker. 

4. Gently push the speaker out of the bracket by 
applying force at the center of the rear of the 
speaker (Figure 3, #1). 



i 




FIGURE 3 



Replace 



Line up the rear part (Figure 4, #1) of the speaker 
(the round metal part that sticks out on the back of 
the speaker) with the round hole in the speaker 
bracket. 



2. Make sure that the two wires (Figure 4, #2) from 
the speaker are protruding through one of the two 
openings on either side of the round hole on the 
bracket. 






2.6 / Take-Apart 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 







FIGURE 4 

3. Gently push the round metal part of the speaker 
into the round hole on the bracket until it stops 
going in and the rectangular front part of the 
speaker is embedded in the rectangular frame of the 
bracket (Figure 4, #3). 

4. With the speaker facing the front of the case, insert 
the bottom of the bracket at an angle so that the 
bottom back side of the bracket is at the edge of the 
logic board. 

5. Push the top of the bracket down and forward 
toward the front of the case. This action should 
wedge the bottom of the bracket between the edge 
of the logic board and the front of the case. 

6. Press the top of the bracket forward to make sure it 
is secured to the front of the case. 

7. Connect the two-wire speaker cable to the 2-pin 
connector (J23) on the logic board. 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Take-Apart / 2.7 



□ POWER SUPPLY 



I 



Remove 



1. Remove the AC power cable. 



2. Remove the top lid . 

3. Reach down and underneath the front right of the 
power supply (Figure 5, #1) where the disk drive 
carrier is touching the power supply, and find the 
tab (Figure 5, #2) that is latched to the bottom of 
the power supply. (This tab is part of the disk 
drive carrier unit.) 




FIGURE 5 

4. Using a finger, push the end of the tab toward the 
front of the case and at the same time lift up on the 
power supply. You will have to use some force to 
loosen the power supply, since you are pulling out a 
connector while you're lifting. If the power supply 
seems as if it won't move, make sure you are 
unlatching it correctly at the tab underneath. 

Once the power supply begins to move, it will come 
completely up and out of the case. 



2.8 / Take-Apart 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 



Replace 



Line up the power supply correctly over the space 
on the logic board. Make sure that the two lips on 
the power supply case (Figure 6, #1) line up with 
the slot on the left side of the case and the slot on 
the back wall of the case (Figure 6, #2). 




FIGURE 6 

Note: Don't worry about the connector on the 
bottom of the power supply. This is a self-aligning 
connector that will go into the connector on the 
logic board, as long as you have properly aligned 
the power supply. 

Slide the power supply down into the case until you 
hear a click. If you don't hear the click, you either 
did not align the case properly or the connector is 
not pushed in far enough. Lift out the supply and 
start over again. You must hear the click. 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Take-Apart / 2.9 



□ FAN BRACKET AND FAN 



The fan and fan bracket are two separate units. To 
remove the fan, you must first remove the fan bracket. 



Remove 



1. Remove the power supply . 

2. Unlatch the two bracket latches (Figure 7, #1) that 
protrude from the bottom of the power supply by 
gently squeezing them together until they clear the 
metal tabs. As the tabs are released, push up on 
them so that the fan bracket starts to come out of 
the power supply case. 




FIGURE 7 

3. Pull out the bracket completely. 

4. When the bracket is completely out, unplug the 
connector that attaches to the printed circuit board 
inside the power supply case. 

5. On the fan side of the bracket (the side from which 
the wires exit), unlatch the two plastic tabs (one on 
each side of the fan) (Figure 8, #1), and push the fan 
out of the bracket. 



2.10 /Take-Apart 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 




FIGURE 8 



Replace 






1. Align the fan in the bracket so that the hub of the 
fan (with the wiring) goes into the bracket. This 
way the wires will be sticking out of the fan away 
from the bracket (Figure 8, #2). It is also important 
that the wire side be toward the bottom of the 
bracket. The large flat side (Figure 8, #3) of the 
bracket is the top. 



2. Start the fan bracket into the power supply. The 
wires should be facing toward the inside of the 
supply. Plug the 2-wire connector into the 
connector on the power supply logic board. 

Note: Make sure the fan wire is pushed back into 
the power supply to prevent the wire from hitting 
the blades. 

3. Push the bracket all the way down until the two 
latches protrude through the bottom of the power 
supply and engage the two metal tabs. 

4. Hand-spin the fan and listen to determine if the 
blades are hitting the wire. If they are, remove the 
fan bracket again and readjust the wire so it won't 
hit the fan blades. 

5. Replace the power supply . 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.11 



□ HARD DISK DRIVE 



I 



The hard disk drive (Figure 9, #1) is located in the top 
portion of the disk drive carrier unit (Figure 9, #2). 
The hard disk drive can be removed with or without 
removing the carrier unit. The following procedure 
describes how to remove the hard disk drive without 
removing the carrier unit. (The procedure for removing 
the carrier unit is explained later in these Take-Apart 
procedures.) 




FIGURE 9 



Remove 



1. Remove the top lid . 



2. Carefully pull out the 50-pin connector from the 
back of the hard disk drive (Figure 9, #3). 

3. Disconnect the HDA power cable. 






2.12 /Take-Apart 



rev. Apr 90 



Macintosh I lei 



4. 



Note: If the HDA is to be returned to Apple, retain 
the HDA power cable that is currently in the unit 
and exchange it with the cable in the replacement 
HDA. The replacement HDA cable should be 
returned to Apple along with the failed HDA. 

Remove the diode drive light on the front of the 
case by lifting up on the plastic holder (Figure 10, 
#1) and pulling the diode (Figure 10, #2) out from 
the holder. 







FIGURE 10 

5. Grasp the two metals tabs (Figure 10, #3) located on 
the side of the hard disk drive bracket. Squeeze 
the tabs and gently pull up on the bracket. 



Macintosh I lei 



rev. Apr 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.13 



Note: On some hard disk drives, the power 
connector may not be on the top (as shown in the 
diagram). The connector may be on the back of the 
hard disk drive next to the 50-pin connector. 

The hard disk drive (with its metal bracket) will 
start to come out from the large plastic carrier unit 
(Figure 10, #4). However, the hard disk drive will 
not pull out all the way; you must first disconnect 
the power supply connector (Figure 10, #5). Then 
remove the hard disk drive. 

Note: If you are replacing the hard disk drive, you 
must remove the metal bracket. Replacement drives 
come in a metal bracket that fits in the Macintosh 
SE, SE/30, II, IIx, and Ilfx. 

6. Remove the customer's defective hard disk drive 
from its metal bracket by removing the four Phillips 
screws on the bottom of the bracket (Figure 11, #1). 

7. Remove the metal bracket from the replacement hard 
disk drive by removing the four Phillips screws on 
the bottom of the bracket. 

8. Position the customer's metal bracket on the 
replacement hard disk drive and secure the bracket 
with the four Phillips screws. 

9. Use the four Phillips screws to attach the metal 
bracket (supplied with the replacement HDA) to the 
customer's defective HDA. 

Note: The metal bracket supplied with the 
replacement HDA must be used to return the 
defective HDA. 



2.14 / Take-Apart rev. Apr 90 Macintosh llci 




FIGURE 11 






Replace 



1. Mount the hard disk drive onto the metal bracket 
and secure it with the four Phillips screws. 

2. Position the bracket and drive over the plastic disk 
drive carrier unit, and push in the power supply 
connector. Be careful not to push too hard or the 
printed circuit board may break. It is best to put 
your thumb on the back of the board to support it, 
and then squeeze the connector all the way on. 

3. Push the bracket and drive down into the carrier 
unit until the hard disk drive snaps into place. 

4. Connect the 50-pin connector on the back of the 
hard disk drive. 

5. Put the drive diode light back into the clear plastic 
lens. 

6. Reinsert the clear plastic lens into the front case 
housing. 

7. Replace the top lid . 



Macintosh llci 



rev. Apr 90 



Take-Apart/ 2.15 



D DISK DRIVE CARRIER AND FLOPPY DISK DRIVE 



I 



To remove the floppy disk drive, it is necessary to 
remove the whole plastic disk drive carrier unit 
(Figure 12, #1) that holds both the hard disk drive and 
the floppy disk drive. 




FIGURE 12 



Remove 



1. Remove the top lid . 

2. Remove the power supply . 

3. Remove the Phillips screw (Figure 12, #2) from the 
disk carrier. 

4. Remove the diode from the lens (Figure 13, #1). 

5. Pull up on the paper connector tab (Figure 13, #2) 
on the 50-pin connector (that secures the signal 
cable to the main logic board) and disconnect the 
cable connector. 



2.16 /Take-Apart 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 




FIGURE 13 

6, Disconnect the 20-pin connector (Figure 13, #3) 
from the logic board. 

7. Disconnect the power cable connector from the hard 
disk drive (Figure 13, #4). 

...Continued on next page 



Macintosh llci 



Sep 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.17 



8. Unlatch the bracket (Figure 14, #1) along the side 
of the carrier unit, and at the same time pull the 
whole carrier toward the rear of the case about a 
half-inch. When this distance is reached, lift up on 
the carrier to remove it from the case. 



i 




FIGURE 14 

Note: If the hard disk drive is also to be removed, 
you can follow the removal steps in the "Hard Disk 
Drive" section above. It doesn't matter whether the 
disk drive carrier is in or out of the main case. 

9. Turn over the carrier unit and gently push down on 
the latch (Figure 15, #1) that holds the front of the 
floppy disk drive. 

10. Move the floppy disk drive toward the front of the 
carrier about one inch, and pull the front of the 
floppy drive away from the carrier. The rest of the 
drive will follow. Remove the drive. 



2.18 /Take-Apart 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 




FIGURE 15 



Replace 



1. Turn the carrier unit upside down so that the bottom 
is facing up. 

2. Insert the floppy drive into the carrier, back end 
first, printed circuit side up, about an inch from the 
back of the carrier. 

3. Turn the carrier unit over, so that the floppy drive 
is now on the bottom. 



4. Swing the floppy drive into the carrier so that it is 
parallel to the carrier. Then push the drive down 
toward the back of the carrier until you hear and 
see the latch (Figure 15, #1) click over the front 
top of the floppy disk drive. 

5. Position the carrier unit over the logic board so 
that the front of the carrier is approximately one- 
half inch from the front of the case. 

6. Lower the carrier onto the logic board approximately 
1/2 to 3/4 inches from the front of the case, and then 
push the carrier forward until it snaps into position. 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Take-Apart/ 2.19 



The latch (Figure 16, #1) on the outside rear of the 
carrier goes over the indent on the case side. The 
hole on the right-rear side of the carrier, where the 
screw goes, will line up with the hole in the logic 
board. 



• 



IMD 




FIGURE 16 



7. Secure the carrier to the bottom case with the 
Phillips screw (Figure 16, #2). 

8. Connect the 20-pin floppy cable to the connector on 
the logic board. 

9. Connect the 50-pin cable connector to the connector 
on the logic board by aligning the connector over 
the pins and then pushing down on the connector. 

10. Connect the power connector to the hard disk 
printed circuit board. 

11. Replace the power supply . 

12. Replace the top lid . 






2.20 / Take-Apart 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 



□ RESET/INTERRUPT SWITCH 



If the reset/interrupt switch is installed, it must be 
removed before you can remove the main logic board. 



Remove 



Using one finger, lift up on the center tab 
(Figure 17, #1) of the switch. This action releases 
the switch from the logic board. 




FIGURE 17 

2. Lift the rear of the loosened switch up and away 
from the front of the case. You may have to wiggle 
the switch a little to get it to come away from the 
case. But do not force the switch; it can break easily. 



Replace 



Insert the front end of the switch (Figure 17, #2) down 
and into the two slots at the right-front bottom of the 
case. As the tabs on the front of the switch go into the 
slots, push the rest of the switch down until it snaps 
under the edge of the main logic board. 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Take-Apart / 2.21 



□ MAIN LOGIC BOARD 



Remove 



1. Remove the top lid . 

2. Remove interface cards . 

3. Remove the power supply . 

4. Remove the disk drive carrier . 

5. Remove the reset/interrupt switch Of installed! 

6. Remove the speaker bracket . 

7. Slide the logic board toward the front of the case 
until it stops. 

8. Gently begin lifting the front end of the logic board 
up and out; the back end will follow. Lift the board 
completely out of the case. 



. 



Replace 



1. Insert the logic board into the case, back end first, 
so that its connectors gently align with the openings 
in the back of the bottom case. 

2. Lay the board flat on the bottom, making sure that 
the slots in the logic board fit over the tabs on the 
bottom of the case. 

Note: Before sliding the logic board toward the 
rear of the case, make sure that all the metal 
grounding tabs that surround the port holes on the 
rear of the case are not folded in front of the port 
holes. These metal tabs should press against the 
logic board connectors to form a common ground 
shield when the board is pushed in place. If a tab is 
accidentally folded over in front of the hole and the 
board is pushed against it, the tab could break off or 
the port hole could be blocked. 

3. Slide the logic board toward the rear of the case as 
far as it will go. You should feel and hear a slight 
thump. 

4. Replace the reset/interrupt switch (only if needed). 

5. Replace the speaker bracket . 

6. Replace the disk drive carrier . 



2.22 /Take-Apart 



Sep 89 



Macintosh llci 



7. Replace the power supply . 

8. Replace the interface cards (any that were removed). 

9. Replace the top lid . 



Macintosh I lei Sep 89 Take-Apart / 2.23 






# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llci 



Section 3 - Diagnostics 



□ CONTENTS 



3.2 Introduction to MacTest Ilcx/IIci 

3.3 Copying the Disk 

3.3 Using Your Backup Disk 

3.4 Running MacTest Ilcx/IIci 

3.4 Starting MacTest Ilcx/IIci 

3.5 Helpful Startup Information 

3.6 Installing the Loopbacks 

3.7 Using the MacTest Ilcx/IIci Menus 
3.12 Running the Tests 

3.14 Diagnostic Sound Sampler 

3.14 Introduction 

3.14 Procedure 

3.15 Introduction to AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci 

3.16 Running AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci 

3.16 Setting Up the Test Station and UUT 

3.18 Establishing Communication 

3.19 Using the AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci Menus 
3.22 Running the Tests 

3.24 Helpful Suggestions 

3.25 SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure 
3.25 Determining If a Jumper Is Needed 

3.25 Identifying a New Card 

3.26 External Jumpers on Old Cards 
3.26 Summary 

3.26 Installing the Jumper 



Note: MacTest Ilcx/IIci version 2.0 does not include 
test looping at this time. The looping feature will be 
added to a future version of the diagnostic. 



Macintosh llci 



rev. Feb 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.1 



□ INTRODUCTION TO MacTest llcx/llci 



I 



The MacTest™ Ilcx/IIci diagnostic disk (version 2.0 or 
higher) is part of the AppleCAT™ Ilcx/IIci diagnostic 
set but may also be used as a stand-alone confidence 
test of the Macintosh Ilci system. The MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
disk includes the system folder, the MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
program, and the Diagnostic Sound Sampler. The 
Diagnostic Sound Sampler lets you listen to the various 
musical chord sequences that are generated during a 
power-on failure. 

MacTest Ilcx/IIci is a pass/fail confidence test. As the 
test progresses, messages on the screen indicate the 
tests being performed and the test results. As soon as a 
failure is detected, the test stops and the screen 
indicates which module must be replaced before the 
test can be completed. MacTest Ilcx/IIci then 
terminates and returns to the Finder (desktop). 

The MacTest Ilcx/IIci program identifies the ROM 
version of the system and tests the following items: 

• Main logic board 

• Internal disk drive 

• External disk drive 

• NuBus video cards 

High-resolution color 

Color 

Monochrome 

Portrait 

Two-page 

MacTest Ilcx/IIci also provides test patterns for use in 
adjusting the high-resolution monitors. 

MacTest Ilcx/IIci does not test the internal or external 
SCSI hard disk. To test the hard disk, use the Apple 
Hard Disk Test disk (see Section 3, Diagnostics, in SCSI 
Hard Disk Drives Technical Procedures). 

MacTest Ilcx/IIci does not support the Macintosh nci 
Cache Card. The card must be removed prior to running 
the diagnostic. 






3.2 / Diagnostics rev. Jul 90 Macintosh Ilci 



MacTest Ilcx/IIci tests an internal NuBus expansion 
slot only when an Apple expansion card is installed. To 
test a NuBus expansion slot, install a NuBus video card 
in the slot and select the appropriate test from the Test 
Selections window. 



Copying the 
Disk 



Use Finder to make a backup disk before you begin! 

When testing a defective Macintosh Ilci, it is possible 
to damage or erase a section of the MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
disk. 



Using Your 
Backup Disk 



Take the following precautions when using your 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk copy: 

• Do not write-protect your working copy of the 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk. The program will not run 
correctly if you do. 

• Do not change the name of the diagnostic program 
on the disk. During logic board testing, the machine 
reboots, looks for, and restarts the diagnostic named 
MacTest™ cx/ci (notice that "11" is omitted from the 
CPU designations, due to character string 
constraints). If the name has been changed, the 
startup routine will not be able to locate the 
program and the system will stay at the desktop. 

If the MacTest™ Ilcx/IIci window does not reappear 
after a logic board test, check the name of the 
diagnostic icon on the desktop. Correct it to 
MacTest™ cx/ci; then select Set Startup from the 
desktop Special menu. When you are asked Upon 
Startup automatically open: MacTest™ cx/ci, click OK. 
Then double-click the corrected MacTest™ cx/ci icon 
when you return to the test program. 

It is important that the program name does not change. 
If the program name is changed, the diagnostic may not 
work. 



Macintosh I lei 



Jan 90 



Diagnostics / 3.3 



□ RUNNING MacTest llcx/ilci 



Materials Required 



System 6.04 or higher 

MacTest™ Ilcx/IIci diagnostic disk (backup) 

Mini-DIN-8-to-mini-DIN-8 serial port cable 

SCSI loopback test card (modified with jumper — see 

"SCSI Loopback Jumper Procedure") 
Known-good blank 800K disk for drive test 
Known-good blank 1.4 MB disk for FDHD drive test 
Macintosh Ilci or Ilex 



i 



Starling 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci 



You can use MacTest Ilcx/IIci to perform a confidence 
test of the entire Macintosh Ilci system, or you can use 
it to test a single component in a known-good system. 
Follow the start-up steps below for the testing you 
wish to perform. 



Testing the 
Complete System 
or Logic Board 



1. If you are testing a complete Macintosh Ilci system, 
or if you intend to run the logic board tests, turn 
the power off. 



Note: The application is shipped with the default 
setting to run all tests. 

2. Install the loopback connectors as described under 
"Installing the Loopbacks," later in this section. 

3. Insert the MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk into the internal 
drive, and switch on the system. MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
will display the Status window (Figure 1). From the 
Status window you can click Start to run the tests. 



Mac Test™ Mch. 



> "• ri i 



c 



Pause 




Status: 

Click Start to begin selected tests. 



FIGURE 1 



3.4 / Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilci 






Testing a 

Single 

Component 



1. If you are testing a single component in a known- 
good system, insert the MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk into 
the internal drive, and switch on the system. 

2. If you selected the SCSI loopback test, MacTest 
Ilcx/IIci will display a window that tells you to 
turn off the power and connect the SCSI loopback 
board. Click OK to get to the MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
Status window. 



From the Status window you can use the MacTest 
Ilcx/IIci menus. Go to the Options menu and use 
the Test Selections submenu to select the tests you 
want to run. Click OK to exit the Test Selections 
window. 

From the Status window, click Start. For more 
specific information on the tests, see "Using the 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci Menus" and "Running the Tests," 
later in this section. 



Helpful Startup 
Information 



If any of the following problems are encountered, 
refer to Section 4, Troubleshooting, for additional 
information: 



• The known-good MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk will not 
boot. 

• The Configuration window does not show the 
installed interface card(s). 

• The Configuration window indicates there are no 
disk drives installed, or that fewer drives are 
installed than is the case. 

• The Macintosh Ilci system intermittently locks up 
during the tests. 

• The Configuration window indicates the wrong 
amount of RAM installed. 

If you do not know whether the system you are testing 
is good, 

• Run the MacTest Ilcx/IIci logic, drive, and video 
card tests. (See "Using the MacTest Ilcx/IIci Menus" 
and "Running the Tests," later in this section.) 
Complete any needed repairs before you continue. 



Macintosh Ilci 



Jan 90 



Diagnostics / 3.5 



If you removed any expansion cards, install them 
one at a time, and run the MacTest Ilcx/IIci logic, 
drive, and monitor tests after each card is installed. 
Repeat the install-and-test process until all 
expansion cards are installed and the Macintosh Ilci 
passes all tests. 



i 



Installing the 
Loopbacks 



If you are running the serial test or the SCSI loopback 
test, you must connect either the serial loopback cable 
or the SCSI loopback card — along with the keyboard, 
the mouse, and the monitor. 



CAUTION: Always switch off the system when you 
connect or disconnect the SCSI loopback card. 

The SCSI loopback card cable (Figure 2, #1) must be 
connected to the SCSI port (Figure 2, #2) on the back 
of the Macintosh Ilci. (No other connections between 
the card and the Macintosh Ilci are necessary.) To 
protect the SCSI circuitry, you must have the power off 
when you connect the SCSI card. The loopback cable 
(Figure 2, #3) with the mini DIN-8 connectors must be 
installed between the modem and printer ports 
(Figure 2, #4) on the rear of the machine. 



yMmw///////i i \\\\\n^^^^ b 




FIGURE 2 



3.6 / Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilci 



Using the 
MacTest llcx/llci 
Menus 



Before you start MacTest Ilcx/IIci, you can use the 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci menus to select the tests you want to 
run or to select other features of the diagnostic. You 
cannot use the menus when the tests are running. 



Options Menu 



The Options menu contains the Test Selections and 
Configuration submenus. 

1. Test Selections: The following window (Figure 3) 
appears when you chose Test Selections: 



Macintosh IIch/IIcj Te*t Selections 


SI Logic lest 


Uldeo Tests: 




<S> snort O Long hhm El Video Card in Slot | 




El video Monitor connected to selected card 




□ w<teo Monitor (;ariri«( iml lo vum-m iMe<* 


Loopback lem: 




[g] SCSI Loopback 




E3 Serial Loopback 


Floppy Disk Drives: 




□ Enter mil Floppy El internal Floppy 


HDD Communication: 




El Keyboard 




EI Mouse 




□ Lm>l> on Te*u 5 


"oie<ted CHncel 


f ? 

0K 









FIGURE 3 

Test Selections allows you to select the tests you 
wish to run and identifies the slot number in which 
the card to be tested is installed. If a NuBus video 
card is not installed in an expansion slot, the 
selection for that test will be dimmed. 

To select a test, click the box next to the name of 
the item to be tested. The box will display an X. 
To deselect the test, click the box again to remove 
the X. When you have selected all the tests you 
wish, click OK. You will be returned to the 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci Status window. 



Macintosh I lei 



Jan 90 



Diagnostics / 3.7 



The tests selectable from the Test Selections 
window are listed below. 



i 



a) Logic verifies the correct functioning of the 
following circuitry on the logic board: 



VIA (Versatile Interface Adapter) 

Apple Stereo Sound Chip 

Clock/PRAM 

FPU (Floating-Point Unit) 

RAM 

Built-in Video Circuit (RBV chip) 

Parity RAM (on parity units only) 



You can select a short RAM test or a long RAM 
test when you have selected Logic Test. The 

running time of the test varies, depending on 
how much memory is installed. At the beginning 
of the RAM test, MacTest Ilcx/IIci indicates the 
maximum running time of the test. 

If you select Logic Test and the host machine is a 
parity Ilci, then you can select parity testing to 
occur during RAM tests. Also, when the logic 
board test runs, a standard A-major chord will be 
generated out of channel A. This chord will be 
heard from the internal speaker. 

Note: When the RAM test is running, you cannot 
interrupt until the test is completed. 

b) SCSI Loopback tests the SCSI chip, the SCSI bus 
signals, and the external SCSI connector. You 
must have the SCSI loopback card connected to 
the external SCSI port when you run this test. 

c) Serial Loopback tests the SCC chip (serial 
communication chip), serial communication 
signals, and the serial connectors. You must 
have the serial loopback cable connected when 
you run this test. 

d) Keyboard Communications confirms that the logic 
board can correctly communicate with the ADB 
keyboard. 

e) Mouse Communications confirms that the logic 
board can correctly communicate with the ADB 
mouse. 






3.8 / Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilci 



Floppy Disk Drives verifies the functioning of 
the 1.4 MB internal, 800K external, or 1.4 MB 
external disk drives, and related circuitry on 
the logic board. 

g) Video card in slot tests a Macintosh II video card 
installed in one of the expansion slots on the 
Macintosh Ilci. If more than one video card is 
installed, you must tell MacTest Ilcx/IIci which 
video card to test, or else the test will default 
to the lowest slot number with a video card in 
it. Enter the slot number of the video card you 
want to test in the box after Video card in slot. 
Use the keyboard to type in the correct slot 
number. 

h) Video monitor connected to a selected card 

displays test patterns that are used to adjust the 
video picture on the high-resolution monitors. 
Video monitor displays test patterns on the 
monitor connected to the selected video card. If 
you are adjusting a second monitor, select the 
other card slot on the video test control. 

Note: The tests for the Apple Macintosh Portrait 
Display and the Two-Page Monochrome Monitor 
require extended memory to display the test 
patterns. Also, these monitors must be connected 
when you boot the system. 

i) Video monitor connected to built-in video 

generates display test patterns to the monitor 
that is connected to the built-in video port. 

Note: The Color/Grayscales selection in the 
control panel (under Monitor CDEV) must be set 
at 16 for the test patterns to display. 

Note: Refer to the appropriate monitor Technical 
Procedures for information about any necessary 
monitor adjustments. 



Macintosh Ilci Jan 90 Diagnostics / 3.9 



j) Loop on all selected tests provides continuous 
running (in sequence) of all selected tests. To 
stop the looping, click the Stop box between 
tests (when the screen displays an arrow and not 
a wristwatch). 

Note: You cannot loop tests 

On both the logic board and drive tests at 
the same time 

When the monitor test is selected 

On the drive tests if any other test is 
selected 

2. Configuration The following window (Figure 4) 
appears when you select Configuration: 



i 



— > Macintosh I lei Configuration <-- 



Memory Size: 5 MB 
ROM Uersion: 1.0 



Slot 1: Macintosh II Portrait Uideo Card 
Slot 2: No Card Detected 
Slot 3: No Card Detected 

EKternal Driue: 800K 
Internal Driue: 800K 



nm 



FIGURE 4 

This window displays the amount of memory; the 
version number of the ROMs; the cards installed in 
expansion slots 1 through 3 of the Macintosh Ilci; 
the current disk drive configuration; what type of 
monitor is connected to the Ilci on-board video; and, 
if the unit has the parity feature, whether parity is 
enabled or disabled. 



3.10 /Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilci 



File Menu 



The File menu displays the following items. Open and 
Close are always dimmed. Save and Stop are sometimes 
dimmed. 



• Open 

• Close 

• Save Test Selections 

• Stop 

• Quit 



[Always dimmed] 
[Always dimmed] 
[Command-S] 
[Command-.] 
[Command-Q] 



Save Test Selections allows you to customize your 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk by saving your selection of tests 
for the next time you use MacTest Ilcx/IIci. Save Test 
Selections is dimmed if no changes have been made. 

Stop ends the diagnostic and returns you to the MacTest 
Ilcx/IIci Status window. 

Quit returns you to the desktop. 



Apple Menu 



The Apple (#) menu contains the following three 
selections: 



About MacTest Ilcx/IIci displays a dialog box with 
the diagnostic name, the version number, and the 
date of release. 

Control Panel allows you to set preferences for 
speaker volume, monitor status, desktop pattern, and 
mouse tracking. 

Key Caps displays a window with a keyboard. Press 
each key on the keyboard and verify that the 
display block for the key is highlighted. If the key 
is not highlighted, the keyswitch is bad and should 
be replaced. If numerous keys are not highlighted, 
exchange the keyboard. 



Macintosh I lei 



Jan 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.11 



Running 
the Tests 



After selecting the tests you wish to run using 
Test Selections, you are ready to start MacTest Ilcx/IIci. 
Click the Start box in the MacTest Ilcx/IIci Status 
window. Please note the following: 

• The Status line at the bottom of the MacTest 
Ilcx/IIci window keeps you informed of the tests 
being performed and the test results. 

• While running, all tests display a wristwatch. There 
is no other moving or flashing indicator that tells 
you the test is in progress. 

• You cannot stop while the cursor is a wristwatch; 
you can stop only while the cursor, is a pointer. 

• If the SCSI test is selected and the loopback card is 
missing or improperly installed, you are instructed 
to turn off the power, disconnect all external SCSI 
drives, and connect the SCSI loopback card. 

• If the serial test is selected and the loopback cable 
is missing or improperly installed, the testing will 
begin, but the serial ports test will fail. You will 
be instructed to make sure the serial loopback cable 
is connected, and then to click Continue to retry the 
failed test. (You may connect the serial loopback 
cable without switching off the system.) 

• When testing the disk drives, you are prompted to 
insert and remove blank 800K and FDHD disks. 
Perform the disk swaps as directed on the screen, 
and then click OK. 



i 



Note: It is important to insert the requested low- or 
high-density disk. If the wrong disk is inserted, 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci will indicate that the disk drive is 
malfunctioning when it may not be. 

CAUTION: Do not press the reset or interrupt switch 
while the RAM test is running. Pushing reset causes the 
RAM test to fail, and pressing interrupt may damage the 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk. 






3.12/ Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh I lei 



• You can halt the testing by clicking Stop or Pause 
between tests while the cursor is a pointer (except 
during the RAM test and the floppy disk test). 

- Choose Stop to halt the testing and to return to 
the MacTest Ilcx/IIci Status window. Choose 
Start to begin the testing sequence again. 

- Choose Pause to discontinue testing temporarily. 
Choose Continue to resume the tests from the 
point of interruption. 

Replace any module that the test indicates is faulty 
(see Section 2, Take-Apart). Before replacing the 
module, use AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci or refer to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, to verify the diagnosis. If the system 
is still not operating properly, turn to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, for more information. 

If all tests pass, the Macintosh Ilci returns to the 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci Status window. The message All 
selected tests have passed displays on the Status line. 

When in the looping tests, a looping counter will show 
how many complete loops have been done. 



Macintosh Ilci Jan 90 Diagnostics / 3.13 



□ DIAGNOSTIC SOUND SAMPLER 



Introduction 



i 



The Diagnostic Sound Sampler enables you to listen to 
and become familiar with the Macintosh error chords. 
Error chords are brief, musical tones that indicate 
whether the system is functioning correctly or if there 
is a hardware problem. 

Refer to Section 4, Troubleshooting, for complete 
information on startup and error chords. 



Materials Required 



Known-good Macintosh Ilci system 
MacTest Ilcx/IIci (backup) 



Procedure 



1. Set up the Macintosh Ilci system. 

2. Insert the MacTest Ilcx/IIci backup disk. A window 
appears. 

3. Click Quit from the File menu. The desktop 
appears. 

4. Open the disk or folder and then the Diagnostic 
Sound Sampler. A window listing the various chords 
and chord sequences displays. Select the ones you 
wish to hear. 

5. On completion, click Quit. 



3.14/ Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilci 



□ INTRODUCTION TO AppleCAT llcx/IIci 



AppleCAT® llcx/IIci is a diagnostic tool that uses a 
known-good Macintosh to diagnose module failures in 
defective Macintosh Ilci. The known-good Macintosh 
(test station) and defective Macintosh Ilci (unit under 
test, or UUT) are connected through their modem 
communication ports. The test station performs the 
following functions: 



Establishes communications with the UUT 

Calls tests in the UUT ROM 

Downloads tests to the faulty machine 

Calls tests from MacTest in the UUT disk drive 

Displays test results on the test station screen 

Identifies the failing module 

Prompts the technician for information 

Recommends a repair procedure 



With AppleCAT llcx/IIci, the unit under test does not 
have to be fully operational. By using an independent, 
working computer to do the diagnosis, AppleCAT 
llcx/IIci depends very little on the unit under test 
(UUT), making the test results more reliable and 
thorough than traditional diagnostic methods. 

Standard windows guide the technician through each 
stage of the diagnostic. When the UUT fails a test or 
indicates a problem, an AppleCAT llcx/IIci screen asks 
for more information or recommends a repair. 

After each module replacement or adjustment, AppleCAT 
llcx/IIci reruns all the prior tests to verify that the 
problem has been fixed. If the UUT successfully 
completes a final system verification, an alert window 
will report All selected tests passed, click start to 
begin- 
There is also a looping mode that allows users to check 
for intermittent RAM failures. This mode is available 
only for testing RAM. 

AppleCAT llcx/IIci does not support the Macintosh nci 
Cache Card. The card must be removed prior to running 
the diagnostic. 



Macintosh Ilci 



rev. Jul 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.15 



□ RUNNING AppIeCAT llcx/IIci 



Materials Required 



Macintosh Ilci (unit under test, or UUT) 

Known-good Macintosh Plus, SE, SE/30, II, IIx, Ilex, or 

Ilci (test station) 
AppIeCAT llcx/IIci diagnostic disk 
MacTest™ llcx/IIci disk 
Known-good blank 800K disk 
Known-good blank 1.4 MB disk 
Programmer's switch for the UUT 
Mini-DIN-8-to-mini-DIN-8 serial port cable 
SCSI loopback card 
Mini-DIN-8 serial loopback plug 
Digital multimeter or volt/ohmmeter 
#2 Phillips screwdriver 
Monitor 
Known-good mouse and keyboard 



i 



Setting Up the 
Test Station 
and UUT 



1. Connect AC power to the test station. 

2. Place the Macintosh Ilci (UUT) next to the test 
station. 



3. Connect AC power to the UUT. 

4. Connect the SCSI loopback card (Figure 5, #1) to 
the SCSI port (Figure 5, #2) on the UUT. 

5. Connect the serial loopback plug to the printer port 
(Figure 5, #3) on the UUT. 




FIGURE 5 



3.16 /Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilci 






6. Connect one end of the serial port cable to the 
modem port (Figure 6, #1) on the UUT. 

7. Connect the other end to the modem port 
(Figure 6, #2) on the test station. 

8. Connect a known-good keyboard and a mouse to the 
ADB ports on the UUT (Figure 6, #3). 

Note: Both a keyboard and a mouse must be 
connected if you want to test either device. 




FIGURE 6 



...Continued on next page 



Macintosh I lei 



Jan 90 



Diagnostics/ 3. 17 



Verify that the programmer's switch (Figure 7) is 
installed. With the front of the Macintosh Ilci 
(UUT) facing you, look at the lower-left corner 
where the two slots are, and see if the switch is 
installed (Figure 7, #1). If it is not installed, then 
you must install one. Refer to Section 2, Take- 
Apart, for installation instructions. 




FIGURE 7 

The programmer's switch has two buttons (Figure 8). 
The left button is the reset switch. Pressing it is 
just like turning the power switch off and back on. 
The right button is an interrupt switch. Pressing 
the interrupt switch places the UUT in interrupt 
mode. 




Reset Interrupt 

FIGURE 8 



3.18/ Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilci 



Establishing 
Communication 



1. Insert the AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci disk into the test 
station, and switch on the test station. 

2. Open the disk icon and then the AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci 
icon. The AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci Start window 
(Figure 9) appears on the test station screen. 



rippleLrtl'i 






t 



start 



P&HKO 



%L, 



^a^sBM 



i 




status: 



FIGURE 9 

3. Make sure that all disks are ejected from the UUT. 

4. Switch on the UUT. If you hear only the boot tone 
(a single chord), you are not in interrupt mode. To 
get into interrupt mode, wait about four seconds per 
megabyte of installed memory, and then press the 
interrupt switch (see Figure 8). When in interrupt 
mode or test mode, the UUT can respond to 
information received over the communication port. 

Note: If the system doesn't automatically go into 
interrupt mode (it will for a RAM failure) and if the 
screen works, a good place to get into interrupt 
mode is when the cursor appears in the upper-left 
corner. 

IMPORTANT: If you hear any additional chords after the 
single boot tone, you are already in interruptAest mode. 
Do not hit the interrupt switch. The Macintosh llci will 
automatically go into interrupt mode if an error is detected 
at power on. 



Macintosh llci 



Jan 90 



Diagnostics/ 3.19 



Note: If the unit boots with the hard disk or with a 
disk that was in the UUT disk drive during power on, 
the time period for pressing the interrupt switch on the 
UUT was missed. If the period was missed, press the 
reset switch on the UUT and start over at step 3. 






Using the 
AppleCAT llcx/llci 
Menus 



Before you start AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci, use the AppleCAT 
Hcx/IIci menus to select the tests you want to run or 
to select other features of the diagnostic. 

Note: Make your test selections before you start 
AppleCAT Changes to the test selections cannot be 
made while AppleCAT is running. If you do not use the 
Test Selections submenu, the default test selection will 
include the logic board and internal drives tests. 

IMPORTANT: Selecting specific tests shortens the 
AppleCA T llcx/llci test, but you may not find all faulty 
modules. Except for not testing the video card, the default 
test selections will ensure a complete system check. 



Options Menu 



The Options menu contains the Test Selections submenu 
(Figure 10). When you choose Test Selections, the 
following window appears: 



AppleCAT I lei (no parity) Test Selections 

<§) Macintosh I lei (non parity) 
O Macintosh I lei (parity) 
O Macintosh IIck 



[3 Logic Board 

13 internal Disk Driue 

□ NuBus LHdeo Card 



□ loop on HflM ten* 

OSiop if a SIMM tmts 

O Continue if <\ SIMM fails 



Canci 



ID I 0K 1 



3.20 / Diagnostics 



FIGURE 10 

Jan 90 



Macintosh I lei 



Test Selections allows you to select certain tests 
individually. To select a test, click the box next to the 
name of the item to be tested. The box will display an 
X. To deselect the test, click the box again to remove 
the X. When you have selected all the tests you wish, 
click the OK button. You will be returned to the 
AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci Start window. 

Note: Test Selections will remain in effect until you 
change them or you reboot AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci. 

• UUT Selection allows you to select one of the 
following: 

Ilci (non-parity) 
Ilci (parity) 

- Ilex 

• Logic Board verifies the correct functioning of the 
following circuitry on the Macintosh Ilci logic 
boards: 

- RBV chip (RAM-Based Video) 

- ROM 

Memory size plus RAM testing 
CPU data bus and address bus 
VIA (Versatile Interface Adapter) 
Internal clock 
Parameter RAM 

- Serial ports (SCC) 

- External SCSI bus 

- PRAM 

NuBus control circuitry (if video card is installed) 

- SWIM (Disk Controller IC) 

- FPU (Floating-Point Unit) 
Apple Stereo Sound Chip 

Note: Although AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci tests the SCSI 
circuitry on the logic board, it does not test the 
external and internal SCSI hard disk. To test the 
hard disk, use the Apple Hard Disk Test disk (see 
Section 3, Diagnostics, in the SCSI Hard Disk Drives 
Technical Procedures). 

• Macintosh n Video Card runs only if you have a 
video card installed. The test checks the video RAM 
on the video card and the video DAC (digital-to- 
analog converter). 



Macintosh Ilci Jan 90 Diagnostics / 3.21 



Internal Drive verifies the proper functioning of the 
drive, cable, and SWIM circuitry. 



i 



File Menu 



The File menu displays the following items. All are 
dimmed except Stop and Quit. 



• Open 


[Dimmed] 


• Close 


[Dimmed unless a desk 




accessory is open] 


• Save Test Selections 




• Stop 


[Command-.] 


• Quit 


[Command-Q] 



Stop ends the diagnostic and returns to the AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci Start window. Under some tests returning to 
the Start window may take awhile. 

Quit exits the program and returns you to the desktop. 



Apple Menu 



The Apple (ft) menu contains the following three 
choices: 



About Diagnostic displays the diagnostic name, 
version number, date of release, serial number, and 
a copy-protect statement. 

Control Panel sets preferences for speaker volume, 
mouse tracking, whether or not AppleTalk is 
connected, and the desktop pattern. 

Key Caps displays a window with a keyboard. 



Running 
the Tests 



After selecting the tests you wish to run using Test 
Selections, you are ready to start AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci. 
Click the Start button in the AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci 
window. Please note the following: 

• The Status line at the bottom of the AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci window keeps you informed of the tests 
being performed and their results. 

Note: If the message Could not establish 

communication appears on the Status line, you may 
have inserted a bootable disk in the UUT disk drive 
before switching the unit on, your Macintosh is 
seriously damaged, or the modem-to-modem 



3.22 / Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh Hoi 






connectors are not installed correctly. If this 
message appears, follow the instructions given in 
the AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci window. 

• AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci interacts with you throughout 
each stage of the testing. When the UUT fails a test 
or indicates a problem, AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci prompts 
you for more information or recommends a repair. 

• By displaying a choice of answers, AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci asks you for information that it cannot 
obtain electronically. Select the most appropriate 
answer for each situation. After selecting a 
response, click OK to continue. 

CAUTION: Do not click the OK button until you've 
completed every instruction given on the screen. Failure 
to complete the instructions may misdirect the diagnostic. 

• If the UUT is turned off to replace or reinstall a 
module: 

a) Verify that all cables and test fixtures are 
reattached before switching on. Do not click the 
OK button until you've completed every 
instruction given on the screen. 

b) Eject any disk from the UUT before switching 
the UUT on. 

c) If you do not hear the test mode chimes, press 
reset, wait about 4 seconds per megabyte of 
RAM, and then press the interrupt switch to get 
into the test mode. 

d) Click Start at the test station to restart the test. 

• AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci will also ask you to perform 
setup steps when checking drives, video cards, and 
the ADB. When the Setup Required window 
appears, insert the requested disk. AppleCAT 
Ilcx/IIci will specify which drive to use. After 
inserting the disk, click Done to continue the test. 
AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci will request the following disks: 

800K disk (blank and write-enabled) 
High-density disk (blank and write-enabled) 
Write-protected MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk 



Macintosh llci Jan 90 Diagnostics / 3.23 



• You may halt the testing by clicking Stop or Pause 
anytime during the tests: 

a) Choose Stop to halt the testing and to return to 
the AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci window. Choose Start to 
begin the testing sequence again from the 
beginning. 

b) Choose Pause to discontinue testing temporarily. 
Choose Continue to resume testing from the 
point of interruption. 

IMPORTANT: Please read all messages and instructions 
carefully. Do only what AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci specifically 
instructs you to do. 

When the UUT passes its final test, an alert window 
will show All selected tests passed, click start to begin. 



< 



Helpful 
Suggestions 



If the unit passes AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci but is still not 
running correctly, refer to Section 4, Troubleshooting, 
for information that can help you isolate the problem. 
Also keep in mind that AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci is unable to 
identify a system failure if any of the following is true: 

• The bad module fails intermittently. 

• The system configuration changes during the test 
(memory is removed or added, or system power is 
removed). 

• Selected modules are tested; except for the video 
card, only the default tests perform a complete 
system check. 

• The replacement module itself is bad. 

• You provided inaccurate input to AppleCAT Ilcx/IIci, 
or set up the test station incorrectly. 



3.24 / Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh llci 



□ SCSI LOOPBACK JUMPER PROCEDURE 



Determining 
If a Jumper 
Is Needed 



In order to use the SCSI loopback card with MacTest™ 
Ilcx/IIci and AppleCAT® Ilcx/IIci, the card must be 
jumpered between pin 25 of Jl and pin 14 of RP1. On 
new SCSI loopback cards, the jumper has been etched 
into the printed circuit. Only cards with the old PCB 
circuitry need the jumper procedure. 



Note: This modification does not interfere with the 
card's use on other Macintosh or Apple II family 
systems, except that to work on Apple II systems the 
card must be connected to a notched mouse cable. (For 
further information on the notched cable, refer to 
Section 5, "SCSI Interface Card" in the SCSI Hard Disk 
Drives Technical Procedures. 



Identifying 
a New Card 



To determine if you have a new card, which will not 
need to be jumpered, look at the back of the card. If 
the jumper is included in the circuitry, there is an A 
instead of double zeros (00) at the end of the part 
number, which is located under the words APPLE 
COMPUTER (Figure 11, #1). These new cards do not 
have to be jumpered. 




FIGURE 11 



Macintosh I lei 



Jan 90 



Diagnostics / 3.25 



External 
Jumpers on 
Old Cards 



Some cards with the 00 part number and the old 
artwork were modified with an external jumper during 
the manufacturing process. Therefore, if your card has a 
00 part number, check to see if it has an external jumper 
from Pin 25 of Jl to pin 14 of RP1 (Figure 12, #1). If it 
has no external jumper, you must install one yourself. 



i 




: woooooaoocMOflow o owoa 



FIGURE 12 



Summary 



To summarize: 

If # on back 
ends with: 
A 



00 



Do this: 

Nothing 

(Jumper is present in artwork.) 

Check to see if external jumper 
is present. If not, install jumper. 



Installing 
the Jumper 



If you find that the card must be jumpered, solder a 
wire connection between pin 25 of Jl and pin 14 of 
RP1, as shown in Figure 12. (The pins are not 
numbered on the board. In the orientation shown in 
Figure 12, pin 25 is the pin closest to the upper-left 
corner of the card; pin 14 is in the middle line of pins 
and closest to the left edge of the card.) 






3.26 / Diagnostics 



Jan 90 



Macintosh I lei 



fk Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llci 

Section 4 - Troubleshooting 



□ CONTENTS 



4.3 


Introduction 


4.3 


General Information 


4.3 


Before You Start 


4.3 


Error Chords 


4.3 


How to Use the Symptom Chart 


4.4 


How to Use the Troubleshooting Flowcharts 


4.5 


Things to Remember 


4.7 


Module Exchange Information 


4.7 


Logic Board Configuration 


4.7 


Internal Hard Disk SCSI 


4.7 


Macintosh llci Cache Card 


4.8 


Startup and Error Chords 


4.8 


Introduction 


4.8 


Startup Chord 


4.8 


Error Chords 


4.9 


Symptom Chart 


4.9 


Built-in Video Problems 


4.10 


Floppy Drive Problems 


4.10 


SCSI Problems 


4.11 


Peripheral Problems 


4.13 


Miscellaneous Problems 


4.14 


Macintosh llci Flowcharts 


4.14 


Flowchart 1 Notes 


4.16 


Flowchart 2 Notes 


4.18 


Flowchart 3 Notes 


4.19 


Flowchart 4 Notes 


4.20 


Flowchart 5 Notes 


4.22 


SIMM Verification 


4.22 


Introduction 


4.23 


Verification 


4.24 


Verification Flowchart Notes 



.Continued on next page 



Macintosh llci 



rev. Nov 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.1 



4.26 Battery Verification 

4.26 Introduction 

4.26 Verification Procedure 



Note: If a step is underlined, instructions for that step 
can be found in Section 2, Take- Apart. 



4.2 / Troubleshooting rev. Nov 90 Macintosh I lei 






□ INTRODUCTION 

General 
Information 



The following three test disks can be used to test 
portions of the Macintosh Ilci system: 

• AppleCAT™ Ilcx/IIci 

• MacTest™ Ilcx/IIci 

• Apple Hard Disk Test 
(version 1.0 or higher) 

Use this troubleshooting section if you are unable to 
boot the MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk, or if the disk is unable 
to detect a module failure. After you repair the system, 
run the test disk again to verify system operation. 



Before 
You Start 



Read the sections titled "Things to Remember," 
"Module Exchange Information," "Startup and Error 
Chords," "SIMM Verification," and "Battery Verification" 
before you begin troubleshooting. You need the 
information provided in these sections to troubleshoot 
the Macintosh Ilci effectively. 



Error Chords 



When switched on, the Macintosh Ilci executes a ROM- 
based self-test. If any part of the self-test fails, a 
sequence of chords will sound. To hear a sample of 
each sequence of chords, listen to the Diagnostic Sound 
Sampler on the MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk. (Refer to 
Section 3, Diagnostics, for more information.) 



How to Use 
the Symptom 
Chart 



To use the symptom chart, first find the symptom that 
most nearly describes the problem; then perform the 
first corrective action on the solution list. If that 
corrective action does not fix the problem, go to the 
next one. If you replace a module and find that the 
problem remains, reinstall the original module before 
you go on to the next action. 

If the symptoms displayed by the Macintosh Ilci are not 
listed in the symptom chart, or if the system is not 
displaying a clearly defined problem, use the flowchart 
sections. 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.3 



How to Use the There are five numbered flowcharts for the 

Troubleshooting Macintosh Ilci. On completion of Flowchart 1, you 

Flowcharts will be instructed to continue to the next flowchart. 

Continue until you complete Flowchart 5. 

Each of the flowcharts includes references to notes that 
are either above the flowchart or on the opposite page. 
These notes provide additional instructions or referrals 
to other procedures. 

Starting at the top of Flowchart 1, answer the questions 
and proceed down the chart. When you arrive at a 
rectangular box containing a list of actions, perform the 
actions in the sequence listed. On completion, return 
to the preceding diamond box. If the problem remains, 
reinstall the original module before you go on to the 
next action. 



4.4 / Troubleshooting Sep 89 Macintosh Ilci 



□ THINGS TO REMEMBER 



ESD 



Follow all electrostatic discharge (ESD) 
precautions when working on the Macintosh Ilci. 
Refer to the You Oughta Know tab in the Apple 
Service Technical Procedures for additional 
information. 



Troubleshooting 
Hints 



2. If available, use a known-good monitor and 

monitor cable. This will isolate the problem to the 
CPU, internal drive, keyboard, or mouse. 



3. Before you begin troubleshooting, remove all 
interface cards and disconnect any external devices 
(printers, SCSI devices, and/or ADB devices other 
than the keyboard and mouse). 

After the Macintosh Ilci has passed the diagnostic 
tests, each expansion card or peripheral must be 
installed and tested. Install one device and test the 
system before adding any other devices. Repeat the 
install-and-test process until all devices have been 
installed and tested. 

4. Mark each known-good SIMM module on the 
exchange logic board with white correction fluid or 
a small sticker to prevent confusion during the 
troubleshooting procedure. 

5. Use a known-good copy of the MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
disk. 



Normal 
Startup Tone 



6. During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
soft chord is emitted. If this does not happen, refer 
to "Startup and Error Chords" for additional 
information. 



System 
Configuration 



7. To ensure that customers get back the same system 
configurations that they bring in, record the 
following information: 






The size of the SCSI hard disk (20 MB, 40 MB, 

80 MB), if one is installed 

SIMM sizes for both banks 

Type and serial number of expansion cards 

If a ROM SIMM is installed 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.5 



System Software 8. Verify that the customer is using System 6.0.4 and 

Finder 6.1. Using earlier versions may destroy data, 
or prevent the unit from booting. 



4.6 / Troubleshooting Sep 89 Macintosh llci 



□ MODULE EXCHANGE INFORMATION 



Logic Board 
Configuration 



The Macintosh Ilci logic board service exchange 
module is shipped without memory SIMMs. 

To make sure that customers always get back the same 
logic board configurations that they brought in, be sure 
to record the following information before you 
exchange any modules: 

• The amount of memory installed and the size of the 
SIMMs in each bank 

• Whether a ROM SIMM is installed 



Internal 
Hard Disk 
SCSI 



The internal 20 MB, 40 MB, and 80 MB SCSI hard disk 
service modules are shipped without the SCSI cable 
connected. Be sure to keep the SCSI cable with the 
customer's Macintosh Ilci system. The SCSI cable is 
sold as a separate replacement part and is not part of 
any module. 

The SCSI power cable is not included with the internal 
SCSI drive modules. You must retain the power cable 
from the old drive to use on the replacement drive. 



Macintosh Ilci 
Cache Card 



Macintosh Ilci Cache cards containing serial numbers 
with the "CF" prefix, e.g., CFXXXXXXX, can cause 
frequent system crashes. These cards should be 
returned to Apple. Additional information can be found 
on AppleLink under the Apple Programs icon. 

The revised Macintosh Ilci Cache card has a serial 
number with an "AF" prefix, e.g., AFXXXXXXX. This 
revised card should function properly; if it fails, return 
it to Apple through standard service channels. 

For diagnostic information on testing the revised 
Macintosh Ilci Cache card, see Section 1, MacTest MP, 
in the Mac Multiple-Product Diagnostics tab. 



Macintosh Ilci 



rev. Apr 91 



Troubleshooting / 4.7 



□ STARTUP AND ERROR CHORDS 



Introduction 



When the Macintosh Ilci is switched on, the ROM 
executes a self-test. If any part of the self-test fails, a 
sequence of chords will sound. To hear a sample of 
each sequence of chords, listen to the "Diagnostic Sound 
Sampler," which is included on the MacTest Ilcx/IIci 
disk. (Refer to Section 3, Diagnostics, for more 
information.) 



If you are unable to interpret the chords, use the 
flowcharts and ignore the question about the startup 
chord on Flowchart 1. 



Startup Chord 



During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
chord is emitted; then a disk icon with a flashing 
question mark is displayed on the screen. If a hard 
disk is installed, then there will not be any question 
mark. 



Error Chords 



If a startup chord and additional chords sound, a blank 
gray screen will usually be displayed. There will 
always be three sequences played if an error is 
encountered during startup: startup chord first, then 
the short, harsh error chord, followed closely by the 
test monitor chord (four chords, from low to high). 



Initial Failure 



If you hear the above sequence, then a failure has 
occured during the initial hardware self-tests. To 
correct the problem: 



1. Exchange only the SIMMs in Bank A. (Refer to 
"SIMM Verification" in this section for complete 
instructions.) 

2. Exchange only the SIMMs in Bank B. (Refer to 
"SIMM Verification" in this section for complete 
instructions.) 

3. If these exchanges do not work, exchange the logic 
board. (Install the customer's SIMM modules on the 
exchange board.) 

4. If the system still does not work, you will need to 
do the SIMM verification with the exchange logic 
board. 



4.8 / Troubleshooting 



Sep 89 



Macintosh Ilci 






□ SYMPTOM CHART 



Built-in Video Problems 



Screen is dark, audio 
and either drive 
operate, fan is running, 
and LED is lit 



Solutions 










1. 


Adjust brightness on monitor. 






2. 


Replace 


monitor. 








3. 


Replace 


video cable. 








4. 


Make sure ROM jumper is on 


(refer to Section 1 


j 




Basics). 










5. 


Replace 


SIMMs (refer to 


"SIMM Verification" in 


this 




section) 










6. 
7. 


Replace 
Replace 


logic board, 
power supply. 









Screen dark, no audio, 
no drive, but fan is 
running and LED 
is lit 



1. Replace video cable. 

2. Replace monitor. 

3. Make sure ROM jumper is on (refer to Section 1, 
Basics). 

4. Remove any NuBus cards, if installed. 

5. Remove any external perherial, if attached. 

6. Replace SIMMs (refer to "SIMM Verification" in this 
section). 

7. Replace logic board. 

8. Replace power supply. 



Partial or whole l. 

screen is bright and 2. 

audio is present, but 3. 
no video information 

is visible 4. 



Replace monitor. 

Replace video cable. 

Make sure ROM jumper is on (refer to Section 1, 

Basics). 

Replace logic board only. 



Screen is completely 
dark, fan is not 
running, and LED is 
not lit 



1. Plug the monitor directly into the wall socket, and 
verify that the monitor has power. 

2. NuBus cards drawing more than 45 Watts. Remove 
the NuBus card and try power up again. 

3. Remove any external perherial if attached. 

4. Replace power supply. 

5. Replace logic board only. 






Note: If replacing the monitor will correct the 
problem, refer to the appropriate Technical Procedures 
to obtain replacement information. 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.9 



Floppy Drive Problems 



Solutions 



i 



Audio and video 
present, but 
internal drive 
does not operate 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Verify that all external SCSI devices are 
disconnected. 

3. Replace internal disk drive cable. 

4. Replace internal disk drive. 

5. Replace logic board only. 

6. Replace power supply. 



Disk ejects; display 
shows icon with 
blinking "X" 



1. Replace disk with known-good system disk. 

2. Replace internal disk drive cable. 

3. Replace internal disk drive. 

4. Replace logic board only. 



Will not eject 
disk 



1. Switch off system and hold mouse button down 
while switching on. 

2. Try ejecting disk manually. 

3. Replace disk drive. 



Attempts to eject 
disk, but doesn't 



1. Try pushing disk completely back in. 

2. Try ejecting disk manually. 

3. Replace disk drive. 



SCSI Problems 



Solutions 



• Internal disk drive 
runs continuously 



1. Replace bad disk. 

2. Replace internal disk drive cable. 

3. Replace internal disk drive. 

4. Replace logic board only. 



Internal hard disk 
will not operate 



1. Replace SCSI cable connector. 

2. Replace SCSI power connector. 

3. Replace hard disk. 

4. Replace logic board only. 



4.10 / Troubleshooting 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 






Peripheral Problems 



Works with internal or 
external SCSI device 
but will not work 
with both 



Solutions 



1. Verify that SCSI select level switch on external 
device is set to a different priority from internal. 

2. Replace terminator on the external device. 

3. Verify terminator is installed on the internal SCSI 
drive. 

4. Replace SCSI device select cable. 



Cursor does not move 



1. 

2. 
3. 



4. 



5. 



Reboot system. 

Check mouse connection. 

If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect the 

mouse to a rear ADB port instead, and disconnect 

the keyboard. If mouse works, keyboard should be 

replaced. 

If mouse does not work in any ADB port, replace 

mouse. 

Replace logic board only. 



Cursor moves, but l. 

clicking the mouse 2. 

button has no effect 



Replace mouse. 

Replace logic board only. 



Cannot double-click 
to open an application, 
disk, or server 



l. 

2. 



3. 



4. 



5. 



Remove any multiple system files on the hard disk. 

Clear parameter RAM. Hold down the 

<Shift><Option><Command> keys and select 

Control Panel from the Apple menu. Reset mouse 

controls. 

If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect it to < 

rear ADB port instead. If mouse works, keyboard 

should be replaced. 

If mouse does not work in any ADB port, replace 

mouse. 

Replace main logic board. 



No response to any 
key on the keyboard 



1. Check keyboard connection to ADB port. 

2. Replace keyboard cable. 

3. Replace keyboard. 

A. Replace logic board only. 



Macintosh Hoi 



Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.11 



Known-good 
I mage Writer or 
Image Writer II 
will not print 



1. Make sure System 6.0.4 and Finder 6.1 (or higher) 
are used. 

2. Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 
are set correctly. 

3. Replace printer interface cable. 

4. Replace logic board only. 



Known-good 
LaserWriter 
will not print 



1. Make sure System 6.0.4 and Finder 6.1 (or higher) 
are used. 

2. Make sure that the Chooser and the Control Panel 
are set correctly. 

3. Refer to the Networks tab in the Apple Service 
Technical Procedures for more information. 



Miscellaneous Problems Solutions 



Clicking, chirping, 
or thumping sound 



1. Replace power supply. 

2. Disconnect HDA; replace if noise disappears. 

3. Replace logic board only. 



System shuts down 
intermittently 



1. 



2. 
3. 

4. 



Make sure air vents on the back side and top of the 
main unit are kept clear. Thermal protection 
circuitry may shut down the system. After 30 to 40 
minutes, the system should be OK. 
Replace power cable. 
Replace power supply. 
Replace logic board only. 



System intermittently 
crashes or locks up 



1. Make sure System 6.0.4 and Finder 6.1 (or higher) 
are being used. 

2. Make sure software is known-good. 

3. Replace logic board only. 

4. Replace SIMMs (refer to "SIMM Verification" in this 
section). 

5. Replace power supply. 

6. If the system contains a Macintosh Ilci Cache Card, 
refer to "Module Exchange Information" earlier in 
this section. 



4.12 / Troubleshooting 



rev. Nov 90 



Macintosh Ilci 






Miscellaneous Problems 
(continued) 



Solutions 



No sound from 
speaker 



1. Verify that the volume setting in the Control Panel 
is set to 1 or above. 

2. Replace speaker. 

3. Replace logic board only. 



Clock not 
running 



1. Replace battery (see "Battery Verification" in this 
section). 

2. Replace logic board only. 



Systems seems to 
boot then message 
"Finder is old version" 
displays 



1. Clear parameter RAM by holding down the 
<Command> <Option> <P> <R> keys and re-booting 
the system. Keep these keys held down. You will 
hear the normal startup chords and about two 
seconds later you will get another chord. This 
means the parameter RAM has been cleared. 

2. Replace logic board only. 



MacTest and 
AppleCAT crash 
when run on the 
lid 



Remove the Macintosh Ilci Cache Card and rerun the 
diagnostic. 



System intermittently 
doesn't power on 



1. Check cables. 

2. Plug the monitor directly into the wall socket, and 
verify that the monitor has power. 

3. Try a known-good keyboard and ADB cable. 

4. Replace power cord. 

5. Check batteries (refer to "Battery Verification"). 

6. Unplug the power cord from the system for 
approximately 5 to 10 minutes; plug the power cord 
back in and turn on the system. If the system starts 
up normally, replace the power supply. 

7. Replace logic board only. 



Macintosh Ilci 



rev. Nov 90 



Troubleshooting / 4.13 



□ MACINTOSH llci FLOWCHARTS 



Flowchart 1 
Notes 



1. During a normal startup sequence, a medium- 
pitched soft chord is emitted. If this does not 
happen, refer to "Startup and Error Chords" for 
additional information. If you cannot interpret the 
chords, continue with the flowchart. 



2. If exchanging the monitor will correct the problem, 
refer to the Apple High-Res Monochrome Monitor, 
Apple High-Res RGB Monitor, or the Apple Two- 
Page Monochrome Monitor Technical Procedures to 
isolate the monitor problem to the module level. 

3. There are two steps to perform when exchanging 
the SIMM modules. Refer to "SIMM Verification" 
for complete instructions on verifying and 
troubleshooting the SIMMs. 

4. If the known-good SIMMs do not correct the 
problem, install the customer's SIMMs on the 
replacement logic board. 



4.14 / Troubleshooting 



Sep 89 



Macintosh llci 



YES 



1 



Goto 
Flow- 
chart 2. 






YES 



i 



Goto 
Flow- 
chart 4. 



CStoiQ 



i 



Power on the system 
without installing a disk. 




Interpret error 

chords. (See 

Note #1.) 



Power off. If a hard disk is installed, 

disconnect the SCSI power connector 

and cable connector. 



i 



Power on the Macintosh llci system without 
installing a disk. 




i 



Goto 
Flow- 
chart 3. 



1. Exchange monitor. (See Note #2.) 

2. Exchange video cable. 

3. Exchange SIMMs. (See Note #3.) 

4. Exchange logic board only. 
(See Note #4.) 

5. Exchange power supply. 



1. Exchange SIMMs. (See Note #3.) 

2. Exchange logic board only. 
(See Note #4.) 

3. Exchange power supply. 



c 



i 



Go to Flowchart 4. 



j 



c 



Go to Flowchart 3. 



j 



Macintosh llci 



Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.15 



Flowchart 2 1. Refer to Section 3, Diagnostics, for complete 

Notes information. 

2. Refer to the SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures for complete instructions. 

3. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



4.16/ Troubleshooting Sep 89 Macintosh llci 



Shut down and install 

another MacTest I lei disk. 

Power on. 




Power off. If a hard disk is installed, 

remove the SCSI power and cable 

connector, or any external drive. 



i 



Insert MacTest llci disk. Power on. 




Run MacTest llci. (See Note #1 .) 


T 


C 


Go to Flowchart 5. 


) 



C Flowchart 2 ) 




Run MacTest llci. (See Note #1 .) 



i 



Run Apple Hard Disk Test. (See Note #2.) 



i 



( END ) 



Run MacTest llci. (See Note #1 .) 



Run Apple Hard Disk Test. (See Note #2.) 
f END ^ 



1. Exchange drive cable. 

2. Exchange drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board 
only. (See Note #3.) 



Macintosh llci 



Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.17 



Flowchart 3 
Notes 



1. If exchanging the monitor will correct the 

problem, refer to the Apple High-Res Monochrome 
Monitor, Apple High-Res RGB Monitor, or the Apple 
Two-Page Monochrome Monitor Technical 
Procedures to isolate the monitor problem to the 
module level. 



* 



2. There are two steps to perform when exchanging 
the SIMM modules. Refer to "SIMM Verification" 
for complete instructions on verifying and 
troubleshooting the SIMMs. 

3. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



( Flowchart 3 ) 




V 


1 . Exchange power supply. 

2. Exchange logic board 
only. (See Note #3.) 


v 


f Go to Flowchart 4. J 



1. Exchange monitor. 
(See Note #1.) 

2. Exchange video cable. 

3. Exchange SIMMs. 
(See Note #2.) 

4. Exchange logic board. 
(See Note #3.) 

5. Exchange power supply. 



4.18 / Troubleshooting 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 



Flowchart 4 
Notes 



1. Refer to Section 3, Diagnostics, for complete 
information. 



2. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 



( Flowchart 4 ) 



Insert MacTest llci disk. Power on or reboot. 




Run MacTest llci. (See Note #1 .) 



C Goto 



i 



Flowchart 5. 



:> 



1. Exchange drive cable. 

2. Exchange disk drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange Idgic board only. 
(See Note #2.) 



Macintosh llci 



Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.19 



Flowcharts 
Notes 



1. Refer to Section 3, Diagnostics, for complete 
information. 



i 



2. Refer to SCSI Hard Disk Drives Technical 
Procedures for complete instructions. 

3. Install the customer's SIMMs on the replacement 
logic board. 

4. Customers must always get back the same system 
configurations they bring in. Refer to "Module 
Exchange Information" in this section. 



4.20 / Troubleshooting 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 



C Flowcharts ) 

1 






Power off. Reconnect the 

SCSI drive (if installed). 

Power on. 




Jr 


>/ Does the desktop or ^ Ss v. ^q 
^^^ a disk jf^opi wjfh a flashing ^^> — ^». 


1 . Exchange SCSI power and 
connector cable. 

2. Exchange SCSI drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange logic board only. 
(See Note #3.) 


^^^^ question mark appear? ^^^ 

^^Tyes 


f 






Insert MacTest Hoi disk. Power on. 




1 






^^^ Does the test ^^N. N0 


1 . Exchange SCSI power and 
connector cable. 

2. Exchange SCSI drive. 

3. Exchange power supply. 

4. Exchange bgic board only. 
(See Note #3.) 


^s^^ screen appear? ^ ^>~ ^ 
j*YES 








Run MacTest llci. (See Note #1.) 




* 




Run Apple Hard Disk Test. (See Note #2.) 




♦ 




Customer has correct configuration. 
(See Note #4.) 




jL 




Q END ) 






Macintosh llci 



Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.21 



□ SIMM VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



The service exchange logic board comes without RAM 
SIMMs. 



i 



Isolating to 
the Customer's 
SIMMs 



The SIMMs installed on the customer's logic board may 
be defective. To verify this, you will be removing all 
of the customer's SIMMs and installing known-good 
SIMMs. Mark each known-good SIMM with a dot of 
white correction fluid or a small sticker. Whatever you 
use, be sure it will not come off while you are testing. 



1. Remove the top cover . 



CAUTION: Before removing the SIMMs, be sure to use 
proper ESD procedures. If an ESD pad is not available, 
touch bare metal on the power supply before proceeding. 
Failure to do so can result in damage to the logic board. 

2. Remove the customer's SIMMs , using the SIMM 
removal tool. See You Oughta Know for SIMM tool 
use. 

Note: Record the number and the sizes of the 
SIMMs. The customer should get the same number 
and sizes back! Refer to Section 5, Additional 
Procedures, for information on identifying the 
SIMMs. 

3. Install the four known-good SIMMs in Bank A 
(Figure 1, #1). 

Note: You must use only SIMMs with 80 ns fast 
page mode DRAMs. Do not use SIMMs with 100, 
120, or 150 ns DRAMs. Also, if the customer's 
SIMMs are parity SIMMs (9-bit), you must replace 
them with know-good parity SIMMs. 

4. Switch on the system. 

5. Insert the MacTest Ilcx/IIci disk. 

If the test boots, run it. Then continue with the 
appropriate verification procedure. 

If the test does not boot, return to the appropriate 
flowchart. 



4.22 / Troubleshooting 



Sep 89 



Macintosh llci 




Verification 



If the customer has 256K SIMMs or 1 MB SIMMs 
installed, you will need to verify all of them. Use the 
flowchart and referenced notes on the next two pages 
to perform the verification of the SIMMs. 



Materials Required 



If verifying 256K SIMMs, you will need four known- 
good 256K SIMMs. 

If verifying 1 MB SIMMs, you will need four known- 
good 1 MB SIMMs. 

If verifying 1 MB x 9-bit SIMMs (parity), you will need 
four known-good 1 MB x 9-bit SIMMs. 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.23 



Verification 

Flowchart 

Notes 



1. Locate Bank A on the logic board and install 
three known-good SIMMs (Figure 1, #1). 

2. During a normal startup sequence, a medium-pitched 
soft chord is emitted; then a disk icon with a 
flashing question mark is displayed on the screen. 
If either of these things does not happen, refer to 
"Startup and Error Chords" for additional 
information. 



i 



3. Be sure to set the defective SIMM where it will not 
be mixed up with the others. 

4. Return to the beginning of the flowchart and 
perform the same procedure for Bank B 
(Figure 1, #2). 



4.24 / Troubleshooting 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 



f Verification Flowchart J 



Install three known-good 

SIMMs into Bank A. 

(See Note #1.) 



i 



Install one of the customer's SIMMs 
into the empty slot in Bank A. 



Remove another 

known-good 

SIMM. 




Power off the system. 

Remove and set aside the 

customer's bad SIMM. 

(See Note #3.) 



Repeat for Bank B. (See Note #4.) 



C END \ 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Troubleshooting / 4.25 



□ BATTERY VERIFICATION 



Introduction 



There is one lithium battery on the Macintosh Ilci logic 
board. This battery maintains the clock and PRAM 
while the unit is powered off. 

WARNING: Lithium batteries, the type used in the 
Macintosh Ilci, have some potential for explosion if 
improperly handled. Follow the procedure below exactly 
as written. 



i 



Materials Required 



Voltmeter 



Verification 
Procedure 



To check the lithium battery with a voltmeter, 

1. Be sure power is off. Then remove the top lid . 

2. Remove the power supply . 

3. Remove the drive carrier . 

4. Set the voltmeter range to measure 10 volts DC. 

5. Touch and hold the positive probe of the voltmeter 
to the positive side of the battery (Figure 2, #1). 



- /V: 













FIGURE 2 



4.26 / Troubleshooting 



Sep 89 



Macintosh Ilci 



4. Touch and hold the ground probe of the voltmeter to 
the negative side of the battery. 

5. The reading for a good battery should be above 2.8 
volts. If the battery falls below 2.8 volts, replace it. 
Refer to Section 5, Additional Procedures, for 
replacement instructions. 






Macintosh llci Sep 89 Troubleshooting / 4.27 



4 Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llci 

Section 5 - Additional Procedures 



□ CONTENTS 








5.3 


Battery Replacement 




5.3 


Storage and Handling 




5.3 


Disposal 




5.6 


Logic Board RAM Identification and Upgrades 




5.6 


Introduction 




5.6 


Identification 




5.7 


Upgrades 



Note: If a step is underlined, instructions for that step 
can be found in Section 2, Take- Apart. 






Macintosh llci 



Sep 89 



Additional Procedures / 5.1 






□ BATTERY REPLACEMENT 






WARNING: A lithium battery, the type used in the 
Macintosh llci, has some potential for explosion if 
improperly handled. 



Storage and 
Handling 



Take the following precautions when storing and 
handling lithium batteries: 

• When Apple's lithium battery is shipped to you, it is 
sealed in an individual zip-lock wrapper. When you 
receive it, check to make sure the wrapper is intact. 
If it is not, mend the wrapper before you store the 
battery. 

• Store the battery in the packaging in which you 
received it. 

• The storage area for lithium batteries should be 
well marked, and access to the area should be 
restricted. 

• Never store batteries together where they may 
short together or explode. 



Disposal 



Lithium batteries cannot be recharged and will require 
disposal when "dead." You cannot throw them away as 
you would other batteries: lithium is water-reactive, in 
addition to being potentially explosive. Lithium 
batteries must be disposed of as hazardous waste. 

WARNING: "Dead" lithium batteries are considered 
hazardous waste and must be returned to Apple in their 
original packaging for disposal following EPA guidelines. 

Because of this hazard, Apple recommends the following 
course of action: 

After removing a "dead" battery from a board, place the 
battery in the zip-lock wrapper and original packaging 
from which the replacement battery was taken. Mark 
the battery DEAD and return it to Apple, where it will 
be disposed of following EPA guidelines. 



Macintosh llci 



Sep 89 



Additional Procedures / 5.3 



The long-life lithium battery in the Macintosh Ilci 
should serve many years. Refer to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting, to check the condition of the battery. 
If the battery should fail for some reason, replace it 
according to the following procedure. 



Materials Required 



Grounded workbench and wriststrap 



CAUTION: Use ESD precautions before removing or 
replacing the battery. Failure to do so may result in logic 



board failure. 



Remove 



1. Remove the logic board . 



2. Locate the battery holder (Figure 1, #1) and battery 
(Figure 1, #2) toward the front of the logic board. 




FIGURE 1 



5.4 / Additional Procedures 



Sep 89 



Macintosh Ilci 



4. 



On one side of the battery holder, insert a small 
(1/8") flat-blade screwdriver into the top 
(Figure 1, #3) and gently push the screwdriver 
down until the side tab (Figure 1, #4) pushes out. 
The battery holder cover will come loose; do the 
same on the other end and remove the cover from 
the holder. 

Grasp the battery between the thumb and 
forefinger and lift out the battery. 



Replace 



1. Insert the new battery so the positive side of the 
battery is inserted into the positive-marked side of 
the holder (Figure 1, #5), the side away from the 
LED. 

CAUTION: Be sure the positive side of the battery is in the 
correct location (see Figure 1). An incorrectly placed 
battery can damage the logic board. 

2. Replace the holder cover. 

3. Replace the logic board . 

4. Set the clock using the Control Panel. 



Macintosh I lei 



Sep 89 



Additional Procedures / 5.5 



□ LOGIC BOARD RAM IDENTIFICATION AND UPGRADES 



I 



Introduction 



RAM for the Macintosh Ilci is provided in packages 
known as Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs). A 
SIMM is a circuit board 3.5-inches long and from 5/8- 
inch to 1-inch high, with two or eight (nine if parity 
chip is present) memory chips. The memory chips may 
be surface-mounted, or they may be mounted through 
the board. Each SIMM board has contacts on one edge 
that fit into sockets on the logic board. 



Identification 



The SIMMs are available with two sizes of RAM, 256K 
and 1 MB, and come in several configurations that can 
be used interchangeably. 

CAUTION: SIMMs are very susceptible to damage from 
ESP and skin acid. Handle only by the edges! 



Speed 



You must use 80 ns (or faster) SIMMs on the Macintosh 

Ilci. Slower SIMMs (e.g., 100 ns) will cause serious 
timing problems. The RAM speed is usually indicated 
by the -xx number after the manufacturer's part number. 
For example, -8 indicates 80 ns SIMMs and -12 
indicates 120 ns SIMMs. 



Note: When you are removing SIMMs from the logic 
board, use the SIMM removal tool. Instructions for 
using this tool are located in You Oughta Know. 



256K SIMMs 



The 256K SOJ (Single Out-line JLead) SIMMs 

(Figure 2) contain two surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has 

ten pins (or legs) on each of two sides. 



i 



o 



nnnnn nnnnn 



uuuuu uuuuu 



nnnnn nnnnn 



O 



UUUUU UUUUU 

nnnnnnnnnnnnnn n nnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 



FIGURE 2 



5.6 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh Ilci 



256K SIMMs are available in several speeds. However, 
only the 80ns SIMMs are suitable for the Macintosh 
Ilci. You can identify a 80ns SIMM by the number 8 
after the vendor's part number printed on the top of 
each chip. Only the 256K SIMMs that have two 1 MB 
chips (256K x 4 x 2) have been Apple qualified. 



1 MB SIMMs 



The 1 MB SIMMs come in two configurations: 



1 MB SOJ SIMM (Figure 3, #1) 
The 1 MB SOJ (Single Out-line JLead) SIMM 
contains eight surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has ten 
legs on each of two sides. 



1 MB x 9-bit SOJ SIMM (Figure 3, #2) 
The 1 MB SOJ (Single Out-line JLead) parity SIMM 
contains nine surface-mounted ICs. Each IC has ten 
legs on each of two sides. 



































c 
c 

or 

c 

1 § 




'! 


3 C 
3 C 

3 C 
3 C 




□ c 

3 C 
3 C 

a a 

3 C 




3 a 

1 C 
3 C 

3 a 
j a 




3 a 

3 C 
3 C 

3 a 
3 D 




3 C 

3 C 




3 C 

3 a 
5 c 

□ G 




! ° 

3 

B 




il 


3 C 

I E 

3 C 

a c 




□ C 

I E 

"J c 




3 c 

3 C 




3 C 




3 C 

3 C 




□ C 

3 C 

3 C 

□ C 




1 


DD 


DDDD 


DC 


:dd 


DC 


DDD 


DC 


una 


DC 


HDD 


DC 


DDD 


DC 


]DD 






o 



o 



DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDODDDDaDODDDDDD 




FIGURE 3 



Upgrades 



Various RAM upgrades are possible on the Macintosh 
Ilci, depending on the number and size of the SIMMs 
that you install on the logic board. 



For installation purposes, two banks of SIMM sockets 
are located on the logic board and are labeled Bank A 
(Figure 4, #1) and Bank B (Figure 4, #2). Each bank 
contains four slots, which are grouped into twos. All 
four slots within a bank must be filled with SIMMs of 
the same RAM size. 



Macintosh Ilci 



rev. Jan 90 



Additional Procedures / 5.7 



Each bank may contain either no RAM or four 256K, 
1 MB, 4 MB, or 16 MB SIMMs. (The 4 MB and 16 MB 
SIMMs can be used when available.) But at least one of 
the banks must have RAM in it. 






If you are using built-in video, you must have SIMMs in 
bank A because the built-in video uses bank A for video 
framing. If you are using a video card, then using bank 
A is optional. 

If the unit is a parity system, you can upgrade to more 
memory, but you must use the parity SIMMs (1 MB x 
9-bit SOJ SIMMs) to do so. If parity SIMMs are not 
used, the parity function will be disabled. 



o 1 1 n b b i=w 

- a rr V-T J ^ "" o n ° l 

□ O 



_o J [o 



r-1 pi 



£2 Do 



n *— * ,„ o 







c nracramri? 




FIGURE 4 



5.8 / Additional Procedures 



rev. Jan 90 



Macintosh llci 






The following chart summarizes the configurations that 
the Macintosh Ilci supports: 



RAM 

1 MB 



Bank A BankB 

Four 256K SIMMs Empty 

Empty* Four 256K SIMMs 



2 MB 



Four 256K SIMMs Four 256K SIMMs 



4 MB 



Four 1 MB SIMMs Empty 

Empty* Four 1 MB SIMMs 



5 MB 



Four 1 MB SIMMs Four 256K SIMMs 

Four 256K SIMMs Four 1 MB SIMMs 



8 MB 



Four 1 MB SIMMs Four 1 MB SIMMs 



4 MB 
Parity 


Four 1 MB 
parity SIMMs 




Empty 




Empty* 




Four 1 MB 
parity SIMMs 


8 MB 

Parity 


Four 1 MB 
parity SIMMs 




Four 1 MB 
parity SIMMs 


CAUTION: Other configurations, such as a single SIMM or 
a pair of different-size SIMMs, will not function correctly. 



DRAM is needed in bank A when built-in video is used. 



Macintosh Ilci 



Sep 89 



Additional Procedures / 5.9 



# Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh llci 

Illustrated Parts List 



□ CONTENTS 



IPL.3 Macintosh llci — System Exploded View 

(Figure 1) 
IPL.5 Macintosh llci — Logic Board (Figure 2) 
IPL.5 Macintosh llci — Logic Board with Parity 

(Figure 3) 
IPL.7 Macintosh llci — Cache Card (Figure 4) 



The figures and lists in this section include all piece 
parts that can be purchased separately from Apple for the 
Macintosh llci, along with their part numbers. These are 
the only parts available from Apple. Refer to your Apple 
Service Programs manual for prices. 



Macintosh llci rev. Apr 91 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.1 




FIGURE 1 



IPL2/ Illustrated Parts List 



rev. Mar 91 



Macintosh I lei 



□ MACINTOSH llci— SYSTEM EXPLODED VIEW (Figure 1) 

[Description 

Screw, M 3.5 x .6 x 8 (Top Cover, HDA Bracket to 

Bottom Case) 
Cable, Internal HDA Power 
Cable, Internal HDA 
Bracket, Power Supply Fan 
Power Supply Fan 

Screw, 6-32 x .250 (HDA to HDA Bracket) 
Power Supply with Fan 
On-Off Button 
Logic Board 
Logic Board, Parity 
Bottom Case 
Light Pipe, Power On 
Cable, Power AC (smoke) 
Rubber Feet 
Light Pipe, HDA 
Cable, HDA LED (amber) 
Screw, Socket, Phillips (1.4 MB Mechanism) 
Shield, Internal 1.4 MB Mechanism 
Reset/Interrupt Switch 

1.4 MB Mechanism, Apple FDHD/SuperDrive 
Cable, Internal 1.4 MB Mechanism 
Drive Carrier 
Speaker 

Speaker Bracket 
HDA, Internal 3.5 SCSI, 20 MB 
HDA, Internal 3.5 SCSI, 40 MB 
HDA, Internal 3.5 SCSI, 80 MB with A/UX, v.1.1 

(replaced by 661-0613) 
HDA, Internal 3.5 SCSI, 80 MB 
HDA, Internal 3.5 SCSI, 80 MB with A/UX, v.2.0 
Bracket, HDA, Mounting 
Top Cover 






item 


Part No. 


1 


416-1412 


2 


590-0512 


3 


590-0609 


4 


815-5071 


5 


982-0023 


6 


444-6104 


7 


661-0467 


8 


815-6033 


9 


661-0532 




661-0583 


10 


630-5662 


11 


815-6032 


12 


590-0380 


13 


865-0026 


14 


815-6036 


15 


590-0506 


16 


844-0018 


17 


805-0961 


18 


815-6034 


19 


661-0474 


20 


590-0607 


21 


815-6030 


22 


630-5503 


23 


815-6031 


24 


661-0373 




661-0464 




661-0561 




661-0600 




661-0613 


25 


805-5078 


26 


810-6028 



Macintosh llci rev. Apr 91 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.3 



U u 




& & gggg&j l 



\ 



FIGURE 2 



■ r-,p]¥3 p^i ,■■■■■ S9S| ^ „i i ii f--,-iMj 



I nil §g gg 

1 1 & °ea 



BBSS 42BQMMb ^^^^^B 



■ HP o 
o 

o 

o 




IPL.4 / Illustrated Parts List 



Sep 89 



Macintosh I lei 



□ MACINTOSH llci— LOGIC BOARD (Figure 2) 

Item Part No. Description 

661-0532 Logic Board 

1 742-0011 Lithium Battery 

2 520-0344 Battery Holder Cover 

3 661-0519 SIMM, 256K x 4, 80 ns 
661-0520 SIMM, 1 MB, 80 ns 



□ MACINTOSH llci— LOGIC BOARD WITH PARITY (Figure 3) 

Item Part No. Description 



661-0583 Logic Board, Parity 

1 742-0011 Lithium Battery 

2 520-0344 Battery Holder Cover 

3 661-0546 SIMM, 1 MB x 9, 80 ns, Parity 



Macintosh llci Sep 89 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.5 



o 



nnnnnn 



nnnnnn 



u u u u u u 



nnnnnn 



1IUUUUU 



%TTTT 



UTTD- 



CD 



# 



'iiiiiiii iiiiiiimin 



1 1 m m 1 1 n n m 1 1 1 ii i n ill 1 1 



k 



o 



FIGURE 4 



IPL.6 / Illustrated Parts List 



Apr 91 



Macintosh I lei 



□ MACINTOSH llci— CACHE CARD (Figure 4) 

Item Part No. Description 

- 661-1619 Macintosh llci Cache Card, Revised 



Note: The original Macintosh llci Cache card (661-1602) 
can cause frequent system crashes. This card has a "CF" 
serial number prefix, e.g., CFXXXXXXX. Return these 
cards to Apple. Additional information is available on 
AppleLink under the Apple Programs icon. 

The serial number on the revised Macintosh llci Cache 
card (66l-l6l9) begins with an "AF" prefix, e.g., 
AFXXXXXXX. This revised card should function 
properly; if it fails, return it to Apple through standard 
service channels. 



Macintosh llci Apr 91 Illustrated Parts List / IPL.7 






ft Apple Technical Procedures 



Macintosh Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Technical Procedures 



□ TABLE OF CONTENTS 




Section 1 - 1.2 


Introduction to MacTest MP 


MacTest MP 1.2 


Overview 


1.4 


Features 


1.7 


Starting MacTest MP 


1.7 


Materials Required 


1.7 


Test Setup 


1.8 


Operating MacTest MP 


1.8 


System Configuration Information 


1.9 


Macintosh Test Selections 


1.10 


Other Test Selections 


1.11 


Setting Looping Options 


1.12 


Setting Preferences 


1.13 


Using the Controls 


1.13 


As the Tests Are Running 


1.14 


MacTest MP Reference 


1.14 


Quick Reference 


1.15 


Menus and Keyboard Equivalents 


1.17 


System Software Compatibility 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Jan 91 



Contents / i 



©Apple Computer, Inc., 1990. No portion of this document may be reproduced in any form 

without the written permission of Apple Computer, Inc. 
FDHD, Apple Desktop Bus, SuperDrive, AppleColor, QuickDraw, and Finder are trademarks of 

Apple Computer, Inc. 
Macintosh, A/UX, AppleTalk, MultiFinder, Apple, and the Apple logo are registered trademarks 

of Apple Computer, Inc. 
UNIX® is a registered trademark of AT&T Information Systems. 
NuBus™ is a trademark of Texas Instruments. 
MS-DOS® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. 



ii / Contents Jan 91 Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



ft Apple Technical Procedures 

Macintosh Multiple-Product Diagnostics 

Section 1 - MacTest MP 



□ CONTENTS 








1.2 


Introduction to MacTest MP 




1.2 


Overview 




1.4 


Features 




1.7 


Starting MacTest MP 




1.7 


Materials Required 




1.7 


Test Setup 




1.8 


Operating MacTest MP 




1.8 


System Configuration Information 




1.9 


Macintosh Test Selections 




1.10 


Other Test Selections 




1.11 


Setting Looping Options 




1.12 


Setting Preferences 




1.13 


Using the Controls 




1.13 


As the Tests Are Running 




1.14 


MacTest MP Reference 




1.14 


Quick Reference 




1.15 


Menus and Keyboard Equivalents 




1.17 


System Software Compatibility 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics Jan 91 MacTest MP / 1 .1 



□ INTRODUCTION TO MACTEST MP 



I 



MacTest™ MP is a disk-based confidence program that 
you can use to isolate and identify faults in 
malfunctioning Macintosh Ilfx, Macintosh Ilsi, and 
Macintosh LC computers. After completing any needed 
repairs, you can use the program to verify proper 
system operation. 

In addition, MacTest MP can be used with any 
Macintosh II family computer to test various Apple 
peripherals and monitors (see below). 

MacTest MP tests the following modules and 
peripherals: 

• Logic board (Macintosh nfx, nsi, and LC only) 

• Internal and external floppy disk drives 

• Apple monitors (adjustment test patterns) 

• Apple video cards 

MacTest MP does not test hard disk drives. To test a 
hard disk drive, use the Macintosh Hard Disk Test disk. 
Procedures for using Macintosh Hard Disk Test can be 
found in Section 3, Diagnostics, in SCSI Hard Disk 
Drives Technical Procedures. 

IMPORTANT: If your customer's Macintosh Ilfx or 
Macintosh Ilsi is configured with a Macintosh Display 
Card 8*24GC, you must remove any 8*24GC INITs from 
the system folder before running MacTest MP. Failure to 
remove 8*24GC INITs from the system folder will cause 
MacTest MP to hang. 



Overview 



The MacTest MP main window shown in Figure 3-1 
includes the following functions: 

• Iconic program controls 

• System configuration 

• Logic board test selections 

• Other test selections (floppy drive, ADB 
communications, Apple expansion and video cards, 
and Apple monitor tests) 

• Testing status indicator 

• Test log indicator 



1.2 /MacTest MP 



Jan 91 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Note: The arrangement of items within the main 
window will vary depending on the size of the monitor 
and the system to which the monitor is connected. 



Modest™ MP 1.1 



Is*** 



nn 

ULi 



loi 




300001 



System vers: 6.0.6 
AppleTalk vers : Not Opened 
QuickDraw yws: 2.2 
ROM vers: 67c.26f4 



System type: Macintosh LC 
Parity : Not Available 

CPU /FPU type: 68020 
Video RAM size 256 KB 



ROM size: 512KB 

RAM size: 2MB 

Pover-on hours: 44 
Production Date : 9/26/90 



I — Logic Board — 

□ Component teats 
13 RAM teat 



□ Serial loopback 

□ Video RAM teat 



Select Macintosh Tests 

I — Floppy Drives 

□ Right/Internal 

□ Urf*/ Extern*! 



,— ADB Port 

□ Mouse 



Slot 1 : 



Select Otter Tests 

BIY: 



|0] Monitor connected to built-in 
Yideo 



Status : Press "Start" to begin your Session. 



Test Log: 



Figure 3-1 Main Window for 12-Inch Monitor with Macintosh LC 

Each time a test sequence runs, the results are 
temporarily stored in a test log. By selecting 
(highlighting) the Log icon you can display a window 
containing the contents of the current test log. The test 
log shown in this window can be saved, printed, and 
customized to include the name and address of the 
customer and the service center (see Setting 
Preferences under "Operating MacTest MP"). Saved 
test logs can also be opened, added to (if the system 
configuration and tests selected are the same), and 
printed. 

Note: If you are unable to print an open Test Log, save 
the Test Log, reboot MacTest MP, and try printing the 
log again. 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Jan 91 



MacTest MP/ 1.3 



Features 



Figure 3-2. MacTest MP has the following features: 



Easy-to-use program controls. This bar of icons 
along the top of the main window controls the 
operation of the diagnostic program (Start, Stop, and 
Pause), and includes these additional features: 

- A log icon, which when selected (highlighted) 
displays a log of the test being run or just 
completed. Test logs can be printed, saved, and 
customized with service center and customer data. 

- A looping icon, which when selected 
(highlighted) repeats the selected tests to find 
problems that occur intermittently or over time. 

- A question-mark icon, which provides assistance 
for some types of test failures. The question- 
mark icon is grayed except when additional 
service information is available. 




System vers: 6.0.5 
Apple Talk vers: 54 
QuickDraw vers: 2.2 
ROM vers: 67c.11f2 



System type: 
Parity: 

CPU/FPU type: 
Video RAM Size: 



Macintosh llfx 
Not Available 
68030 / 68882 
Not Available 



ROM size: 512KB 

RAM size: 8 MB 

Pover-on hours: 477 

Production Date: 9/21/91 



Select Macintosh Tests 



I — Logic Board — 

□ Component tests 

^ RAM test 

□ Serial loop back 



I — Floppy Drives 

□ Right/Internal 

□ Left/External 



r— ADB Port 

□ Mouse 



Select Other Tests 

Slot 1 : C^J-^o) Macintosh II High Resolution Yideo 
Card 

SI ot 2 : C^^~~R! Macl n * os n ' ' T vo " Pa 9 e M noc h r ° mc 
"*' Yideo Card 

Slot 3: 



Slot 4: 



Slot 5: r;::^| EtherNetcard 



Slot 6: 



Status: Press "Start" to begin your Session. 



Test Log: 



Figure 3-2 Main Window for 13-Inch Monitor with Macintosh llfx 



1.4 /MacTest MP 



Jan 91 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



System configuration information — including system 
software, AppleTalk, QuickDraw, and ROM versions; 
system and processor types; amount of system RAM 
and ROM; parity checking; amount of video RAM; the 
date when the system was produced; and the number 
of hours the system has been powered-on. 

Selectable logic board tests for components, system 
RAM, serial loopback circuitry, and video RAM. The 
logic board component tests test the circuits and 
components listed below. 

Components common to all three computers : 

- ROM (read-only memory) 

- SCC (serial communications controller) 

- SWIM disk drive controller 

- VIA (versatile interface adaptor) 

- SCSI registers 

- RTC (real time clock) (not tested on the 
Macintosh Ilsi) 

Macintosh Hfx components : 

- FPU (floating-point unit) 

- ASC (Apple sound chip) 

- FMC (fast memory controller) 

- OSS (operating system support) 

Macintosh Ilsi components : 

- RBV (RAM-based video) 

Macintosh LC components : 

- BIV (built-in video) 

- CLUT (color look-up table) 

Selectable tests of the internal and external floppy 
drives (external on the Macintosh Ilex, Ilci, and Ilsi 
only) and system-to-mouse Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) 
communications. 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics rev. Apr 91 MacTest MP / 1 .5 



• Tests for Apple video cards installed in the NuBus 
slots. MacTest MP tests these Apple video cards: 

IMPORTANT: In order for MacTest MP to test the 
Macintosh II Portrait Video Card, a monitor must be 
attached to the installed card. For the monitor test 
patterns to function, you must upgrade the Macintosh 
Portrait Video Card by using a Video Card Expansion Kit 
(8 RAM chips). 

- Macintosh II Monochrome Video Card 

- Macintosh II Video Card 

- Macintosh II High-Resolution Display Video Card 

- Macintosh II Extended High-Resolution Display 
Video Card 

- Macintosh II Two-Page Monochrome Video Card 

- Macintosh II Portrait Video Card 

- Macintosh Display Card 4*8 

- Macintosh Display Card 8*24 

- Macintosh Display Card 8»24GC (Be sure to 
remove any 8 # 24GC INITs from the System 
Folder before testing this card.) 

• Tests for other Apple cards: 

- Macintosh Ilci Cache Card Revised 

- Apple He Card 

• Test patterns for adjusting Macintosh monitors 
(available by selecting the monitor icon and clicking 
Start). Test patterns are available for adjusting the 
following Apple Macintosh monitors: 

- Apple High-Resolution Monochrome Monitor 

- AppleCoIor™ High-Resolution RGB Monitor 

- Apple Macintosh Portrait Display 

- Apple Two-Page Monochrome Monitor 

- Macintosh 12-Inch Monochrome Display 

- Macintosh 12-Inch RGB Display 



1 .6 / MacTest MP rev. Apr 91 Multiple-Product Diagnostics 






□ STARTING MACTEST MP 



This section provides step-by-step procedures for 
setting up MacTest MP. 



Materials Required 



Macintosh Ilfx, Macintosh Ilsi, or Macintosh LC 

Macintosh monitor and video cable 

ADB keyboard and mouse 

MacTest MP diagnostic disk (backup copy) 

Peripheral-8 serial interface cable (required only for 

serial loopback test) 
Blank 800K or 1.4 MB floppy disk (required only for 

floppy drive test) 

Note: Make a backup copy of the MacTest MP diagnostic 
disk before you begin. When testing a defective system, 
it is possible to damage or erase the disk. 

Note: If you plan to test system RAM or loop on tests 
including the RAM test, you should make MacTest MP 
the boot disk and application. To do this, select the 
MacTest MP application icon, select Set Startup from the 
Special menu, and click OK. 



Test 
Setup 



Perform steps 1 and 2 only if the computer is not set 
up. If you need more information, refer to the 
appropriate Macintosh Owner's Guide. 

1. Connect AC power cords from an AC outlet to the 
computer and to the monitor. Also connect the 
keyboard and mouse to the computer. 

2. Connect the video cable to the monitor. Connect the 
other end of the video cable to the external video 
port or the connector on the Macintosh video card. 

3. If you will be running the serial loopback test, 
connect the serial cable between the printer port 
and the modem port. 

4. Insert a copy of the MacTest MP program disk into 
the right internal drive and switch on system power. 

5. Open the MacTest MP disk icon and launch the 
MacTest MP application. (This step is unnecessary 
if you have "Set Startup" as indicated above. 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Jan 91 



MacTest MP/ 1.7 



□ OPERATING MACTEST MP 



System Configuration 
Information 



Figure 3-3. The main window area displays a variety of 
useful information concerning the hardware and 
software configuration of the system under test. Before 
running the tests, verify that the information displayed 
matches what is in the system. 

System vers: The version of the System software 
located in the System Folder on the startup disk. 

AppleTalk vers: The version of AppleTalk, if the 
computer is connected to an AppleTalk network. 

QuickDraw vers: The version of QuickDraw located in 
the System Folder on the startup drive or in ROM. 

ROM vers: The version of firmware in the system ROMs. 

System type: The type of Macintosh computer that is 
running MacTest MP. 

Parity: Indicates if the parity option is installed on the 
Macintosh Ilfx. 

CPU/FPU type: The type (68000, 68020, or 68030) of 
central processing unit (CPU) installed in the computer, 
and the type of floating-point math coprocessor (FPU) if 
one is installed in the computer. 

Video RAM size: The amount of video RAM installed on 
the video RAM SIMM. 

ROM size: The amount of ROM installed in the computer. 

RAM size: The amount of physical random-access 
memory in the computer. The amount includes built-in 
RAM and RAM SIMMs. 

Power-on hours: The number of hours that the 
computer has been in use since the production date. 

Note: If parameter RAM has been cleared, the 
power-on hours revert to zero and the production 
date is cleared. 

Production Date: The computer's date of manufacture. 



1.8 /MacTest MP 



Jan 91 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Macintosh Test 
Selections 



Figure 3-3. The Select Macintosh Tests area allows you 
to select the tests you want to run. To select a test, 
click the box next to the name of the test. An X 
appears in the box. To deselect the test, click the box 
again and the X disappears. If a selection is dimmed, 
the test is not available. The following section 
explains each test and describes any special 
requirements to run the test. 




Sy stem vers : 6 .0 .5 
AppleTalk -vers: 54 
QuickDraw vers: 2.2 
ROM vers: 67c.11f2 



System type: Macintosh llfx 
Parity : Not Available 

CPU /FPU type: 68030/ 
Video RAM size:Not Available 



ROM size: 512KB 

RAM size: 8MB 

Pover-on hours : 212 
Production Date : 3/21/91 



Select Macintosh Tests 



I — Logic Board — 

□ Component tests 

[3 RAM teat 

□ Serial loopbeck 



I — Floppy Drives 

□ Right/Internal 

□ Left/External 



^ADB Port 

□ Mouse 



Slot 1: 
Slot 2: 
Slot 3: 
Slot 4: 
Slot 5: 
Slot 6: 



Select Other Tests 

C^(|L^<5) Macintosh 
Two-Page 



(— T DMg) Macintosh [4/8 - 

8/24] Display Video 



Status: Press "Start" to begin your Session. 



Test Log: 



Figure 3-3 Main Window for 12-Inch Monitor with Macintosh llfx 



Logic Board 



The logic board tests are divided into four selections: 

Component tests - Tests all logic board circuitry and 
most components. Refer to Features under "Introduction 
to MacTest MP for a complete list of logic board 
components and circuits tested by MacTest MP. 

Data transfer tests for the serial interfaces are 
selectable separately. 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Jan 91 



MacTest MP/ 1.9 



RAM test - Performs a test of system memory as 
indicated by RAM size. The test takes approximately 
one minute per 2 megabytes of RAM to run, and reboots 
the system when done. 

Video RAM test - Tests the VRAM (video RAM) chips 
installed on the 68-pin VRAM SIMM (Macintosh LC 
only) or on the video card. The amount of VRAM 
memory tested is indicated by Video RAM size. 

Serial loopback - Tests the two serial interfaces by 
performing a series of bidirectional data transfers 
between the modem and printer serial ports. A 
peripheral-8 serial cable installed between the modem 
and printer ports is required for this test. 



i 



Floppy Drives 



Right/Internal and Left/External - Performs a 
write/read/verify test of the right and left (optional) 
internal 1.4 MB FDHD SuperDrive disk drives. Also 
tests external floppy drives connected to the external 
disk drive port on the Macintosh Ilsi. This test 
requires a blank 1.4 MB floppy disk. 



ADB Port 



Mouse - Tests the Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) circuitry 
by establishing communication with a known-good ADB 
keyboard and mouse. Note that this is not a test of the 
mouse itself. This test checks only for communication 
between the mouse and computer. 



Other Test 
Selections 



The Select Other Tests area (see Figure 3-3) of the 

main window identifies and tests Apple video cards. If 
a card is installed in an expansion slot and MacTest MP 
recognizes the card, a card icon and the card name are 
displayed next to the slot number. The message 
Unfamiliar Card appears next to the card icon if 
MacTest MP does not recognize the card. If a test is 
not available for the card, the card icon will be grayed. 
No icon or card name appears next to an empty slot. 

For additional information about a card, double-click on 
the slot number, card icon, or card name. 



1.10 /MacTest MP 



rev. Apr 91 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Monitor Test Patterns 



The Select Other Tests area of the main window also 
enables you to adjust monitors connected to the 
system's built-in video port (BIV) or a video card. To 
display the test patterns, select the appropriate monitor 
icon and click Start. You can access additional 
information about the selected monitor or about using 
the test patterns by double-clicking on BIV or on the 
monitor icon. 






To display the monitor test patterns : 

- Select the monitor icon and click Start 

To move forward through the test patterns : 

- Press the Space bar 

- Type <Shift> <+> 

- Click the mouse 

To return to a previous test pattern : 

- Type <Option> and click the mouse 

- Type <-> 

Note: In the backward direction (<->) you may loop 
through the six test patterns as many times as you wish. 
However, in the forward direction (<Shift> <+>) the 
main window appears after the sixth test pattern. 



Setting Looping 
Options 



The looping options in MacTest MP allow modules to 
be tested repeatedly. Looping can be useful for 
isolating intermittent or non immediate failures. Two 
choices of looping are available — setting a specific 
number of times to repeat the selected tests, or looping 
until stopped by the user. Setup Looping is found 
under the Options menu. 

If you are looping on the RAM test, MacTest MP 
automatically reboots the computer at the end of each 
pass. The MacTest MP program also automatically 
reboots if MacTest MP has been made the startup disk 
and startup application (see the note under "Starting 
MacTest MP"). For several seconds, MacTest MP then 
displays the results of the test. During this time you 
may stop the looping. If you do not stop the looping, 
MacTest MP automatically runs another RAM test. 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



rev. Apr 91 



MacTest MP/ 1.11 



Setting Preferences 



MacTest MP test logs can be customized to include 
service center and customer information, system 
configuration, and a time/date stamp. You may 
customize test logs selecting Preferences from the Log 
menu. The Log menu is deactivated (grayed), however, 
unless a test log is open and selected (is the front 
window). 



To select a test log, click the log icon to open a new 
test log; open a saved test log from the File menu; or 
select an open log from the Windows menu. With the 
desired test log open on your screen, select 
Preferences from the Log menu. You may now enter 
the service center and customer information and set test 
log options. The Test Log Preferences dialog box is 
shown in Figure 3-4. 





Show in Test Log: Test Log- 

13 Dealer Information 
13 Customer Information 
£3 System Configuration 
[3 Time/Date 

Dealer Information: 


2 
Customer Information: 






Sam & Dane's Mac 

Shop 

1500 Studio Plaza 

Land Lakes, UJI 

53121 


<> 




Doug Jones 

1 1 Riuerfront Driue 

Land '0 Lakes, UJI 

53121 


















Cancel |[ k 0K 


j 












Vin \ 





Figure 3-4 Test Log Preferences Dialog Box 



1.12 /MacTest MP 



Jan 91 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 






Using the Controls 



After selecting tests and setting preferences and 
looping options, testing can begin. The following 
controls are available by clicking: 

• Start - Begins running the selected tests. 

• Stop - Terminates the test(s) in process. 

• Pause - Temporarily suspends the tests. Click 
Pause again to resume testing. 

• Log - Turns the display of the test log window on 
or off. If no open log exists, a new log is created 
and displayed. 

• ? icon - Contains additional information about the 
test failure. The icon is grayed when no additional 
information is available. 

• Loop - Indicates whether looping is ON (the 
circular, looping-arrow icon is highlighted) or OFF 
(the circular arrow is white/clear). A loop counter 
is beneath the icon. 



As the Tests 
Are Running 



The Status line at the lower-left corner of the main 
window indicates the progress of MacTest MP as tests 
run. You can temporarily suspend tests by clicking 
Pause, and you can end tests by clicking Stop or typing 
36 - <period>. 

Note: During the RAM test and video card tests the 
mouse and keyboard do not operate. The RAM and 
video card tests must run to completion. 

If no problems are found, MacTest MP displays the 
message All Tests Passed. 

If MacTest MP encounters a problem, the test stops and 
displays an error message on the Status line and in the 
test log. If assistance is available, the question-mark 
icon is highlighted. Click the question mark for 
assistance. If information supplied by MacTest MP 
doesn't correct the problem, refer to Section 4, 
Troubleshooting. 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Jan 91 



MacTest MP/ 1.13 



□ MACTEST MP REFERENCE 



Quick Reference 



The following procedure summarizes the steps to set up 
and run MacTest MP. Detailed procedures are included 
under the heading "Running MacTest MP." Remember to 
use a copy of MacTest MP and to set startup to 
automatically open the MacTest MP application. 

1. Set up the Macintosh Ilfx, Macintosh Ilsi, or 
Macintosh LC to be tested. A video monitor and 
cable, keyboard, and mouse are required. 



2. Connect the serial loopback cable if necessary. 

3. Insert the MacTest MP diagnostic disk in the right 
internal disk drive and switch on the computer. 

4. If the desktop appears, open the MacTest MP disk 
icon. 

5. Launch the MacTest MP application. 

6. Verify that the system configuration information is 
correct. 

7. Select the tests you wish to run. 

8. Use Setup Looping under the Options menu to select 
looping options, and select the looping icon if 
desired. 

9. Click Start to begin testing. 

10. Print and save the test log if desired, and use 
Preferences under the Log menu to enter service 
center and customer information 



1.14 /MacTest MP 



Jan 91 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 






Menus and 
Keyboard Equivalents 



The MacTest MP menus and menu selections are 
listed below. Keyboard equivalents are indicated. 



Apple Menu 



The Apple (jfr) menu contains the following selection: 

About MacTest MP - Displays a dialog box containing 
the diagnostic name and version number. 



File Menu 



The File menu contains the following selections: 

New (36 - N ) - Creates a new test log. This new test 
log will be the current log until it is closed, a new log 
is created, or another log is opened. 

Open (36 - £)) - Opens a saved test log. A saved test 
log can be opened for display, printing, or appending. 

Close (36 - W) - Closes the current test log. If the 
contents have not been saved, a dialog box will ask 
whether you wish to save the current test log. 

Save (36 - £) - Displays a dialog box that asks you for a 
file name to save the test log contents. 

Save As - Displays a dialog box that asks you for a file 
name. MacTest MP saves the test log contents under 
the new name. 

Revert to Saved - Opens the previously saved test log. 

Save Selections - Saves the current test and looping 
selections. 

Page Setup - Displays the standard printer page setup 
dialog box. Refer to the Macintosh System Software 
User's Guide for information. 

Print (36 - P) - Prints the contents of the active test 
log to the printer selected in the Chooser. 

Quit (36 - Q) - Terminates the program and returns to 
the Finder™ (desktop). 

Eject (36 - E) - Ejects the floppy disks in all internal 
and external floppy disk drives. 






Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Jan 91 



MacTest MP/ 1.15 



Controls Menu 



The Controls menu contains the following selections: 



Start (36 - £.) - Begins running the selected logic board 
and peripheral tests. 

Stop (36 -<period>) - Ends running the test(s) in 
process. 

Pause (36 - <apostrophe>) - Temporarily suspends 
(dark/highlighted button) the test in process. Click 
Pause again to resume testing (light button). 

Log (36 - L) - Displays (dark/highlighted button) or 
hides (light button) the contents of the current test log. 

Loop (36-1) - Turns looping on (dark/highlighted 
button) or off (light button). 

? icon (36 - Y) - When highlighted, displays a possible 
action to take as the result of a test failure. 



Options Menu 



The Options menu contains the following selections: 

Setup Looping - Displays the looping options dialog 
box shown in Figure 3-5. You can set the number of 
loops, or you can loop on the selected tests until you 
enter the stop command. 

Shut Down - Quits MacTest MP and runs the safe 
shutdown sequence as if you had selected Shut Down 
from the Finder. 



(§) Loop J 5|time(s). 

O Loop until stopped. 



Cancel 



GD 



Figure 3-5 Looping Options Dialog Box 



1.16/ MacTest MP 



Jan 91 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Window Menu 



The Windows menu contains the following selections: 

Main Window (S§ - M) - Brings the MacTest MP main 
window to the front and makes it the active window. 

Test Log 1-x - If test logs are open, their names are 
added to the Windows menu. To bring a test log to the 
front (active window), select that test log entry from 
the menu. 



Log Menu 



The Log menu contains the following selection: 

Preferences - Contains selections for including the 
service center and customer information, system 
configuration, and time and date in the test log. 



Illustrations Menu 



The Illustrations menu allows you to display drawings 
of Macintosh modules and video cards. 



System Software 
Compatibility 



To run MacTest MP, you must use system software 
version 6.0.7 or later. Also, the system folder located 
on the MacTest MP disk should not contain any non- 
Apple supplied startup or control panel documents, desk 
accessories, device drivers, or other system software 
modifications. Apple cannot guarantee the accuracy of 
test results with third-party operating system 
modifications. 



MultiFinder Compatibility 



MacTest MP is MultiFinder® compatible. However, 
Apple recommends that MultiFinder not be active when 
you run MacTest MP. Running MacTest MP under 
MultiFinder may produce erroneous test results because 
of incompatibility with other software. 



Multiple-Product Diagnostics 



Jan 91 



MacTest MP/ 1.17